OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 24, 2014, 01:23:21 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: I maybe taking a friend to church this weekend-please advise  (Read 1173 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« on: May 22, 2013, 10:51:03 PM »

She wants to go to church with me to spend time with me and attend church somewhere on Sunday while her parents are out of town and she will not be able to drive herself. I may be able to carpool to my church, but I am not sure, so I may be driving her and I to church.

The nearest Oriental churches are Coptic and Syriac. There is a Syriac a little farther from me that I have been to before and it appears there is a Syriac church closer to me that I just discovered (not sure if they will use any English in the sermon and I am not sure if the previous distinction is relevant info for those of you know who that I have had trouble attending my church with the accident and internship and still a little with the accident).

My friend is a Korean American in a contemporary style Presbyterian church and has never set foot in an Orthodox church before.  I don't want to completely freak her out. She has seen a Messianic festival with me, thinks that Catholics are like regular Christians with a little more emphasis on Mary.

I would be most comfortable with introducing her to the Armenian church, and that may be possible if I take painkiller. (I am starting to go half of the way through the day without meds before I feel anything.)

Please offer any advice on where we should go and how much I should explain to her.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 11:07:23 PM by Anastasia1 » Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
LizaSymonenko
Слава Ісусу Христу!!! Glory to Jesus Christ!!!
Global Moderator
Toumarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: God's Holy Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A.
Posts: 13,455



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2013, 03:01:00 AM »


I'm sorry to hear you are still in pain.

I would take somewhere you are familiar with.

Don't take her to a church that is also new to you.

One of you ought to be at ease and comfortable.
Logged

Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria
dzheremi
No longer posting here.
Warned
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 4,383


« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2013, 03:45:11 AM »

I would second Liza's advice to take her to the church you are most familiar and comfortable with yourself, not to a new one. I would also add that it is a good idea not to overwhelm her. Let her ask her own questions. Shortly after I began to attend the Coptic church that is in Albuquerque, we had a Lutheran family visit. They had never been to an Orthodox Church before, either. They seemed very nice to me, and a bit more evangelical than traditional Anglo-Catholic. Since the wife of the family had told people that she was ex-Roman Catholic like me, I was eager to talk to her. Unfortunately, I never got the chance to do so, because immediately after the liturgy they were swamped by loud, even more eager parishioners who asked them what could be taken to be very pointed or uncomfortable questions about what they thought of the liturgy, what they think of Orthodox theology vs. Lutheran (as if they should know the difference after one liturgy!), etc. And when they asked questions, many people were rude in the zealousness of their responses. Immediately after they left (never to return), a few people even said things about how ridiculous some of their questions were, since they assumed we were just funny Roman Catholics. Well, we didn't do much to show them what we were about, so I can't blame them for that impression, or for never coming back.

Please, please don't do that. I still remember how overwhelmed I felt after my first Coptic Orthodox liturgy, and I had prepared for it (mentally) for about two years by that point! I can't imagine that Korean Presbyterians have any more in common with Armenian, Syriac, or Coptic Orthodox people and their cultures than I did or do...so I would approach things in a very relaxed way with her, and at her direction.
Logged

Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,943



« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2013, 03:27:46 PM »

Why did you became Armenian if there are other OO churches more near to you?
Logged

WPM
Revolutionary Writer
Moderated
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,621



« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2013, 04:49:08 PM »

Well, that means driving to the location and walking in and seating arrangements.
Logged
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 04:57:17 PM »

Why did you became Armenian if there are other OO churches more near to you?
The only one I knew of was Coptic, and one of the happiest times of my life was when I had an Armenian political advocacy internship, I thought it would be cool to meet more Armenians who go to church, and I am part Armenian (which also helped because I was nervous to tell my family from whom I kept the depth of my non-Protestant inclinations from since my youth and whom I still live with), and by the time the other church closed and I really needed to either commit to becoming Orthodox and getting into a church or find some other church to go to, I had an Armenian co-worker to whom I would occasionally ask questions about the church. The Syriac that is in the middle was tempting, and the priest is half Armenian and his wife reminds me of my old Messianic rabbi's wife, but  the priest who chrismated me is a good priest and I thought stability would be important in my first year as an Orthodox Christian-though occasionally this has not worked out quite as well as I had hoped.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 05:00:57 PM by Anastasia1 » Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 05:02:13 PM »

Well, that means driving to the location and walking in and seating arrangements.
It also means explaining closed communion to her, and telling her ahead of time that the service is going to have a lot of liturgy that she is not used to and that is where we have worship songs, not the worship songs she is used to.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2013, 02:05:09 PM »


I'm sorry to hear you are still in pain.

