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Author Topic: Patriarch Alexy II sends Christmas greetings to Pope John Paul II  (Read 1544 times) Average Rating: 0
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Tony
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« on: December 22, 2002, 10:52:38 PM »

22.12.2002 18:06:02
Russian Orthodox leader invites pope to resume contact
MOSCOW. Dec 22 (Interfax) - The head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Alexy II, has sent Christmas greetings to Pope John Paul II, inviting the Roman Catholic leader to "resume our brotherly contacts."

   "With a sense of brotherly love in Christ, we send you cordial greetings on occasion of the joyful and world-saving holiday of the advent of the Lord and our Savior into the world," Alexy said in a message made available to Interfax.

   "Illuminated by the gracious rays of the light of Christ:let us resume our brotherly contacts and send joyful praise to the newborn Divine Child, who has come to earth for our sake:"

   Alexy promised that he would make special prayers at Christmas for God to grant the pope "a life of peace and numerous gifts during the entire New Saving Year."

   Alexy also sent Christmas messages to the heads of Orthodox churches that follow the Gregorian calendar unlike the Russian, Jerusalem, Serbian, and Georgian churches and monasteries on Mt. Athos, Greece, which stick to Julian calendar, which is 13 days behind the Gregorian calendar.

   The Orthodox churches of Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, Poland, Syria, Lebanon, and Egypt have been following the Gregorian calendar since the 1920s after the Constantonople Patriarchate.

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Daniel
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2003, 04:08:40 PM »

Yeah, I guess the Russian Orthodox Patriarch would like to resume contacts to the Pope, even though he, and the Russian State, continue their persecution of Catholics in Russia.  The charitable papal organization, Aid to the Church in Need, has given over $16 million to the Russian Orthodox Church to help it rebuild, since the fall of communism.  But now it is reevaluating these dispersments, based on the continued persecutions.  As the lady told me when I called to complain about such dispersements, "we can only offer our other cheek so many times, before we give up and walk away.."  

 Lest anyone think that the establishment of four dioceses in Russia by the Catholic Church (for the Roman Catholics) was the lynchpin to this persecution, then why were 23 Christian ministers, including Roman Catholic priests, expelled even before the raising of the four Catholic apostolic administrative areas to full diocese status?    Cry

Daniel Joseph Barton
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2003, 04:08:54 PM »

Yeah, I guess the Russian Orthodox Patriarch would like to resume contacts to the Pope, even though he, and the Russian State, continue their persecution of Catholics in Russia.  The charitable papal organization, Aid to the Church in Need, has given over $16 million to the Russian Orthodox Church to help it rebuild, since the fall of communism.  But now it is reevaluating these dispersments, based on the continued persecutions.  As the lady told me when I called to complain about such dispersements, "we can only offer our other cheek so many times, before we give up and walk away.."  

 Lest anyone think that the establishment of four dioceses in Russia by the Catholic Church (for the Roman Catholics) was the lynchpin to this persecution, then why were 23 Christian ministers, including Roman Catholic priests, expelled even before the raising of the four Catholic apostolic administrative areas to full diocese status?    Cry

Daniel Joseph Barton
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(daniel.j.barton@us.army.mil)
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Orthodoc
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2003, 06:36:22 PM »

[As the lady told me when I called to complain about such dispersements, "we can only offer our other cheek so many times, before we give up and walk away.." ]

Promises, promises, promises!  Not only the Russian, but all Orthodox Catholics churches have been turning the 'other cheek' for a thousand years.  

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The young fogey
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2003, 11:07:28 AM »

Quote
Yeah, I guess the Russian Orthodox Patriarch would like to resume contacts to the Pope, even though he, and the Russian State, continue their persecution of Catholics in Russia.  ...Lest anyone think that the establishment of four dioceses in Russia by the Catholic Church (for the Roman Catholics) was the lynchpin to this persecution, then why were 23 Christian ministers, including Roman Catholic priests, expelled even before the raising of the four Catholic apostolic administrative areas to full diocese status?

That Russia would defend the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) against foreign intruders, whoever they may be, is no surprise. In a way I'd expect nothing less. Historically it fits right in: Alexander Nevsky vs. the Teutonic Knights, Boris Godunov vs. False Dimitry and the Poles...

It’s fair to ask what exactly you want: a state Church, only yours (Catholic), not theirs? Or modern secular religious pluralism? When Catholics use the latter argument it only makes them sound like just another liberal Protestant denomination.

In a country such as the US where no Orthodox or Catholic church has put down roots as a state church, religious freedom makes sense because it's a relative good that lets the church flourish.

But Russia isn't America. (Duh.)

Aid to the Church in Need does wonderful work AFAIK in Russia, building up, not tearing down, the ROC. Would that some of your confreres, such as Gerard and the retired RC archbishop of Anchorage, did likewise.

IMO the proper Catholic stance in Russia is this: a passive position ministering to its ethnic German and Polish flock, accepting conversions of Russians (most of whom are hitherto unchurched, not Orthodox) but not soliciting them, NOT competing with the ROC, with the goal of corporate reunion in the long run (per Balamand). AFAIK this is the gentlemanly official position of Archbishop Tadeusz Kondrusiewicz in Moscow.
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