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Author Topic: The City (And It's Liberal/Cultural Marxist/Neo-Industrial Context)  (Read 1598 times) Average Rating: 0
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l0st
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« on: November 22, 2011, 12:16:05 AM »

I currently live in the biggest city in the United States and am counting the days to when I will leave for good to head back to my home region of the southeast U.S.

I have had such a hard time struggling to act like I enjoy this, like I agree with the moral decadence and depravity, the material obsession, and the very scary dogma which asserts under the guise of being "open-minded" that only a particular line of thought is acceptable. These city folk are depraved, perverted, and so completely lost. What's worse is that this mentality has all but overcome former agrarian regions, perverting them as well.

I am sorry to rant, but I simply can't understand how people, unless they have been brainwashed, could feel good living in such a putrid and vile place.

Cities are not natural, nor is industrialism.

Though if it weren't for my having come to this city, I may not be here now.

How do you feel about liberalism and major urban environments?
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 12:17:05 AM by l0st » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2011, 12:25:42 AM »

If it wasn't for cities, we surely would not have Christianity.  It would not have spread like it did if it wasn't for the cities of the ancient world.  If you think NYC, LA, or Chicago are bad, they don't hold a candle to what went on in places like Babylon, Alexandria, or even Constantinople in their heydays.

Where you see "depraved, perverted and...lost" people, I see opportunities to live as a Christian.

Where you see "brainwashed" folk, I see people who are grasping at straws, trying to find meaning in this world.

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« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2011, 12:27:42 AM »

I see.

For some reason I am inclined to associate the modern cities you mentioned with an environment that is not conducive to producing, maintaining, and developing religious sentiment or a religious mode of life. That doesn't mean that I cannot see that naturally there is need here, and much demand for all forms of religion.

I do not mean for this to turn into pissing contest on levels of faith.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 12:31:06 AM by l0st » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2011, 01:06:45 AM »

I'm not so sure what all the chunky terms in the thread title even mean.  Shocked I try not to get my information from demagogic talk shows.

The minute someone starts thinking, I'm better than all these other people, they're so eeeeevil... look out, I smell pride.

We are all tempted by it but we can't give in. If one starts to think that other people aren't worth saving, what does that make of your Christian witness?

It's one thing to move because you don't like the crowded space, or something like that. It's quite another to say that all these city people are icky, evil 'Marxists'  Huh Huh Huh and you've got to get away from them because they are allllllll perverts. What gives l0st the right to judge? I could just as easily say that about non-city folks, and suddenly everyone would be up in arms, saying I'm a stereotype-slinging jerk.

And it'd be tough to disagree with them.

 
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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2011, 02:28:31 AM »

I am still learning. That is all I can say in my defense.

Maybe it's better to think of "those chunky terms" in terms of simple dichotomies:

Agrarianism vs. Industrialism

Morality vs. Decadence

Cleanliness vs. Filth (material and psychic)

Natural vs. Artificial


...


These are my observations after having lived in both environments. Generalizations are just that: generalizations.

The city is generally filthy. "Progressive" approaches to society and politics as typically associated with both cultural and social/political Marxism I find to be extremely hypocritical. Maybe I should flesh that out a bit more, but I haven't the capacity to do so at this moment.

I find that while there are "bad," "perverted," "evil" people no matter where you go (just as there are good, righteous, etc.) there tends to be a higher ratio of those people who live what I understand as unnatural lives in urban environments. I understand urban living as anathema to a way of life that is conducive to a flourishing of spirituality and art. I see industrialism as an inherent factor in urbanization, which naturally results in decadence, spiritual and psychic depravity, and filthy habits.

I see these tendencies as artificially and painfully imposed on traditionally rural and agrarian communities. I see in these rural and agrarian/country communities greater tendency of a striving for simple morality, faith in religion, and an emphasis on values that I hold important - family, history, respect for nature and life, and for hard work and reaping the benefits of such. I see the processes and systems of industrialization and urbanization as rendering impotent the benefit of labor.