I would take somewhere you are familiar with.

Don't take her to a church that is also new to you.

One of you ought to be at ease and comfortable.

And probably one where I know she will understand the sermon.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,644


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2013, 02:18:44 PM »

so did u decide yet?
i would go to which ever one has more love shown to visitors.
it was love that kept me coming back to the orthodox church, once i had visited out of curiosity.
 Smiley
Logged
Jovan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Great Britain and Scandinavia
Posts: 515



« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2013, 02:29:56 PM »

Lord have mercy upon my dear sisters in faith, grant peace and joy upon their hearts in every decision.

I would suggest, as others have mentioned, that you don´t take her to a church that you are unfamiliar with . A personal advice, if one from a sinner helps sister, from when I invited a friend to my baptism and a vesper service. I think that personal contact with either the priest or the church members are very helpful. I can only reflect without being 100% certain. But when I got baptized and burst out into crying, and the priest hugged me for many seconds. My friend stood speechless, wondering probably why a man with long vestments hugged me, and he had never seen my cry Tongue He saw some kind of love, joy and peace that couldn´t be explained on his terms. The same when we attended on a vesper service togheter, which he never had attended before. When he saw me crossing myself, staying for 1 hour and really enjoying the service. Some things probably came to mind for him. But in a church where you never have attended before,you first need to "break the ice" with people before your friend can see the true meaning of the faith in the orthodox church.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2013, 02:31:44 PM by Jovan » Logged

“Belatedly I loved thee, O Beauty so ancient and so new, belatedly I loved thee. For see, thou wast within and I was without, and I sought thee out there."
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2013, 04:41:41 PM »

I just went to a bbq at the Syriac church, make a couple new friends and signed up for the youth group, but the priest does not always speak English there in the sermon. The Armenian one is my usual parish which I have not been to since March 29, I know a few people there, and know that there will be an English sermon, also, getting there should not be a problem as long as I take an Aleve and don't change the radio station a lot (arm angle thing).

The friend that I am taking tomorrow would need me to give her a ride any time that she came, so don't expect her to convert any time soon. I invited another friend who is interested in Middle Eastern culture to the bbq, and she wants to come to different activities and get to know the people there as she is able.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2013, 04:54:20 PM by Anastasia1 » Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Jovan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Great Britain and Scandinavia
Posts: 515



« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2013, 05:18:49 PM »

Sorry sister if I gave you the impression that you are gonna convert her, forgive me please if I wronged you.

My message was that both you and the friend, may God bless you both richly, may take time to find comfort if you attend a new church. I just talk out of my own experience so please forgive me if its a bit unclear. But when I doubted in one of my visit with a friend, he directly noticed it. May God forgive me if my slothful and doubtful spirit held my close friend away from ever coming to church again.
Logged

“Belatedly I loved thee, O Beauty so ancient and so new, belatedly I loved thee. For see, thou wast within and I was without, and I sought thee out there."
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2013, 05:34:09 PM »

Sorry sister if I gave you the impression that you are gonna convert her, forgive me please if I wronged you.

My message was that both you and the friend, may God bless you both richly, may take time to find comfort if you attend a new church. I just talk out of my own experience so please forgive me if its a bit unclear. But when I doubted in one of my visit with a friend, he directly noticed it. May God forgive me if my slothful and doubtful spirit held my close friend away from ever coming to church again.
Oh no! No worries! It's just that my friend didn't ask because she wanted to go to an Orthodox church but because she needed a ride to get to any church this weekend and wanted to spend time with me. I want to give her a good impression of Orthodoxy.  It would be awesome if she started reading up on it and taking a more Orthodox view on things. Everyone should convert to Orthodoxy if they can.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Jovan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Great Britain and Scandinavia
Posts: 515



« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2013, 06:19:16 PM »

Sorry sister if I gave you the impression that you are gonna convert her, forgive me please if I wronged you.

