OrthodoxChristianity.net
April 20, 2014, 12:23:44 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: The Rules page has been updated.  Please familiarize yourself with its contents!
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Feast of the Intercession (Pokrov) honored in Russia  (Read 2612 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
biro
Excelsior
Site Supporter
Toumarches
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Church
Posts: 11,912


Και κλήρονομον δείξον με, ζωής της αιωνίου

fleem
WWW
« on: October 14, 2011, 06:50:18 PM »

The Russian Orthodox Church has celebrated the Feast of the Intercession, or Pokrov. It commemorates the day in the 10th Century when the Theotokos protected the city of Constantinople from invasion.

From the article:
Quote
Legend has it that the Mother of God covered the residents with her veil as if with a shield.

For this very reason, the Icon of the Holy Protection depicts the Mother of God with the Protecting Veil in her hands.
Logged

Charlie Rose: If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be?

Fran Lebowitz: Everything. There is not one thing with which I am satisfied.

http://spcasuncoast.org/
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 07:53:26 PM »

For us of Slavic origin, the Pokrov is a major Marian feast-day. It is my understanding that this in not the case in the Greek or Arabic traditions. Does anyone know why this is so since the Virgin's intercession occurred in Byzantine Constantinople? Thanks!
Logged
Deacon Lance
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Catholic
Jurisdiction: Archeparchy of Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,730


Liturgy at Mt. St. Macrina Pilgrimage


« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 08:33:17 PM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.
Logged

My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 11:22:52 PM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.

That's what I had always heard, but it seems as if deleting such a feast would appear as an affront to the Theotokos in a 'what have you done for us lately' mindset. My priest and I were discussing this today after Liturgy we brought up the same thought. I wonder if there is a better explanation.
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,047


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2011, 01:03:30 AM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.

That's what I had always heard, but it seems as if deleting such a feast would appear as an affront to the Theotokos in a 'what have you done for us lately' mindset. My priest and I were discussing this today after Liturgy we brought up the same thought. I wonder if there is a better explanation.

I don't think you understand what kind of impact the fall of Const had on the piety of the local church there. Tuesdays are considered bad luck b/c the city fell on a Tuesday.  That's a small example. There are many more

Imagine Moscow disappearing. Or Kiev
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2011, 07:41:44 AM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.

That's what I had always heard, but it seems as if deleting such a feast would appear as an affront to the Theotokos in a 'what have you done for us lately' mindset. My priest and I were discussing this today after Liturgy we brought up the same thought. I wonder if there is a better explanation.

I don't think you understand what kind of impact the fall of Const had on the piety of the local church there. Tuesdays are considered bad luck b/c the city fell on a Tuesday.  That's a small example. There are many more

Imagine Moscow disappearing. Or Kiev

Still, are we not obligated to keep the faith notwithstanding what we must endure on this earth?

I suspect that the faithful of Russia, and I am no fan of things Russian, would point out the endurance of the faith in the face of Soviet brutality. The destruction of Christ the Saviour Cathedral and tens of thousands of other churches and the murders of thousands of clergy and bishops as well as the subornation of the 'official' Church. Our Ukrainian brothers would share similar tales, including that of the Holodomyr....All of our earthly cultures have their own inherent fault lines, when if triggered, lead to death and suffering. The Church is there to serve in part as a bulwark and strength for us. I think Slavs as a group have a hard time understanding this particular issue, but I do recognize the historical framework. Perhaps it is time, after over five centuries, for this great feast to be restored to its place of honor in the Hellenic world?

Please believe me that I ask in a sense of curiosity, not judgment and that my intent is charitable. Thanks! I know it is a sensitive issue, particularly after the horrors of the post World War one 'relocations.'
« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 07:43:31 AM by podkarpatska » Logged
LizaSymonenko
Слава Ісусу Христу!!! Glory to Jesus Christ!!!
Global Moderator
Toumarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: God's Holy Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A.
Posts: 11,359



WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2011, 07:57:50 AM »


My Ukrainian Orthodox church is named after the Pokrov.  It's a HUGE Feast Day in Ukraine.

We celebrated our Parish Feast Day last Sunday.

It was a huge celebration, deep in meaning, and symbolism. 