I do not believe this environment and what comes with it as conducive to allowing one to seek what's important in tradition, in the self, and in the natural world.

Yes, I find that people in the city are generally rude, artificially happy (higher levels of repressed despair than rural counterparts), absorbed in materialism, hypocritical. People don't appear to be as healthy as those people I know who live in rural areas, in spite of the conception of rural hicks as being less developed.

I think people need trees, mountain views, rivers, streams, animals, gardens, land, etc.

I have a hard time understanding that faith in God necessarily requires an open and uncritical acceptance of everyone and everything. I myself need saving.

I guess I am just talking nonsense. Please forgive my ranting.

And not once did I say I was better than anyone.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 02:42:46 AM by l0st » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2011, 03:23:36 AM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool
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« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2011, 03:42:44 AM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

If your Orthodoxy is at all as great as your metal bands, I'd love to come.
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2011, 03:58:02 AM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

If your Orthodoxy is at all as great as your metal bands, I'd love to come.

Sorry to disappoint you but our Orthodoxy is just about as lame as Black Metal of Cradle of Filth.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 03:58:35 AM by Alpo » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 10:44:06 AM »

Sorry to disappoint you but our Orthodoxy is just about as lame as Black Metal of Cradle of Filth.

I'd have to say that you're making the Finnish church sound awful. What are your main gripes?
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2011, 11:21:43 AM »

Sorry to disappoint you but our Orthodoxy is just about as lame as Black Metal of Cradle of Filth.

I'd have to say that you're making the Finnish church sound awful. What are your main gripes?

i have a feeling that one of the, might be that they celebrate Pascha on the date of Western Easter
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« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2011, 02:16:28 PM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

I wish that for you. You might come to appreciate the things you take for granted about your home and your people.


Could you afford living in downtown, midtown Manhattan or the UES? It's hardly worth the trouble in my experience to live in a horrible neighborhood in one of the outer boroughs and having to take an hour train ride one way to get into the city. Could you afford white neighborhoods, or you would have to settle for being an outsider in a heavily black, Orthodox Jew, or latino neighborhood? If you would, how long do you think you could live, especially with a female, having to deny yourself the basic privilege of going and coming whenever you please without having to worry about conflict? Would you be able to afford living near a park, or a museum, or would you have to settle for block upon block of rundown bodegas and crumbling apartments?

Do you enjoy being able to breathe fresh, clean air? Kiss that goodbye.

The novelty of talking with hallucinogenic mentally deranged homeless crackheads wears of very soon once you have to deal with it multiple times a day. Feces, trash, etc. all in the street. Constant loud noises, screaming, gunshots, etc.

My question to the bleeding hearts (especially the ones in the city who push their dogma on anyone they happen to come across): Why not take your White family with your little White children, leave your comfortably White neighborhood of Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, the UES and MOVE to Crown Heights, Brownsville, SpaHa, and join the community board? Why not LIVE with those groups of people if your idea of diversity is working, as opposed to making matters worse as the reality seems to point?

Do you want to be surrounded with men who don't know if they're men or girls or both? Or women who think they're men? Or creatures that are decidedly both and neither at the same time? I wouldn't want my children to be exposed to that nonsense on a constant basis, especially if it is being pushed on them as "normal." There's only so much that a soul can handle.

Though I do admit responses to my ramblings along the lines up "It would make me even MORE faithful" are noble. Maybe you should come see for yourself.

There's good everywhere you look if you want to find it. But I can't find anything generally good about this place. I've met nice people, enjoyed good food, had fun at the museums and in the parks....the novelty of that wears off pretty fast.

Come join the fracas! They'd love to have you!
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 02:19:04 PM by l0st » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2011, 02:21:08 PM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

If your Orthodoxy is at all as great as your metal bands, I'd love to come.

Sorry to disappoint you but our Orthodoxy is just about as lame as Black Metal of Cradle of Filth.