My message was that both you and the friend, may God bless you both richly, may take time to find comfort if you attend a new church. I just talk out of my own experience so please forgive me if its a bit unclear. But when I doubted in one of my visit with a friend, he directly noticed it. May God forgive me if my slothful and doubtful spirit held my close friend away from ever coming to church again.
Oh no! No worries! It's just that my friend didn't ask because she wanted to go to an Orthodox church but because she needed a ride to get to any church this weekend and wanted to spend time with me. I want to give her a good impression of Orthodoxy.  It would be awesome if she started reading up on it and taking a more Orthodox view on things. Everyone should convert to Orthodoxy if they can.

I pray that God will work through your humble name Anastasia to draw your friend to closer love and devotion for God. Your love and care for her won´t be without answers. Really admire your approach, I should learn from you when I meet friends :')
Logged

“Belatedly I loved thee, O Beauty so ancient and so new, belatedly I loved thee. For see, thou wast within and I was without, and I sought thee out there."
Salpy
Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Armenian Church
Posts: 12,823


Pray for the Christians of Iraq and Syria.


« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2013, 02:30:58 AM »

So what happened?  Were you able to make it to church today with your friend? 
Logged

Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2013, 07:55:35 PM »

So what happened?  Were you able to make it to church today with your friend? 
I made it. We got there 10 minutes late (missed the exit and had to turn around). I got help finding the place in the liturgy book so she could read what was going on. The service was longer than she expected (I forgot to tell her how long it was), and she didn't say the liturgy but read along with most of it. I did not get into the communion part because she can't have wine for a medical reason, the sermon was good, and I think she enjoyed eating lunch afterwards-which was neat because I've done the same at her church where we ate Korean food. I think she had a pleasant time, apart from not feeling 100% herself.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Salpy
Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Armenian Church
Posts: 12,823


Pray for the Christians of Iraq and Syria.


« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2013, 08:09:39 PM »

I'm glad it turned out well.   Smiley
Logged

WPM
Revolutionary Writer
Moderated
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,621



« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2013, 10:02:51 PM »

I've taken my mom and grandma to an Orthodox service  Smiley Their opinion that its not much different and liturgically the same.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2013, 10:04:53 PM by WPM » Logged
mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,644


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2013, 05:02:52 AM »

that's good, i hope they will remember what they have seen and think about it and know God more.

anastasia, which church did you go to in the end?
Logged
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2013, 04:21:08 PM »

Mabsoota, the Armenian one.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,644


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2013, 04:26:13 PM »

aah, armenian food. yum.
 Grin
don't tell the egyptians, but people in western asia make the best stuffed vine leaves and aubergines.
(egyptians still make the best falafel!)
Logged
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2013, 04:31:47 PM »

aah, armenian food. yum.
 Grin
don't tell the egyptians, but people in western asia make the best stuffed vine leaves and aubergines.
(egyptians still make the best falafel!)
I make the best falafel (but the place I got my mix from is closed now).

A Coptic festival I went to once had dolmata better than any dolma I ever ate
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Online Online

Posts: 18,316


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2013, 06:12:36 PM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   
Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
LBK
No Reporting Allowed
Moderated
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,441


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2013, 02:48:14 AM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   

Can't you make it yourself? Is there no equivalent of a baba or yiayia you know who does?
Logged
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,943



« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2013, 10:01:12 AM »

I've taken my mom and grandma to an Orthodox service  Smiley Their opinion that its not much different and liturgically the same.

WR or ER?
Logged

Aram
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Armenian Church
Posts: 256


« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2013, 10:49:22 AM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   

Can't you make it yourself? Is there no equivalent of a baba or yiayia you know who does?
It's not that easy to make. Honestly, I don't know anyone who makes it at home with any regularity. Usually you depend on a local middle eastern or Armenian store that has it, or hope that your church women's guild makes it for sale.

This is what we're talking about:

Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Online Online

Posts: 18,316


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2013, 01:08:12 PM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   

Can't you make it yourself? Is there no equivalent of a baba or yiayia you know who does?
It's not that easy to make. Honestly, I don't know anyone who makes it at home with any regularity. Usually you depend on a local middle eastern or Armenian store that has it, or hope that your church women's guild makes it for sale.

This is what we're talking about:



Oh, it's like food porn...and on a Wednesday too!  You shouldn't have posted that!