She still stands, weeps and prays for us all.
Logged

Conquer evil men by your gentle kindness, and make zealous men wonder at your goodness. Put the lover of legality to shame by your compassion. With the afflicted be afflicted in mind. Love all men, but keep distant from all men.
—St. Isaac of Syria
Michał Kalina
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,465


WWW
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2011, 08:16:40 AM »

The funny things is that Constantinople was being attacked by Slavs then.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,047


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2011, 02:37:20 PM »

Perhaps it is time, after over five centuries, for this great feast to be restored to its place of honor in the Hellenic world?

Please believe me that I ask in a sense of curiosity, not judgment and that my intent is charitable. Thanks! I know it is a sensitive issue, particularly after the horrors of the post World War one 'relocations.'

Oh my friend I wish you knew how much I am LOL'ing right now.  The Greeks, and especially those from Asia Minor, will never give up on the hope that Constantinople will once again be a christian city.  There's even a prophesy of how it will all go down. 

In order to restore the feast day I think we have to focus on the spiritual element of being protected. But even that will be tempered by the great sense of loss these people have.  After 500 years of them thinking one way, I don't understand why it would not take 500 years to change it. 

Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Iconodule
Uranopolitan
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA (Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania)
Posts: 6,834


"My god is greater."


« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2011, 02:39:26 PM »

The nearest Greek monastery to me is named after the intercession. Not sure if that says anything about the wider importance of the feast.
Logged

"A riddle or the cricket's cry
Is to doubt a fit reply." - William Blake

Quote from: Byron
Just ignore iconotools delusions. He is the biggest multiculturalist globalist there is due to his unfortunate background.
Ansgar
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: More than an inquirer, less than a catechumen
Jurisdiction: Exarchate of orthodox churches of russian tradition in western Europe
Posts: 2,794


Keep your mind in hell and do not despair


« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2011, 02:55:37 PM »

Our church is named after this feast too  Smiley
Logged

Do not be cast down over the struggle - the Lord loves a brave warrior. The Lord loves the soul that is valiant.

-St Silouan the athonite
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2011, 03:11:42 PM »

Perhaps it is time, after over five centuries, for this great feast to be restored to its place of honor in the Hellenic world?

Please believe me that I ask in a sense of curiosity, not judgment and that my intent is charitable. Thanks! I know it is a sensitive issue, particularly after the horrors of the post World War one 'relocations.'

Oh my friend I wish you knew how much I am LOL'ing right now.  The Greeks, and especially those from Asia Minor, will never give up on the hope that Constantinople will once again be a christian city.  There's even a prophesy of how it will all go down. 

In order to restore the feast day I think we have to focus on the spiritual element of being protected. But even that will be tempered by the great sense of loss these people have.  After 500 years of them thinking one way, I don't understand why it would not take 500 years to change it. 



I understand that and don't disagree. After all the Jews would toast each passover following the Roman conquest with the prayer/toast -Next year in Jerusalem.

Still, I am confused about downgrading the holy day as not being viewed as anything other than a disrespect of the initial observation and miracle..  and why we Slavs hold Pokrov in such high esteem.
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,047


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2011, 04:35:19 PM »

Perhaps it is time, after over five centuries, for this great feast to be restored to its place of honor in the Hellenic world?

Please believe me that I ask in a sense of curiosity, not judgment and that my intent is charitable. Thanks! I know it is a sensitive issue, particularly after the horrors of the post World War one 'relocations.'

Oh my friend I wish you knew how much I am LOL'ing right now.  The Greeks, and especially those from Asia Minor, will never give up on the hope that Constantinople will once again be a christian city.  There's even a prophesy of how it will all go down. 

In order to restore the feast day I think we have to focus on the spiritual element of being protected. But even that will be tempered by the great sense of loss these people have.  After 500 years of them thinking one way, I don't understand why it would not take 500 years to change it. 



I understand that and don't disagree. After all the Jews would toast each passover following the Roman conquest with the prayer/toast -Next year in Jerusalem.

Still, I am confused about downgrading the holy day as not being viewed as anything other than a disrespect of the initial observation and miracle..  and why we Slavs hold Pokrov in such high esteem.

the piety changed.  piety has changed throughout the centuries.  I mean as a simple example, how long did the Agape meal last as the form of the liturgy?  less than 100 years?  and that was the faith of the apostles! 

