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Author Topic: Wearing Rosaries  (Read 1482 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: January 14, 2012, 05:23:57 AM »

I was recently having a convo with a (Catholic) friend about people who where rosaries. He is more opposed to it than I am (at least with regards to Catholics). What are your thoughts on this?
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2012, 06:08:58 AM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy), I would think that rosaries should be treated like cheap trinkets that one might pick up in a kitschy tourist shop in Mexico, which is still a step up from the Quran, which should only be used for burning. Roll Eyes





(Actually, since wearing a rosary somewhere on your clothing, especially around the belt, is something that I typically see Catholic monks do, out of respect for their vocation, I think people probably ought not wear rosaries. Most of my Catholic friends keep them in their pockets or purses, and almost never keep them readily visible.)
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2012, 09:05:30 AM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy),

Wow.
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2012, 09:59:01 AM »

I feel rosaries or any religious jewelry such as cross necklaces  should be an expression of your faith, not just a decoration.  It doesn't mean that a rosary or necklace shouldn't be beautiful, but not be treated in the same manner as a set of ear rings or a Rolex watch for that matter. It should not be a fashion statement.
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2012, 10:36:59 AM »

I keep my prayer rope in my pocket. When I use it, I arrange my day to prevent being disturbed or having interuptions.

When people do see me using it despite my best attempts to not be disturbed, they do ask questions and of course I will answer them. But I would not wear my prayer rope 'out in the open' as I would a belt or my shoes.

But that's just me. Other people may be called to do other things.
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2012, 11:43:32 AM »

Rosaries are meant to be used for prayer, not fashion. It seems that it has become a huge fashion statement among the hip hop crowd since many rappers wear them. I see a lot of people at my college wear them as well since they are most likely fans of the rappers who they see wear them.
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2012, 11:53:31 AM »

I keep my prayer rope in my pocket. When I use it, I arrange my day to prevent being disturbed or having interuptions.

When people do see me using it despite my best attempts to not be disturbed, they do ask questions and of course I will answer them. But I would not wear my prayer rope 'out in the open' as I would a belt or my shoes.
Not that my approval counts for anything, but I think this is the best approach if one is not a monastic, Orthodox or Catholic. Certainly one can use a prayer rope or rosary, but walking around with it on your wrist (or neck if it's a rosary) if you're not a monk seems a bit like standing on the corner praying in the hopes of being seen.

And perhaps all of this is just colored by my own spiritual failings, but I definitely see the value in praying in the closet...It keeps you humble as well.

But I think what the wise priest said bears repeating:

Quote
But that's just me. Other people may be called to do other things.

As far as wearing rosaries as an accessory is concerned (and I have seen plenty of that lately), well...Maybe it will have a positive effect on the wearer. If nothing else, they have to look at an explicitly Christian symbol every time they look down.
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2012, 11:54:33 AM »

Rosaries are meant to be used for prayer, not fashion. It seems that it has become a huge fashion statement among the hip hop crowd since many rappers wear them. I see a lot of people at my college wear them as well since they are most likely fans of the rappers who they see wear them.
Some gangsters wear them for protection. I suppose that is a valid use.
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2012, 01:53:38 PM »

I was taught to never, ever wear the rosary. I went into a deli once, and a guy behind the counter was wearing one around his neck. I almost wanted to say something to him, but I didn't.
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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2012, 03:40:14 PM »

Rosaries are meant to be used for prayer, not fashion. It seems that it has become a huge fashion statement among the hip hop crowd since many rappers wear them. I see a lot of people at my college wear them as well since they are most likely fans of the rappers who they see wear them.
Some gangsters wear them for protection. I suppose that is a valid use.

Not being a gangster is also a valid form of protection.
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« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2012, 04:07:08 PM »

I keep my prayer rope in my pocket. When I use it, I arrange my day to prevent being disturbed or having interuptions.

When people do see me using it despite my best attempts to not be disturbed, they do ask questions and of course I will answer them. But I would not wear my prayer rope 'out in the open' as I would a belt or my shoes.

But that's just me. Other people may be called to do other things.

This seems to me to be the best approach to artifacts of the spiritual life.  Wearing a cross, to me, is a bit like wearing a habit.  But neither the cross nor the habit is a fashion statement as such.  The same should apply to implements of prayer and contemplation.  Not only that but our prayer lives should not be "warn on our sleeves" so to speak. 

I was raised up in the Carmelite tradition where one does not display the fact that theirs is explicitly and formally a vocation of unceasing prayer.

However, I often will wrap a prayer rope around my wrist in a way that it sort of disappears into my sleeve.  I take it out where there is a moment and do not try to hide the fact that I am praying...if that would serve to draw more attention to me.