What makes you think it is any better in a place like New York City?  Huh

P.S. Lame is alive and well, and thriving I might add, in New York City. They go hand-in-hand.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 02:22:05 PM by l0st » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2011, 02:38:41 PM »

Sorry to disappoint you but our Orthodoxy is just about as lame as Black Metal of Cradle of Filth.

I'd have to say that you're making the Finnish church sound awful. What are your main gripes?

I wasn't that serious. While I constantly complain about many things in my little church I've grown to be rather content with her. Every church has her flaws and grass is not greener on the other side of the fence. We might have outrageous Gregorian calendar but hey, at least we don't have rows of pews in our churches and our bishops aren't KGB agents. angel
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« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2011, 03:23:33 PM »

My question to the bleeding hearts (especially the ones in the city who push their dogma on anyone they happen to come across): Why not take your White family with your little White children, leave your comfortably White neighborhood of Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, the UES and MOVE to Crown Heights, Brownsville, SpaHa, and join the community board? Why not LIVE with those groups of people if your idea of diversity is working, as opposed to making matters worse as the reality seems to point?

I'd recommend Chinatown, I've had some of the best food I've had anywhere there. And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters? Plus, you'll find that most Chinese in America, especially those who still live in Chinatown, are decidedly anti-Marxist...Marxism being the reason many of them were forced to leave their homes and come here in the first place.
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2011, 03:36:35 PM »

And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters?

I see lots of problems with that mode of thought, but simply put: it does not satisfy me.
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« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2011, 03:41:18 PM »

And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters?

I see lots of problems with that mode of thought, but simply put: it does not satisfy me.

Apparently not, but perhaps you expect too much. Can you say you're happy?
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2011, 05:10:55 PM »

And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters?

I see lots of problems with that mode of thought, but simply put: it does not satisfy me.

Apparently not, but perhaps you expect too much. Can you say you're happy?

I can say that I do not know what "happy" means. Is there a distinction between "Happy" and "happy"?

I can say that I was "happier" in a different environment. I can also admit that this maybe has much more to do with the self than environment, but I will not concede that environment plays no important role in facilitating aspects of development and awareness of the self and has no effect in terms of support on a way of life that entails certain modes of apprehension of or approaches to life (spirituality, discipline, etc.).

Why would I be happy in Chinatown if I am not a participating member in Chinese culture, do not identify with or relate to its history, traditions, and modes of life? Each peoples is unique and distinct because they were specifically made that way. Why shouldn't one who doesn't belong to that culture feel alienated? People of the same group share the same identity -- group conscience, if you will -- and it is based on such that individuals come to develop their own individual identity and place in the world. Chinatown may have decent food and drink and would be a interesting place to visit for a week, but beyond that it does nothing for me but make me realize that I do not share in any of it.

This is not to say that there is no such thing as Humanity, but I believe that Humanity is complete when each peoples are perfecting their individual mode of existence as a people. Distinct cultures, races, etc. are a beautiful thing because they are distinct. You destroy humanity when you force an amalgamation and deny the reality that each have their own unique identity.

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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2011, 05:19:23 PM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

If your Orthodoxy is at all as great as your metal bands, I'd love to come.

Dude, this just totally resolved all the Christological paradoxes for me.
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« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2011, 05:40:09 PM »

And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters?

I see lots of problems with that mode of thought, but simply put: it does not satisfy me.

Apparently not, but perhaps you expect too much. Can you say you're happy?

I can say that I do not know what "happy" means. Is there a distinction between "Happy" and "happy"?

I can say that I was "happier" in a different environment. I can also admit that this maybe has much more to do with the self than environment, but I will not concede that environment plays no important role in facilitating aspects of development and awareness of the self and has no effect in terms of support on a way of life that entails certain modes of apprehension of or approaches to life (spirituality, discipline, etc.).

