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Author Topic: Focusing on the Jewish Story of the New Testament  (Read 297 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jetavan
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« on: November 28, 2011, 09:08:21 PM »

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The book she [Dr. Amy-Jill Levine] has just edited with a Brandeis University professor, Marc Zvi Brettler, “The Jewish Annotated New Testament” (Oxford University Press), is an unusual scholarly experiment: an edition of the Christian holy book edited entirely by Jews. The volume includes notes and explanatory essays by 50 leading Jewish scholars, including Susannah Heschel, a historian and the daughter of the theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel; the Talmudist Daniel Boyarin; and Shaye J. D. Cohen, who teaches ancient Judaism at Harvard.
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So what does this New Testament include that a Christian volume might not? Consider Matthew 2, when the wise men, or magi, herald Jesus’s birth. In this edition, Aaron M. Gale, who has edited the Book of Matthew, writes in a footnote that “early Jewish readers may have regarded these Persian astrologers not as wise but as foolish or evil.” He is relying on the first-century Jewish philosopher Philo, who at one point calls Balaam, who in the Book of Numbers talks with a donkey, a “magos.”

Because the rationalist Philo uses the Greek word “magos” derisively — less a wise man than a donkey-whisperer — we might infer that at least some educated Jewish readers, like Philo, took a dim view of magi. This context helps explain some Jewish skepticism toward the Gospel of Matthew, but it could also attest to how charismatic Jesus must have been, to overcome such skepticism.
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Thirty years ago, when Dr. Levine was starting graduate school, an aunt asked her why she was reading the New Testament. “I said, ‘Have you read it?’ and she said, ‘No, why would I read that hateful, anti-Semitic disgusting book?’ ”

But Dr. Levine insists her aunt, like other Jews, had nothing to fear. “The more I study New Testament,” Dr. Levine said, “the better Jew I become.”
« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 09:09:57 PM by Jetavan » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2011, 10:07:23 PM »

Sorry but the whole wise men thing has actual ties with Zorastrianism IIRC. In fact it makes perfect sense to bring both gentile and Jewish people together with the coming of the Savior of the entire world.

I wonder how much worth Jews can bring to the NT in terms of annotations and edits.
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 10:27:25 PM »

They already edited the OT for their purposes, and now the NT? Sheesh. How meshugga can you get?
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