Those things are a matter of good judgment...I was once on a bus from NY to PA where there happened to be a group of Carmelite nuns.  They quietly chanted the office of Vespers.  It was very beautiful and you could hear a pin drop in the rest of the bus.  That silence hung around a long time after they had finished.

As to the wearing of a rosary around the neck?  I would discourage it and particularly since it is often done by those whose lives are torn by sin in a very active way.  Implements of prayer should never be used or seen as a talisman.
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« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2012, 04:20:39 PM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy),

Wow.
I sure hope that you read the statement below that one. One of them was meant to be taken seriously, the other wasn't.
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2012, 04:30:06 PM »

I keep my prayer rope in my pocket. When I use it, I arrange my day to prevent being disturbed or having interuptions.

When people do see me using it despite my best attempts to not be disturbed, they do ask questions and of course I will answer them. But I would not wear my prayer rope 'out in the open' as I would a belt or my shoes.

But that's just me. Other people may be called to do other things.

This seems to me to be the best approach to artifacts of the spiritual life.  Wearing a cross, to me, is a bit like wearing a habit.  But neither the cross nor the habit is a fashion statement as such.  The same should apply to implements of prayer and contemplation.  Not only that but our prayer lives should not be "warn on our sleeves" so to speak.

Would you say that it would be ok for people to wear a cross around the neck, but keep it hidden under their shirts? This is what a lot of the Greeks at my parish do.

Quote
I was raised up in the Carmelite tradition where one does not display the fact that theirs is explicitly and formally a vocation of unceasing prayer.

However, I often will wrap a prayer rope around my wrist in a way that it sort of disappears into my sleeve.  I take it out where there is a moment and do not try to hide the fact that I am praying...if that would serve to draw more attention to me.

I didn't know that about Carmelite nuns. How exactly do they hide their vocation? I would assume that they still wear habits, but hide objects for prayer, like rosaries.

Quote
Those things are a matter of good judgment...I was once on a bus from NY to PA where there happened to be a group of Carmelite nuns.  They quietly chanted the office of Vespers.  It was very beautiful and you could hear a pin drop in the rest of the bus.  That silence hung around a long time after they had finished.

As to the wearing of a rosary around the neck?  I would discourage it and particularly since it is often done by those whose lives are torn by sin in a very active way.  Implements of prayer should never be used or seen as a talisman.

I agree with both of these paragraphs.
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2012, 05:00:23 PM »

Quote from: Cognomen
Not being a gangster is also a valid form of protection.

Bravissimo.  Smiley
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« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2012, 05:01:49 PM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy), I would think that rosaries should be treated like cheap trinkets that one might pick up in a kitschy tourist shop in Mexico, which is still a step up from the Quran, which should only be used for burning. Roll Eyes

Could you at least save the self-righteous satire for when someone has actually posted the opinion you're satirizing in the thread?
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« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2012, 05:05:23 PM »

I think it's okay for someone who regularly prays the rosary to wear it. Otherwise their salvation would probably be better off if they didn't make a mockery of it by using it as a cool piece of jewelry.
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« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2012, 05:08:31 PM »

I think it's okay for someone who regularly prays the rosary to wear it. Otherwise their salvation would probably be better off if they didn't make a mockery of it by using it as a cool piece of jewelry.

Good idea.
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« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2012, 05:23:56 PM »

I wear my Meqaturia (my prayer beads with the Ethiopian Cross) around my neck at all times, unless I'm showering. I take it off to use it for prayer, and I sleep with it in my hands. I don't wear it as a fashion statement, but rather as an expression of my faith and as a constant self-reminder that Christ is with me, and to hopefully help me be more mindful of prayer. Wearing it has also helped me avoid many temptations. Others may think it's ostentatious or conspicuously pious, but it helps me and I would feel naked without it. But that's just me.





Selam
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« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2012, 05:29:53 PM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy), I would think that rosaries should be treated like cheap trinkets that one might pick up in a kitschy tourist shop in Mexico, which is still a step up from the Quran, which should only be used for burning. Roll Eyes

Could you at least save the self-righteous satire for when someone has actually posted the opinion you're satirizing in the thread?

You are mistaken. I have been shown the true light after reading  St. Basil's first canonical epistle. I'm going to go find the nearest Catholic tabernacle so that I can trample their graceless azymes under my feet. Nobody should find that disturbing, since they're just crackers.
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« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2012, 06:27:47 PM »

I wear my Meqaturia (my prayer beads with the Ethiopian Cross) around my neck at all times, unless I'm showering.

Why do you take it off when showering?
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« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2012, 06:33:13 PM »

I wear my Meqaturia (my prayer beads with the Ethiopian Cross) around my neck at all times, unless I'm showering.

Why do you take it off when showering?

Merely to preserve it. Some of the beads are wooden, and the rope itself will surely deteriorate from repeated exposure to water.