How many times did the Panagia save the city?  how many feast days do we have dedicated to it!  To lose the city, in the way that it happened, I think was just too much for the people of that time.  Now we have to deal with the spiritual repercussions. 
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,520



« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2011, 09:18:30 PM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.

That's what I had always heard, but it seems as if deleting such a feast would appear as an affront to the Theotokos in a 'what have you done for us lately' mindset. My priest and I were discussing this today after Liturgy we brought up the same thought. I wonder if there is a better explanation.

I don't think you understand what kind of impact the fall of Const had on the piety of the local church there. Tuesdays are considered bad luck b/c the city fell on a Tuesday.  That's a small example. There are many more

Imagine Moscow disappearing. Or Kiev
Regarding "Tuesday" as being "bad luck" I'm not sure it has much to do with the fall of C-ple. I think it's a Balkan thing. I mean we had this superstition too, it even entered the language itself as "marti seara" ("Tuesday evening"), a mythical old woman punishing women doing certain types of work that day etc.
Logged
IreneOlinyk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox (EP)
Posts: 203


« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2011, 01:37:47 PM »

They ceased celebrating it as a major feast after the fall of Constantinople.

That's what I had always heard, but it seems as if deleting such a feast would appear as an affront to the Theotokos in a 'what have you done for us lately' mindset. My priest and I were discussing this today after Liturgy we brought up the same thought. I wonder if there is a better explanation.

I don't think you understand what kind of impact the fall of Const had on the piety of the local church there. Tuesdays are considered bad luck b/c the city fell on a Tuesday.  That's a small example. There are many more

Imagine Moscow disappearing. Or Kiev

Good examples Serb.  Just to follow your line of thought: Kyiv was sacked by the Tartars in 1240.  The bueatiful fresco of the Theotokos in St. Sophia was left undamaged.  That is why it is called "The Unmoveable Wall" and increased the devotion of Ukrainians to the Theotokos.
Logged
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2011, 09:58:25 PM »

I am still not swayed by the cultural arguments and the 'bad luck' superstitions.....It seems to me that the anger and hurt over the collapse of the Byzantine Empire resulted in the 'downgrading' of the feast. Is there another explanation? Is that like a societal cry made 'en masse' by a culture in anger against God  just as an angry parent might make upon the needless death of a child in an accident?

How do we pastorally address the faith and despair issues of those parents should they bring up the larger example of the Hellenic reaction to Pokrov?
Logged
Gorazd
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Istanbul and Chambésy
Posts: 1,854



« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2011, 11:13:35 PM »

Is that like a societal cry made 'en masse' by a culture in anger against God  just as an angry parent might make upon the needless death of a child in an accident?

I don't see anger against God... simply that protection had ended, so, as something of the past, it was not celebrated as much anymore as something present.

And seriously, I never understood why this feast is so important for Ukrainians, Rusyns etc. If it was about the protection of Kyiv, I would, but Constantinople?


The Greeks, and especially those from Asia Minor, will never give up on the hope that Constantinople will once again be a christian city. 
Hope is a great thing. But a missionary effort amongst Turks would be good, too.
Logged
Michał Kalina
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,465


WWW
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2011, 05:13:52 AM »

I don't see anger against God... simply that protection had ended.

http://www.holycross-hermitage.com/pages/Orthodox_Life/theotokos_prayers.htm

Really? No, I don't think so.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2011, 09:06:13 AM »

I don't see anger against God... simply that protection had ended.

http://www.holycross-hermitage.com/pages/Orthodox_Life/theotokos_prayers.htm

Really? No, I don't think so.

I guess will are going to have to chalk this up to a difference in emphasis with respect to the devotion to the Theotokas between the Slavs and the Hellenes.

I think that it is difficult for those coming into Orthodoxy to 'understand' (that is the wrong word, because I don't think understanding in an 'intellectual' sense is at the root of this....) that in spite of the doctrinal unity among the disparate Orthodox Churches around the world these regional distinctions do matter and do trouble many of us as they lay at the very core of our spiritual understanding/ The power in the words of the prayers that Michal cites are exemplatives of such.