LBK, I'm an amateur in the kitchen.  Expert dish-washer/cleaner, expert eater, but not so much a cook. 
Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,644


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2013, 02:35:44 PM »

ok, i have to ask..
it looks like a piece of bread scattered with either multicoloured sugar crystals or a strange mix of spices.
although the colour mix resembles something not very delicious  Wink

so please let us know what it is; you can leave the answer till tomorrow if you like!
 Smiley
Logged
sheenj
OC.net guru
*******
Online Online

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Indian/Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Posts: 1,402


St. Gregorios of Parumala, pray for us...


« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2013, 02:38:53 PM »

Looks like Armenian Pizza to me.
Logged
Salpy
Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Armenian Church
Posts: 12,823


Pray for the Christians of Iraq and Syria.


« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2013, 04:06:45 PM »

Yeah, it's often called Armenian Pizza.   Smiley


mabsoota,

լահմաջուն is lahmajoon.  It comes from the Arabic words for meat and dough, so it is probably not originally Armenian.  Don't Copts eat it? 


There is a vegetarian version for Lent, by the way.
Logged

mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,644


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2013, 04:40:40 PM »

i didn't see it before, so probably it is not so popular in egypt.
(we do have this thing where we put minced meat with spices in a folded pitta bread and cook it in the oven.
i can't remember what it is called, but it is folded into a half circle.)
the armenian 'pizza' seems very similar to what is called 'iranian pizza' which is seen in north london and other areas, and is basically bread base with meat, as opposed to cheese.
i suggest mor ephrem conduct a research project on our behalf, involving a trip to an iranian restaurant.
 Smiley
if it turns out to be similar, i can imagine many benefits, such as inviting the iranians (and afghanis) to the armenian food festival, inviting the church people to iranian events and all sorts of interesting opportunities developing.

if it doesn't have cheese, i am not so interested personally, as i like dairy products too much!

also, anastasia, if you make falafel from mix, you are missing the true egyptian 'ta-e-miya' which is our word for falafel, and is made from white beans instead of chick peas (or half and half) which are soaked and then ground (or chopped in the food processor) without being cooked and then mixed with spices and garlic. at this stage all good mothers / grandparents freeze some mixture, so their children / God children who can't cook so well can take some to their homes later to cook!
then the mixture is shaped into balls (never with wheat or bread or eggs added!) and deep fried.

if we hadn't invented this, we would all die during lent.
 Wink
Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Online Online

Posts: 18,316


"Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee..."


WWW
« Reply #31 on: May 29, 2013, 07:31:14 PM »

i didn't see it before, so probably it is not so popular in egypt.
(we do have this thing where we put minced meat with spices in a folded pitta bread and cook it in the oven.
i can't remember what it is called, but it is folded into a half circle.)

Actually, I went to the local Coptic parish's festival this past weekend because I saw this on the food menu online and thought it was going to be the same thing as lahmajoon.  It was pleasant, but not the same thing.  Not by a long shot.  Sorry, Copts!  Tongue

Quote
the armenian 'pizza' seems very similar to what is called 'iranian pizza' which is seen in north london and other areas, and is basically bread base with meat, as opposed to cheese.
i suggest mor ephrem conduct a research project on our behalf, involving a trip to an iranian restaurant.
 Smiley
if it turns out to be similar, i can imagine many benefits, such as inviting the iranians (and afghanis) to the armenian food festival, inviting the church people to iranian events and all sorts of interesting opportunities developing.

I'd be happy to do this were I to receive funding!  I am a poor man, and the local Iranian restaurant is capital E expensive.

Edited to fix quotes.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 07:31:46 PM by Mor Ephrem » Logged

The Mor has spoken. Let his word endure unto the ages of ages.
Jovan
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Great Britain and Scandinavia
Posts: 515



« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2013, 05:28:22 AM »

This thread, when it came to food, is the best one ever made here ;P;P;P
Logged

“Belatedly I loved thee, O Beauty so ancient and so new, belatedly I loved thee. For see, thou wast within and I was without, and I sought thee out there."
Anastasia1
My warrior name is Beyoncé Pad Thai
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Occasionally traveling, Armenian.
Posts: 1,198



« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2013, 01:56:28 AM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   

Can't you make it yourself? Is there no equivalent of a baba or yiayia you know who does?
It's not that easy to make. Honestly, I don't know anyone who makes it at home with any regularity. Usually you depend on a local middle eastern or Armenian store that has it, or hope that your church women's guild makes it for sale.

