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Author Topic: New converts: How much do you share with your priest?  (Read 969 times) Average Rating: 0
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Mariama
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« on: October 19, 2011, 09:26:05 PM »

Another stupid question ahead... please be gentle. 

Prior to coming into Orthodoxy, my husband and I were in a (Byzantine Catholic) parish where we felt rather uncomfortable talking to the priest about anything, but now, as newcomers to Orthodoxy, questions arise.  For me, the questions seem to come up almost on an hourly basis, but thankfully for my husband, he doesn't have so many questions to be answered.  Personally, I'm struggling with how much I should ask our current priest, as I don't want to be seen as a nuisance or as being inappropriate.  (I have some mental baggage that I'm still trying to overcome with regards to how I view priests, also.  That doesn't help matters.)

I know that many answers to common questions can be answered with reading and careful studying, but some things aren't easily answered by reading on a website, a book or even by searching on a messageboard.   Wink  It doesn't help that I cannot shake this desire to know everything about Orthodoxy ASAP, even though I'm far from being an intellectual person or a scholar.

Basically I'm curious -- how much do you share with your priest, or how much "stuff" do you bring to him, like questions or concerns?

Thanks in advance. 
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Thomas
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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2011, 09:41:14 PM »

Ask for a meeting to ask him questions you can not find answers for. Make it casual and comfortable for both of you.

Thomas
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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2011, 09:52:28 PM »

Thanks, and that seems simple enough, however my questions seem...I don't know, juvenile?  Like I should know answers already.  Gosh, even asking this question seems immature and silly, honestly.

Maybe I'd be better suited talking with a therapist rather than a priest!
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HabteSelassie
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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2011, 10:48:50 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Thanks, and that seems simple enough, however my questions seem...I don't know, juvenile?  Like I should know answers already.  Gosh, even asking this question seems immature and silly, honestly.

Maybe I'd be better suited talking with a therapist rather than a priest!

There is no such thing, that is precisely what Priests are for. As we say to just about everything in Orthodox, "Ask your priest."   Nothing is too silly unless he says it is, and even if then, you can always ask another priest Wink

stay blessed,
habte selassie
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"Yet stand aloof from stupid questionings and geneologies and strifes and fightings about law, for they are without benefit and vain." Titus 3:10
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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2011, 10:55:18 PM »

Can't we view a priest as a therapist?

I dunno I always felt the Church is a hospital for sinners and the priests are like the doctors...
« Last Edit: October 19, 2011, 11:12:28 PM by Achronos » Logged

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HabteSelassie
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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2011, 11:04:10 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Can't we view a priest as a therapist?

I dunno I always felt the Church was a hospital for sinners and the priests are like the doctors...

Yes, in fact, we should.  I do Smiley

stay blessed,
habte selassie
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Mariama
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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2011, 07:09:19 AM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

Thanks, and that seems simple enough, however my questions seem...I don't know, juvenile?  Like I should know answers already.  Gosh, even asking this question seems immature and silly, honestly.

Maybe I'd be better suited talking with a therapist rather than a priest!

There is no such thing, that is precisely what Priests are for. As we say to just about everything in Orthodox, "Ask your priest."   Nothing is too silly unless he says it is, and even if then, you can always ask another priest Wink

stay blessed,
habte selassie

Thank you for the kind words and advice.  Even though I'm new to the forum, I have read and enjoyed the wisdom of your posts. 
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TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2011, 01:29:38 PM »

Another stupid question ahead... please be gentle. 

Prior to coming into Orthodoxy, my husband and I were in a (Byzantine Catholic) parish where we felt rather uncomfortable talking to the priest about anything, but now, as newcomers to Orthodoxy, questions arise.  For me, the questions seem to come up almost on an hourly basis, but thankfully for my husband, he doesn't have so many questions to be answered.  Personally, I'm struggling with how much I should ask our current priest, as I don't want to be seen as a nuisance or as being inappropriate.  (I have some mental baggage that I'm still trying to overcome with regards to how I view priests, also.  That doesn't help matters.)

I know that many answers to common questions can be answered with reading and careful studying, but some things aren't easily answered by reading on a website, a book or even by searching on a messageboard.   Wink  It doesn't help that I cannot shake this desire to know everything about Orthodoxy ASAP, even though I'm far from being an intellectual person or a scholar.

Basically I'm curious -- how much do you share with your priest, or how much "stuff" do you bring to him, like questions or concerns?

Thanks in advance. 

If your questions are non-urgent, may I suggest email? That way you're not "bothering" the priest and you will have the written email to refer to in the future.
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podkarpatska
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2011, 04:34:27 PM »

Another stupid question ahead... please be gentle. 

Prior to coming into Orthodoxy, my husband and I were in a (Byzantine Catholic) parish where we felt rather uncomfortable talking to the priest about anything, but now, as newcomers to Orthodoxy, questions arise.  For me, the questions seem to come up almost on an hourly basis, but thankfully for my husband, he doesn't have so many questions to be answered.  Personally, I'm struggling with how much I should ask our current priest, as I don't want to be seen as a nuisance or as being inappropriate.  (I have some mental baggage that I'm still trying to overcome with regards to how I view priests, also.  That doesn't help matters.)

I know that many answers to common questions can be answered with reading and careful studying, but some things aren't easily answered by reading on a website, a book or even by searching on a messageboard.   Wink  It doesn't help that I cannot shake this desire to know everything about Orthodoxy ASAP, even though I'm far from being an intellectual person or a scholar.

Basically I'm curious -- how much do you share with your priest, or how much "stuff" do you bring to him, like questions or concerns?

Thanks in advance. 

If your questions are non-urgent, may I suggest email? That way you're not "bothering" the priest and you will have the written email to refer to in the future.

I prefer the old fashioned way - face to face. Are you all now e-mailing your doctors and psychologists these days?  Why differentiate with your priest? I must be getting old.....
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TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2011, 08:06:14 PM »


I prefer the old fashioned way - face to face. Are you all now e-mailing your doctors and psychologists these days?  Why differentiate with your priest? I must be getting old.....

Of course, face to face is the only way for spiritual, pastoral matters, but if someone new has a minor "why do Orthodox do X" question or is looking for suggestions on something to read, I see absolutely nothing wrong with email.

Yes, you are getting old! I know a good number priests and I've asked them about this issue. For minor questions, email is fine with them. One, they're not getting a phone call when they might be in the middle of something else. Two, priests are often pulled in 20 different directions on Sundays after Liturgy, so often asking the quick question in person doesn't work too well.
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Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2011, 09:19:24 PM »

Yes, I asked my priest many questions during catechism.  Alot of my questions, though, I posted on here!
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