Why would I be happy in Chinatown if I am not a participating member in Chinese culture, do not identify with or relate to its history, traditions, and modes of life? Each peoples is unique and distinct because they were specifically made that way. Why shouldn't one who doesn't belong to that culture feel alienated? People of the same group share the same identity -- group conscience, if you will -- and it is based on such that individuals come to develop their own individual identity and place in the world. Chinatown may have decent food and drink and would be a interesting place to visit for a week, but beyond that it does nothing for me but make me realize that I do not share in any of it.

This is not to say that there is no such thing as Humanity, but I believe that Humanity is complete when each peoples are perfecting their individual mode of existence as a people. Distinct cultures, races, etc. are a beautiful thing because they are distinct. You destroy humanity when you force an amalgamation and deny the reality that each have their own unique identity.

Certain places and certain things may be preferable to others, no doubt. But if you can't take pleasure in and enjoy the little things in life, the big things won't compensate. I love to spend a day, with clear skies, fishing along side a mountain lake; but if you're focused on mosquitoes and sunburn, you're not going to enjoy yourself no matter how beautiful the view. Take pleasure in the little things, the rest will follow.

As for the value of one's own culture, I think you are talking more about what makes you comfortable, not what makes you happy. In my experience, the two are very rarely one and the same. After I finished college, I ended up moving back to my hometown and worked there for a couple years; it was very comfortable, they were my people, I fully understood and fit in culturally, it was home. But, that was probably the most unhappy time of my life. Had I known what I know now, I would never have gone back. It's new experiences that makes life worth living. You can never go back, so it's important to learn to enjoy moving forward, with all the awkwardness and uncertainty that entails.
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« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2011, 05:51:30 PM »

And as long as you have good food and good drink...what else matters?

I see lots of problems with that mode of thought, but simply put: it does not satisfy me.

Apparently not, but perhaps you expect too much. Can you say you're happy?

I can say that I do not know what "happy" means. Is there a distinction between "Happy" and "happy"?

I can say that I was "happier" in a different environment. I can also admit that this maybe has much more to do with the self than environment, but I will not concede that environment plays no important role in facilitating aspects of development and awareness of the self and has no effect in terms of support on a way of life that entails certain modes of apprehension of or approaches to life (spirituality, discipline, etc.).

Why would I be happy in Chinatown if I am not a participating member in Chinese culture, do not identify with or relate to its history, traditions, and modes of life? Each peoples is unique and distinct because they were specifically made that way. Why shouldn't one who doesn't belong to that culture feel alienated? People of the same group share the same identity -- group conscience, if you will -- and it is based on such that individuals come to develop their own individual identity and place in the world. Chinatown may have decent food and drink and would be a interesting place to visit for a week, but beyond that it does nothing for me but make me realize that I do not share in any of it.

This is not to say that there is no such thing as Humanity, but I believe that Humanity is complete when each peoples are perfecting their individual mode of existence as a people. Distinct cultures, races, etc. are a beautiful thing because they are distinct. You destroy humanity when you force an amalgamation and deny the reality that each have their own unique identity.

Certain places and certain things may be preferable to others, no doubt. But if you can't take pleasure in and enjoy the little things in life, the big things won't compensate. I love to spend a day, with clear skies, fishing along side a mountain lake; but if you're focused on mosquitoes and sunburn, you're not going to enjoy yourself no matter how beautiful the view. Take pleasure in the little things, the rest will follow.

As for the value of one's own culture, I think you are talking more about what makes you comfortable, not what makes you happy. In my experience, the two are very rarely one and the same. After I finished college, I ended up moving back to my hometown and worked there for a couple years; it was very comfortable, they were my people, I fully understood and fit in culturally, it was home. But, that was probably the most unhappy time of my life. Had I known what I know now, I would never have gone back. It's new experiences that makes life worth living. You can never go back, so it's important to learn to enjoy moving forward, with all the awkwardness and uncertainty that entails.

Thanks for your patient reply. Your advice will not be taken lightly. I'm almost at the point where I must decide (in a matter of weeks -- finishing college) if I want to stay in the city, or move back to my home region (not necessarily my home town).

