Author Topic: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.  (Read 318 times)

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Offline Rubricnigel

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Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« on: May 07, 2019, 09:39:49 PM »
http://orthochristian.com/120846.html

Which ones are you familiar with?

Offline Justin Kolodziej

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2019, 10:03:28 PM »
Only the eggs on that list.

LAMB, LAMB, AND MORE LAMB, of course.

There is a braided Pascha bread that Greeks and Armenians have that I forget what it's called, but you are not allowed to cut it with a knife because it has 3 braids for the Trinity. Somehow tearing pieces off is perfectly legit though.
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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2019, 10:28:34 PM »
They forgot the whole bone-in beef ribeye roast.   
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Offline SolEX01

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2019, 10:32:52 PM »
Only the eggs on that list.

LAMB, LAMB, AND MORE LAMB, of course.

There is a braided Pascha bread that Greeks and Armenians have that I forget what it's called, but you are not allowed to cut it with a knife because it has 3 braids for the Trinity. Somehow tearing pieces off is perfectly legit though.

In Greek, it's called tsoureki.

Offline Rubricnigel

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2019, 10:39:03 PM »
Only the eggs on that list.

LAMB, LAMB, AND MORE LAMB, of course.

There is a braided Pascha bread that Greeks and Armenians have that I forget what it's called, but you are not allowed to cut it with a knife because it has 3 braids for the Trinity. Somehow tearing pieces off is perfectly legit though.

I like lamb, BUT, i like beef a whole lot more.

I did enjoy lamb during pascha though, it has to be lamb then

Offline hecma925

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2019, 11:01:38 PM »
Only the eggs on that list.

LAMB, LAMB, AND MORE LAMB, of course.

There is a braided Pascha bread that Greeks and Armenians have that I forget what it's called, but you are not allowed to cut it with a knife because it has 3 braids for the Trinity. Somehow tearing pieces off is perfectly legit though.

I like lamb, BUT, i like beef a whole lot more.

I did enjoy lamb during pascha though, it has to be lamb then

It never has to be lamb.
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

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Offline Dominika

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2019, 04:59:22 AM »
It's more applicable for Russian, not counting coloured eggs.

In Poland both for Orthodox and Catholics we have paschal basket called święconka thats blessed on the Great Saturday
and we should break fast with these blessed products, so there are:
1. Bread and wine - Mystical Supper
2. Egg - life
3. Salt - no corruption and that Christ told us to be salt of the Earth
4. Pepper - strenth of the soul
5. Meat (usually kiełbasa, some people add other stuff), cheese (Orthodox usually put there Pascha cake, Catholic in some regions and families and chocolate) - the end of the fast
6. Flowers, willows - life and Palm Sunday
7. Candle (only among Orthodox) - waiting for the Christ's Resurrection and its Light.

And the baskets are covered by white, decorative materials
Edit: we don't put it in basket, but both in Serbia and Poland, as for other the most important feasts (Nativity, st. Basil, Epiphany, Pentecost; sometimes Dormition and st. George; and of course weddings) pork appears on the table.
In Poland it looks like this


In Serbia like this:
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 05:05:29 AM by Dominika »
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My Orthodox liturgical blog "For what eat, while you can fast" in Polish (videos featuring chants in different languages)

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2019, 01:36:39 PM »
Poland < Serbia
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Offline Tzimis

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2019, 07:57:58 PM »
     Magiritsa is traditionally eaten after the midnight Paschal Liturgy. Along with red eggs which are cracked by two people reciting xristos anesti for the points of the eggs and alithos anesti for the rounded part of the eggs. The winner with the uncracked egg is said to have a blessing for the year. This goes on till most of the eggs are cracked.

    In larger families a small goat is oven cooked after midnight to celebrate the breaking of the fast in preparation for a lamb or multiple lambs on the spit that afternoon.  Kokoretsi is also traditional eaten as an appetizer while waiting for the lamb to cook. The lamb usually takes around 5 hours, so people get hungry.

 There is Tsoureki bread also commonly called lampropsomo during easter. I could go on as its a very festive holiday.  That and August 15th AKA Panagias.  Which is the second largest feast next to Easter.  Yes it is greater than Christmas in Greece.  Both are great. Actually all three but, Easter from me brings the greatest joy.

Offline Rubricnigel

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Re: Paschal dishes and their symbolism.
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2019, 05:46:33 PM »
     Magiritsa is traditionally eaten after the midnight Paschal Liturgy. Along with red eggs which are cracked by two people reciting xristos anesti for the points of the eggs and alithos anesti for the rounded part of the eggs. The winner with the uncracked egg is said to have a blessing for the year. This goes on till most of the eggs are cracked.

    In larger families a small goat is oven cooked after midnight to celebrate the breaking of the fast in preparation for a lamb or multiple lambs on the spit that afternoon.  Kokoretsi is also traditional eaten as an appetizer while waiting for the lamb to cook. The lamb usually takes around 5 hours, so people get hungry.

 There is Tsoureki bread also commonly called lampropsomo during easter. I could go on as its a very festive holiday.  That and August 15th AKA Panagias.  Which is the second largest feast next to Easter.  Yes it is greater than Christmas in Greece.  Both are great. Actually all three but, Easter from me brings the greatest joy.

My egg won, im going broke buying lottery tickets....