Thoughts and feelings like I brought up here can become a stumbling block to mutual understanding and remain a source of division within our communities. More importantly, to some (thankfully not all), they become so transcendent that they are transformed into a barrier between the individual and God. It is so, so hard to get beyond such things and recognize the unifying power of the Holy Spirit among us all.

The difficulties in 'organizing' the Orthodox in the Americas comes to mind. It has been likened to a task similar to that of 'herding cats' in many ways. It goes beyond the 'cultural club' mindset (albeit that is a large part of it) and ends up in an inner place far more powerful and difficult to penetrate. It is deeper and more impenetrable than a simplistic 'Slav v. Hellene' equation.

For example, many of us who are non-Russian Slavs have a deep routed 'resentment' of some, if not many aspects of the Russian Church. YET...in spite of that...our commonality will almost always draw us to her akin to moths being attracted by light. It's difficult to explain, I (and many Rusyns and most Ukrainians) have been brought up with an 'anti-Russophile' point of view, yet....Most Slavs share aspects of the Russian chant, Russian choral singing, with common liturgical practices, devotionals, pilgrimages, village celebrations, holyday and holiday customs..etc...Even among the Greek Catholics of east Europe this holds true in spite of all that has transpired over the centuries.

I have had the privilege of attending hierarchical services presided by Patriarchs, including those of the Ecumenical Patriarch. Yet I would be untruthful if I said my soul were touched equally by all. I suspect that my Greek brothers would admit to the same, yet in a different direction.

Perhaps this is a challenge that we Orthodox are charged to face, a hurdle, if you will, that we must work on and overcome. Perhaps it is through the infusion of peoples not traditionally Orthodox that the bridges needed to move forward can be built in more lasting and stronger manner.

Just being introspective on a frosty morning..

Logged
Gorazd
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Istanbul and Chambésy
Posts: 1,854



« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2011, 10:05:11 AM »

I don't see anger against God... simply that protection had ended.

http://www.holycross-hermitage.com/pages/Orthodox_Life/theotokos_prayers.htm

Really? No, I don't think so.

The festival is about the Theotokos protecting Constantinople from foreign invasion. And she didn't do that in 1453.
Logged
Michał Kalina
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,465


WWW
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2011, 10:22:01 AM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything, as even St. Andrew and St. Epiphanius noticed: "Do you see, brother, the Holy Theotokos, praying for all the world?". And she still does. There still is a Patriarch in Constantinople, isn't it?

http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsViewer.asp?FSID=102824
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2011, 10:30:14 AM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything, as even St. Andrew and St. Epiphanius noticed: "Do you see, brother, the Holy Theotokos, praying for all the world?". And she still does. There still is a Patriarch in Constantinople, isn't it?

http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsViewer.asp?FSID=102824

^^The two most recent exchanges, both from serious and sincere believers, underscores my thoughts.

BTW, I am not suggesting that one group of Orthodox 'favors' the Theotokos more than does another. This is all about nuance, and nuance (i.e. the 'grey' areas) are what we argue on and on about in the world of Faith.
Logged
AWR
Greetings from the Southern Jersey Shore.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 240


Expelled from Paradise


WWW
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2011, 10:42:21 AM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything, as even St. Andrew and St. Epiphanius noticed: "Do you see, brother, the Holy Theotokos, praying for all the world?". And she still does. There still is a Patriarch in Constantinople, isn't it?

http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsViewer.asp?FSID=102824

^^The two most recent exchanges, both from serious and sincere believers, underscores my thoughts.

BTW, I am not suggesting that one group of Orthodox 'favors' the Theotokos more than does another. This is all about nuance, and nuance (i.e. the 'grey' areas) are what we argue on and on about in the world of Faith.

Our parish celebrates this feast on October 1st.  And we have a large Icon of it on the wall of our church.  

I think the reason why it is big in the Russian tradition, is because the Fool-for-Christ, St Andrew was of Slavic decent.

 I think that the feast was moved to October 28 in the Greek tradition.


Another description of the feast is at:
http://www.holy-transfiguration.org/library_en/moth_protection.html


« Last Edit: October 17, 2011, 10:43:21 AM by AWR » Logged
Gorazd
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Istanbul and Chambésy
Posts: 1,854



« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2011, 11:50:36 AM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything
If Eastern Slavs define it that way, it would explain why they are so attached to this feast.