The most unhappy time of my life has been here, in this city. Granted, this is due to choices I have made that brought me here in the first place, but it's been a struggle. The environment has not been for me conducive to academic study or self study. I want to spend what time I have left learning from my parents before they are gone, particularly my father (who is skilled in knowledgeable in many practical arts and agrarian life and the natural world), and making up for some of the damage I did as a child. If I run away to become absorbed in the diversity of life experience (as my mother wishes for me -- and probably more for herself) I will miss out on many things. I'd also like to be a more active presence in my little brother's life as well, he basically grew up without a brother (the 9 years age difference has a lot to do with it). This doesn't mean I have to live at home or in my home town, but I plan on seeking work closer to home in order that I may have the opportunity to accomplish some of this. I want to learn to appreciate the simple, and my heart is longing to be back in the mountains again. I haven't seen green grass or trees or mountains in almost two years. I also do genuinely miss the people of the South. They're a bit more temperate and easy going, and yes, I feel like I relate to them...much more than I relate to anyone from the urban Northeast.

Even when I allow myself to enjoy the simple pleasures (the niceties of varying culture, the easy access to world class museums and art) and ignore the mosquitoes i.e., the filth, the noise, the clutter, the entropy, the hard shells, I do not find enough there to make it worthwhile.

As Ronnie Van Zant said: To each his own. What's right for me might not be right for you.
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« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2012, 02:36:56 AM »

I live in a semi rural city area, and I lived out in the boonies and in the city. I found the more affluent farm towns around me the people are snooby as hell. Yeah the city is bad , but for as nice and clean as the affluent farm areas are , they lack the basics like charity .
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« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2012, 11:25:58 AM »

The biggest problem with cities is that they are filled with people.
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« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2012, 11:48:25 AM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool
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« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2012, 12:02:51 PM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

Man you are lucky.
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« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2012, 05:48:19 PM »

I currently live in the biggest city in the United States and am counting the days to when I will leave for good to head back to my home region of the southeast U.S.

I have had such a hard time struggling to act like I enjoy this, like I agree with the moral decadence and depravity, the material obsession, and the very scary dogma which asserts under the guise of being "open-minded" that only a particular line of thought is acceptable. These city folk are depraved, perverted, and so completely lost. What's worse is that this mentality has all but overcome former agrarian regions, perverting them as well.

I am sorry to rant, but I simply can't understand how people, unless they have been brainwashed, could feel good living in such a putrid and vile place.

Cities are not natural, nor is industrialism.

Though if it weren't for my having come to this city, I may not be here now.

How do you feel about liberalism and major urban environments?

I hear ya, L0st. I've kind of tried all of the extremes from living in a tent on a remote island on the west coast to living in downtown Seoul. I've lived in several Canadian and Asian cities, and spent 5 months living in a van out in the Canadian Rockies, and several more months tree-planting (and living in a tent) up north. There are definitely different things one can learn (and practice) in different kinds of places, but I generally find big, modern cities to be rather soul-sucking. Most modern buildings are cold, steel rectangles, each one looking essentially the same as the others around it (except for the corporate brands on top). So much has been mass produced for greatest financial gain with the most minimal investment possible. The condition of being constantly surrounded by noise, commotion, fixation with celebrity, gross materialism, commercialism, experimentation, superficiality, titillation, disparity of wealth, etc. certainly makes St. James' mandate to "keep oneself from being polluted by the world" very difficult. From my experience, having all of the diverse options and pleasures at one's disposal makes people addicted to novelty, to new experiences, and to instant gratification. This contributes to peoples' inability to concentrate, to stick to commitments, to be consistent, and so on. I say this from experience, too, not pointing any fingers. I can witness this happening often with myself. Crowded cities affect people. From my experience, I definitely feel more connected to other humans, nature, and God when living in smaller populations with plenty of nature around.