Selam
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« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2012, 06:38:14 PM »

I keep my prayer rope in my pocket. When I use it, I arrange my day to prevent being disturbed or having interuptions.

When people do see me using it despite my best attempts to not be disturbed, they do ask questions and of course I will answer them. But I would not wear my prayer rope 'out in the open' as I would a belt or my shoes.

But that's just me. Other people may be called to do other things.

This seems to me to be the best approach to artifacts of the spiritual life.  Wearing a cross, to me, is a bit like wearing a habit.  But neither the cross nor the habit is a fashion statement as such.  The same should apply to implements of prayer and contemplation.  Not only that but our prayer lives should not be "warn on our sleeves" so to speak.

Would you say that it would be ok for people to wear a cross around the neck, but keep it hidden under their shirts? This is what a lot of the Greeks at my parish do.

Quote
I was raised up in the Carmelite tradition where one does not display the fact that theirs is explicitly and formally a vocation of unceasing prayer.

However, I often will wrap a prayer rope around my wrist in a way that it sort of disappears into my sleeve.  I take it out where there is a moment and do not try to hide the fact that I am praying...if that would serve to draw more attention to me.

I didn't know that about Carmelite nuns. How exactly do they hide their vocation? I would assume that they still wear habits, but hide objects for prayer, like rosaries.

Quote
Those things are a matter of good judgment...I was once on a bus from NY to PA where there happened to be a group of Carmelite nuns.  They quietly chanted the office of Vespers.  It was very beautiful and you could hear a pin drop in the rest of the bus.  That silence hung around a long time after they had finished.

As to the wearing of a rosary around the neck?  I would discourage it and particularly since it is often done by those whose lives are torn by sin in a very active way.  Implements of prayer should never be used or seen as a talisman.

I agree with both of these paragraphs.

The reference here to Carmelites is to lay Carmelites and third order nuns.  First order are the friars.  Second order are the cloistered nuns who have very little trouble hiding from the world  Smiley....and my reference was to tertiaries who are either religious or lay.  For the religious tertiaries think: affiliate religious communities in Carmelite spirituality.  You would not find cloistered nuns riding a bus...except in very unusual circumstances.  I didn't note all that when I was writing the first note so thanks for the questions.

As for the cross?  I would say that for the layman or woman it is best to keep the cross hidden...not buried, but not worn so as to be mistaken for a piece of jewelery.  I wear a three bar cross and I don't try to hide it but I don't wear it out on top of my clothing either...so generally you can see I wear a cross in the summertime and in the winter it tends to be more hidden.  I carry my prayer rope on my wrist in an easy way so as not to draw attention.  I carry a brown scapular on my person...from time to time.  But no one ever sees it.  Sometimes I don't even see it...meaning it's moved on to some other soul good enough to pick it up from where I dropped it...God willing.

A nun or priest or monk or hieararch can wear symbols of the faith in an outward way more readily because when combined with a habit or clerical garb the symbols are less likely to be viewed as fashion statements.

I live as a hermit, for example, but I don't adopt a habit of any kind.  What I do is tend simply to dress in monochrome browns, greens or dark blues in fall and winter, or white or moss greens in the summer.  Never any make-up.  Hair short and neat...I try to keep it neat anyway.  I cut my own hair.  Now and then a stranger on the street will size me up and down and ask "Are you a nun?"...I generally laugh and say "Not yet"....So what you are comes out very often without large signs or wonders... Wink

M.



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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2012, 06:46:55 PM »

I keep my prayer rope on my wrist but under the sleeve.  

My clothes tend to match my prayer rope, so I can slip it out and pray with it discreetly.
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2012, 08:51:56 PM »

Since rosary beads are Sacramentals (assuming they are blessed) I do not think that they should be worn, although I have seen Catholic youth groups who all wear them around their necks as a sign of their devotion. I just personally do not like the idea of using rosary beads as an accessory.
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« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2012, 08:56:20 PM »

Wyatt (or any Catholic),

Could you explain the difference between a sacrament and a sacramental? I'm familiar with the numbering of sacraments at 7... how many sacramentals type things are there?
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2012, 09:17:35 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.
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« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2012, 09:31:56 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.

Ahh, ok, thanks Smiley  If you don't mind me asking a follow up, are there degrees of power/helpfulness? For example, if you have a rosary used by a saint, is it considered more holy than one that's just blessed and has just been used by yourself?
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« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2012, 09:38:44 PM »

Since Catholics are without grace (and therefore they have no potential for holiness while they remain outside of Holy Orthodoxy), I would think that rosaries should be treated like cheap trinkets that one might pick up in a kitschy tourist shop in Mexico, which is still a step up from the Quran, which should only be used for burning. Roll Eyes
Haha this is awesome.
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« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2012, 10:06:37 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.