But in the Greek tradition, it seems to be defined more specifically, and thus it has lost its importance since 1453.
Logged
Michał Kalina
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,465


WWW
« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2011, 12:00:12 PM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything
If Eastern Slavs define it that way, it would explain why they are so attached to this feast.

Were St. Andrew and St. Epihanius who said that in Constantinople Eastern Slavs?
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
AWR
Greetings from the Southern Jersey Shore.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 240


Expelled from Paradise


WWW
« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2011, 12:03:02 PM »

You are wrong. The feast is about Theotokos protecting everything
If Eastern Slavs define it that way, it would explain why they are so attached to this feast.

Were St. Andrew and St. Epihanius who said that in Constantinople Eastern Slavs?

St. Andrew was a Slav by birth and as a child was sold into slavery.
Logged
Michał Kalina
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,465


WWW
« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2011, 12:10:35 PM »

So the fact that he was brought up by Greeks means that he belonged to the Greek tradition.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
podkarpatska
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ACROD
Posts: 7,571


SS Cyril and Methodius Church, Mercer, PA


WWW
« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2011, 01:10:32 PM »

Those who are answering to justify the 'downplaying' of the Feast, if that is the case, in the Hellenic tradition are just reinforcing the feeling which Slavs regarding this issue. I would really like to hear the Church's POV rather than that of folk tradition. I am relating folk tradition from the Slavic side, and frankly, many of the Marian prayers and intercessory petitions we so love do come to us from the (shudder everybody now...) West to a limited extent. (Not all 'West = Bad ')....

No one has addressed my musings about how the Slavs and Greeks 'perceive' themselves and in doing so each other's Orthodoxy. Any takers?

Also, the use of the term 'Slavs' as applied to Slavs in Constaninople at the time of the fall would relate to peoples on the 'fault' line between the Hellenic and the 'barbarian' worlds, i.e. modern Slavic Macedonia? By the 11th and 12th centuries, the northern and eastern Slavs (the varied 'tribes' of 'Rus') had firmly established their devotion to the Feast.

This is probably much ado about nothing, just interesting from a historical/cultural perspective.
Logged
Orest
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 870


« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2011, 02:09:57 PM »

By the 11th and 12th centuries, the northern and eastern Slavs (the varied 'tribes' of 'Rus') had firmly established their devotion to the Feast.


This article mentions the Ukrainian tradition as a part of the article:
Quote
The cult of the Mother of God as the Intercessor and Patron got firmly established among the Ukrainians: Ukrainian princes, kings, Cossacks, and hetmans chose the Mother of God as their Patron and Guardian.

Prince Yaroslav the Wise in 1036 defeated the Pechenegs and built in Kyiv the Cathedral of the Holy Sophia and the Church of Assumption at the Golden Gates out of gratitude. In 1037, in the Church of Assumption, he entrusted the whole nation to the guardianship of the Mother of God. Prince Mstyslav during his campaign against Circassians promised to build a church in honour of the Mother of God if She helps him to defeat the enemy. He defeated them and fulfilled his promise. Prince Volodymyr Monomakh in his memoirs wrote that he defeated the Polovtsi thanks to God and the Most Holy Virgin.  In 1103 before the campaign against the Polovtsi, our princes and dukes made vows to God and the Holy Virgin Mary. Prince Ihor Sviatoslavovych after his escape from captivity, came to bow to a wonder-working icon of the Mother of God to thank her for the help. The Galician King Danylo after his successful campaign to the Czech land hurried to the icon of the Mother of God in Kholm to thank Her, bow down and bring rich gifts. Some Ukrainian princes’  seals contained small icons of the Mother of God or prayers to her on their.

Zaporozhian Cossacks built in their Sich host a Church in honour of the Protection of the Holy Mother of God which contained an icon of her veil. There was an inscription on the icon “I will cover my people” and another inscription on a ribbon under the icon “We pray: cover us with Your Holy Veil and deliver us from evil.” Before their military campaigns, the Cossacks held public prayers to their patroness. Upon their successful return, they thanked the patroness.

http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/culture/religious_holidays/44849/
Logged
Tags: Russia  Russian Orthodox Church  Pokrov  Intercession 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.117 seconds with 55 queries.