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« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2012, 06:06:33 PM »

I currently live in the biggest city in the United States and am counting the days to when I will leave for good to head back to my home region of the southeast U.S.

I have had such a hard time struggling to act like I enjoy this, like I agree with the moral decadence and depravity, the material obsession, and the very scary dogma which asserts under the guise of being "open-minded" that only a particular line of thought is acceptable. These city folk are depraved, perverted, and so completely lost. What's worse is that this mentality has all but overcome former agrarian regions, perverting them as well.

I am sorry to rant, but I simply can't understand how people, unless they have been brainwashed, could feel good living in such a putrid and vile place.

Cities are not natural, nor is industrialism.

Though if it weren't for my having come to this city, I may not be here now.

How do you feel about liberalism and major urban environments?

I hear ya, L0st. I've kind of tried all of the extremes from living in a tent on a remote island on the west coast to living in downtown Seoul. I've lived in several Canadian and Asian cities, and spent 5 months living in a van out in the Canadian Rockies, and several more months tree-planting (and living in a tent) up north. There are definitely different things one can learn (and practice) in different kinds of places, but I generally find big, modern cities to be rather soul-sucking. Most modern buildings are cold, steel rectangles, each one looking essentially the same as the others around it (except for the corporate brands on top). So much has been mass produced for greatest financial gain with the most minimal investment possible. The condition of being constantly surrounded by noise, commotion, fixation with celebrity, gross materialism, commercialism, experimentation, superficiality, titillation, disparity of wealth, etc. certainly makes St. James' mandate to "keep oneself from being polluted by the world" very difficult. From my experience, having all of the diverse options and pleasures at one's disposal makes people addicted to novelty, to new experiences, and to instant gratification. This contributes to peoples' inability to concentrate, to stick to commitments, to be consistent, and so on. I say this from experience, too, not pointing any fingers. I can witness this happening often with myself. Crowded cities affect people. From my experience, I definitely feel more connected to other humans, nature, and God when living in smaller populations with plenty of nature around.


I think you would love Copenhagen. We even have a law which forbids the building of scyscrapers in most parts of the city.
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« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2012, 12:43:23 PM »

I hate the city life. The place I live has about 80,000 and thats too many.

PP
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« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2012, 02:07:11 PM »

Maybe we could switch places? I'd love to live in the largest city of US. You could have my Finnish city with it's 70 000 or so inhabitants in heartland of Finnish Orthodoxy. Cool

I wish that for you. You might come to appreciate the things you take for granted about your home and your people.


Could you afford living in downtown, midtown Manhattan or the UES? It's hardly worth the trouble in my experience to live in a horrible neighborhood in one of the outer boroughs and having to take an hour train ride one way to get into the city. Could you afford white neighborhoods, or you would have to settle for being an outsider in a heavily black, Orthodox Jew, or latino neighborhood? If you would, how long do you think you could live, especially with a female, having to deny yourself the basic privilege of going and coming whenever you please without having to worry about conflict? Would you be able to afford living near a park, or a museum, or would you have to settle for block upon block of rundown bodegas and crumbling apartments?

Do you enjoy being able to breathe fresh, clean air? Kiss that goodbye.

The novelty of talking with hallucinogenic mentally deranged homeless crackheads wears of very soon once you have to deal with it multiple times a day. Feces, trash, etc. all in the street. Constant loud noises, screaming, gunshots, etc.

My question to the bleeding hearts (especially the ones in the city who push their dogma on anyone they happen to come across): Why not take your White family with your little White children, leave your comfortably White neighborhood of Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, the UES and MOVE to Crown Heights, Brownsville, SpaHa, and join the community board? Why not LIVE with those groups of people if your idea of diversity is working, as opposed to making matters worse as the reality seems to point?

Do you want to be surrounded with men who don't know if they're men or girls or both? Or women who think they're men? Or creatures that are decidedly both and neither at the same time? I wouldn't want my children to be exposed to that nonsense on a constant basis, especially if it is being pushed on them as "normal." There's only so much that a soul can handle.