This is what we're talking about:



Oh, it's like food porn...and on a Wednesday too!  You shouldn't have posted that!

LBK, I'm an amateur in the kitchen.  Expert dish-washer/cleaner, expert eater, but not so much a cook. 
Food porn, lol.
Logged

Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Cor 2:6)
William
Muted
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Posts: 4,354


« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2013, 02:37:32 AM »

Do they have falafels in Armenia? Falafels are good.

Anyways. Can we discuss people's experience in taking others to liturgy? Both of my parents have absolutely hated the Orthodox services they've been to. And not because they're super anti-Catholic Evangelicals with theological objections or anything. They just hate the chanting, length and standing. Yet on the internet I always see these stories about showing friends and family a liturgy and they love it and end up converting.
Logged

Apart from moral conduct, all that man thinks himself able to do in order to become acceptable to God is mere superstition and religious folly. - Immanuel Kant
qawe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 203


« Reply #35 on: May 31, 2013, 03:53:30 AM »

(we do have this thing where we put minced meat with spices in a folded pitta bread and cook it in the oven.
i can't remember what it is called, but it is folded into a half circle.)

7awawshi
Logged
KostaC
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Chicago & the Diocese of Washington (Orthodox Church in America)
Posts: 211


Chicago River Dyeing, March 15th, 20


« Reply #36 on: June 01, 2013, 01:19:51 AM »

She wants to go to church with me to spend time with me and attend church somewhere on Sunday while her parents are out of town and she will not be able to drive herself. I may be able to carpool to my church, but I am not sure, so I may be driving her and I to church.

The nearest Oriental churches are Coptic and Syriac. There is a Syriac a little farther from me that I have been to before and it appears there is a Syriac church closer to me that I just discovered (not sure if they will use any English in the sermon and I am not sure if the previous distinction is relevant info for those of you know who that I have had trouble attending my church with the accident and internship and still a little with the accident).

My friend is a Korean American in a contemporary style Presbyterian church and has never set foot in an Orthodox church before.  I don't want to completely freak her out. She has seen a Messianic festival with me, thinks that Catholics are like regular Christians with a little more emphasis on Mary.

I would be most comfortable with introducing her to the Armenian church, and that may be possible if I take painkiller. (I am starting to go half of the way through the day without meds before I feel anything.)

Please offer any advice on where we should go and how much I should explain to her.

I might be too late on this, but two weeks ago two of my best friends (who are Catholic) spent the night in my house and came to church with my Mother and I in the morning. My one friend was super eager to attend an Orthodox church for Divine Liturgy, so much so that I thought he almost wanted to convert and also because his Italian grandfather was incredibly domineering and drove his Greek wife into crypto-Orthodoxy and he maybe wanted to relive going to Divine Liturgy with his grandmother in secret all those years ago. My other friend is too lazy to go to church so when a free opportunity was presented that made it as easy as possible to attend some kind of worship service, he was pretty happy to take it.

Anyway, I mucked it all up by taking them to my home-parish, which is Greek speaking. Now this was not a case of "Oh those mean Greeks were rude to them because they were of a different ethnicity and faith." This was a case of them not being able to follow along with the liturgy because even though they had the booklet that has the Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostomos split on the page between Koine Greek and Modern English in front of them, they couldn't figure out the pace and kept getting lost. I also did two things wrong: I assumed too much and was too eager. I would whisper to them "if anything confuses you, feel free to ask me what anything means," and the one friend I thought was looking to convert comes from an extremely conservative Catholic family (and is both extremely conservative politically and religiously himself), so he took my whispers as insults to the liturgy at-hand because I was talking during church. I also assumed that I had gone through the run-down with them about rules for non-Orthodox attendees. Previously, I had taken our fourth best friend with me to Divine Liturgy one time (and in my pride I decided to sing with the cantors because I wanted to show him that I was studying to become a cantor instead of being a good friend and being there next to him and answering his questions) and I had told him everything he needed to know beforehand, so he knew facts about the Liturgy and that he could not take Holy Communion, but could take antidoro. So when my friends were preparing for communion and I whispered, "uh guys, what are you doing? We don't have walk-up blessings like you lot do," they said, "What do you mean what are we doing, we're getting ready for communion of course."