Ahh, ok, thanks Smiley  If you don't mind me asking a follow up, are there degrees of power/helpfulness? For example, if you have a rosary used by a saint, is it considered more holy than one that's just blessed and has just been used by yourself?

That would be magic not grace... Wink
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« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2012, 10:48:01 PM »

My grandparents were pious Catholics.  They said that one should never ever wear a rosary like jewelery.

We even have a teacher at school (pious Catholic) who will go up to people who wear them and say "Why do you wear this?  Do you think it's jewelery?!"


I find that it's mostly a Mexican cultural tradition.  That's who do it in my school.  Different colors of beads also mean affiliation with different gangs.
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« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2012, 10:52:26 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.

Ahh, ok, thanks Smiley  If you don't mind me asking a follow up, are there degrees of power/helpfulness? For example, if you have a rosary used by a saint, is it considered more holy than one that's just blessed and has just been used by yourself?

That would be magic not grace... Wink

But are not sacramentals less than sacraments? Or have I misunderstood?
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« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2012, 11:10:30 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.

Ahh, ok, thanks Smiley  If you don't mind me asking a follow up, are there degrees of power/helpfulness? For example, if you have a rosary used by a saint, is it considered more holy than one that's just blessed and has just been used by yourself?
While I don't believe that the Church has a specific teaching on this, I personally believe that an item used by a Saint would be special. However, in addition to being a Sacramental if it was an item personally used and touched by a Saint, that would also make it a second class relic. See here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relic#Roman_Catholic_classification_and_prohibitions
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« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2012, 11:17:00 PM »

Thanks, I didn't realise there were those kind of distinctions in relics either Smiley
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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2012, 12:10:01 AM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!
I was recently having a convo with a (Catholic) friend about people who where rosaries. He is more opposed to it than I am (at least with regards to Catholics). What are your thoughts on this?

I don't wear a Rosary, but I carry one with me in my bag, and I say the "Lord Have Mercies" and the Jesus Prayer on them, and sometimes just carry them in my hand during prayer and I admit they keep me focused.  A sister gave them to me from her trip to Mexico City and I feel they are blessed and positively energized.  Literally miracles have happened when I've had them near by..

In the Ethiopian Tradition we have our own prayer beads, but some Ethiopians also use the Rosary like I do because they are local and available.  Here in LA A LOT of folks are wearing Rosaries, and none of them Catholic, but I feel most are still sincere, and that is another LA miracle in my opinion..



stay blessed,
habte selassie
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« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2012, 12:11:57 AM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!
I was recently having a convo with a (Catholic) friend about people who where rosaries. He is more opposed to it than I am (at least with regards to Catholics). What are your thoughts on this?

I don't wear a Rosary, but I carry one with me in my bag, and I say the "Lord Have Mercies" and the Jesus Prayer on them, and sometimes just carry them in my hand during prayer and I admit they keep me focused.  A sister gave them to me from her trip to Mexico City and I feel they are blessed and positively energized.  Literally miracles have happened when I've had them near by..

In the Ethiopian Tradition we have our own prayer beads, but some Ethiopians also use the Rosary like I do because they are local and available.  Here in LA A LOT of folks are wearing Rosaries, and none of them Catholic, but I feel most are still sincere, and that is another LA miracle in my opinion..



stay blessed,
habte selassie

Yes, I have been to LA (LOVED IT!!!) and I saw this, too.
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« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2012, 03:44:09 AM »

Gebre Menfes Kidus, lovely Meqaturia.

Is putting it on the mirror of a car much better?
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« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2012, 03:58:15 AM »

Gebre Menfes Kidus, lovely Meqaturia.

Is putting it on the mirror of a car much better?


I'm not sure. I don't put it on the mirror of my car. But maybe if somebady decided to do so they would do it in order to have it handy for prayer. I don't know. I don't judge people regarding this matter. As long as people do understand that the purpose of these things is for prayer rather than fashion, I think that's the important thing.


Selam
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« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2012, 03:08:19 PM »

Sacramentals are blessed objects that, while not by any means equal to the Sacraments, still aide us in our walk with Christ. Examples of Sacramentals would be rosaries, holy water, scapulars, miraculous medals, icons, etc.

Ahh, ok, thanks Smiley  If you don't mind me asking a follow up, are there degrees of power/helpfulness? For example, if you have a rosary used by a saint, is it considered more holy than one that's just blessed and has just been used by yourself?

That would be magic not grace... Wink

But are not sacramentals less than sacraments? Or have I misunderstood?

Ranking is not a necessary element of distinction.

The seven great sacraments are distinguished by the fact that they are "instituted by Christ"...

The Church has elevated certain elements of prayer and liturgy and para-liturgical practice as being worthy of imparting grace by the blessing of the Church, rather than by divine dispensation...although some of the implements of grace, such as the brown scapular for example, have been imparted though saintly dispensation...

There's no ranking involved.
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