Though I do admit responses to my ramblings along the lines up "It would make me even MORE faithful" are noble. Maybe you should come see for yourself.

There's good everywhere you look if you want to find it. But I can't find anything generally good about this place. I've met nice people, enjoyed good food, had fun at the museums and in the parks....the novelty of that wears off pretty fast.

Come join the fracas! They'd love to have you!

I work in NYC, live in NJ, and have lived in Atlanta.

Yes, there is a higher concentration of bad things in NYC then say, Schenectady, NY or Macon, GA, but that's because there are more people there. However, there is also a higher concentration of charities, churches, and people doing good works.

Look at all the opportunities you have to minister and show Christ's love by being surrounded by 8 million souls who need Him!

I know the City can be wearing on you. The constant noise and lights can be grating on even the most patient of individuals.

I suggest you read the life of St. John Maximovitch, and see how he took advantage of different opportunities to minister while living in the cities of Parish, Shanghai, San Francisco (and I also believe NYC -- but I could be wrong on the last part.)

Look at how the Apostle Paul traveled from city to city to spread the Good News of Our Lord.

I would be hesitant to look at an entire populous as evil. Each one of those 8 million people were created in the image and likeness of God. They have had life breathed into them by the Almighty Himself, just as you have. Every good and perfect gift is from above; they are God's creation. Although they may be doing things that are sinful and evil, they are still something good because they are from God. Rather than judge them, pray for them and pray for yourself.

Except for the two years I lived in Atlanta, I lived near NY my whole life. I can honestly say I love it. I find the rush of the people invigorating.

I do not see it as filthy, evil, and bad. I see it as energizing, beautiful, and brilliant.

We're both looking at the same city; it's all a matter of perception my friend.
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« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2012, 02:08:30 PM »

I think you would love Copenhagen. We even have a law which forbids the building of scyscrapers in most parts of the city.

Washington DC is like that; no building can be higher than the Capitol building, so that wherever you are in the city, you can look up and see the Capitol Building. It's pretty cool.
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« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2012, 02:10:52 PM »

Quote
I think you would love Copenhagen. We even have a law which forbids the building of scyscrapers in most parts of the city.

What a great law! I just looked at some pictures of Copenhagen. Looks very nice.

As beautiful and vast as Canada's nature is, the cities, more and more, and generally speaking, tend to lack the character and charm that European cities seem to have (from  what I've gathered from what others have told or shown me... never been there, myself). I swear I've been on the exact same street in about 10 different Canadian cities: Tim Horton's, Wendy's, McDonald's, Walmart, Mark's Work Wearhouse, Futureshop, Superstore, another Tim Horton's, A & W, Canadian Tire, 7-11, Home Depot, the Brick, Sportchek... another Tim Horton's. Bleh. Convenient, but soulless.
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"The kingdom of heaven is virtuous life, just as the torment of hell is passionate habits." - St. Gregory of Sinai

"Our idea of God tells us more about ourselves than about Him." - Thomas Merton
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« Reply #30 on: April 11, 2012, 10:03:45 PM »

The biggest problem with cities is that they are filled with people.

Your perspicaciousness is matched only by your perfunctoricity.
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« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2012, 05:39:39 AM »

The biggest problem with cities is that they are filled with people.

Your perspicaciousness is matched only by your perfunctoricity.

Oh no....BIG WORDS!
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« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2012, 05:51:50 AM »

I'm from California where we are notorious for our cities and I have to disagree with you. Like all places, cities have their good people and they have their bad people.The fact that so many of us are bad seems to show that if anything, we need God more, and you should be trying to spread Orthodoxy in whichever way God sees fit for you in your situation. The city is also a beautiful place in our own strange way. The city is art--the whole urban scene is art; it is all beautiful. Have you ever seen some of the graffiti masterpieces people in ghetto neighborhoods paint? Absolutely amazing. The city inspires me.
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