Well, needless to say, then it go awkward. The one friend who I thought to be a candidate for conversion got automatically offended and whispered to me, "but we're the same..." and from them on in changed his demeanour completely. Both of them had adopted our way of crossing themselves and would do anything that I and the rest of the congregation would do, like cross when the Theotokos was mentioned, bow when the priests bowed to us, said the Creed and the Our Father in English and in what little they could remember of both from their high school Archaic Greek class (they were taught bits of Liturgical Greek by their teachers, I'm not just confusing the two evolutions of the Greek language), etc. When communion was off the table, the former started muttering about now he'd have to go to church at night because his Sunday obligation wasn't fulfilled and he stopped doing everything that the congregation was doing. He even was reluctant to take antidoro after that and asked me, "do we have to?"  My other friend sat down non-belligerently and confusedly, but still continued to show respect and would make the sign of the cross when the rest of us did and whatnot. My former friend also got really catty because he didn't like the laidback attitude of the older congregation who would strike up smalltalk whilst the priest was preparing his notes for the sermon, and he expected absolute silence during transitions like this one. He also didn't know that we don't make up some arbitrary number for the age of receiving communion, so he was shocked when some lapsed parents brought their kids from a mnemosyno service and let their kids treat the Body of Christ like a communion piece of bread and he watched them drool all over it, pig out on it, and let the crumbs get all over in complete shock and horror. To be fair, I was also in complete shock and horror, but we're only 19, what do we know about kids?

When we got back home so the two could start packing to go home, my incredibly American and Irish-Catholic Father met the two outside when he pulled up from work and struck up a conversation with us. Now he asked them how church was, an innocent enough question. Only he's one of those people that thinks Christianity = Novus Ordo Catholicism and all those other Protestant fellows, and he sees Orthodoxy as a novelty, so the question in my opinion wasn't as innocent as he made it out to be because he was already starting to laugh before they even began to speak. The one friend who is definitely not looking into converting said, "It was nice, but typical Latin Catholicism is good enough for me!" I was heartbroken.

Both of them went on to later explain how they don't get why they couldn't get

So, my tips for you are:
1. Don't expect anything from this journey you're about to embark on (or have embarked on and my opinions are now rendered useless). You're not the one who will continue your friend on her life's journey through life, Christ is.
2. Make sure you prepare her as best as you can and explain that all Orthodox Christians practice communion for the faithful only.
3. Do not be afraid to be redundant. You cannot over explain anything.
4. If your friend draws unfair opinions about Orthodox Christianity, don't be surprised, but be polite and try to hint that quite possibly she's wrong and possibly being a bit western-centric.
Logged

«Μὴ μεριμνᾶτε λοιπὸν διὰ τὴν αὔριον, διὀτι ἡ αὐριανὴ ἡμέρα θὰ φροντίσῃ διὰ τὰ δικά της πράγματα. Φθάνει ἡ στεναχώρια τῆς ἡμέρας». Κατά Ματθαίον 6:34

"Bendito seja o que vem em nome do Senhor, o Senhor é Deus e se manifestou a nós."
pmpn8rGPT
Grammar Nazi in three languages.
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Eastern Orthodox (old calendarist)
Posts: 1,038


Proof that Russia won the Space Race.


« Reply #37 on: June 01, 2013, 01:30:07 AM »

aah, armenian food. yum.

One word: լահմաջուն. 

I haven't had it in years.  Every time I remember that sweet word, a yearning overtakes me.  And yet, I can't seem to find it to save my life.  It makes me weep.   

Can't you make it yourself? Is there no equivalent of a baba or yiayia you know who does?
It's not that easy to make. Honestly, I don't know anyone who makes it at home with any regularity. Usually you depend on a local middle eastern or Armenian store that has it, or hope that your church women's guild makes it for sale.

This is what we're talking about:



Oh, it's like food porn...and on a Wednesday too!  You shouldn't have posted that!

LBK, I'm an amateur in the kitchen.  Expert dish-washer/cleaner, expert eater, but not so much a cook. 
Food porn, lol.
I could be mistaken, but I remember hearing someone on TV/Radio describe the McRib as such.

Of course, Lahmajoon is much better than any of the disgusting crap McDonald's has ever poisoned America with.
Logged

"Tomorrow, I shall no longer be here."
-Nostradamus's last words.
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.137 seconds with 66 queries.