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Luke90
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« on: September 30, 2011, 02:49:00 PM »

Just a quick question, what version of the bible is the accepted version by the Orthodox church?, and, where would be the best place to get one?
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JLatimer
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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2011, 03:07:42 PM »

If you mean which Bible translation is officially endorsed, the answer is none.
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2011, 03:17:28 PM »

in that case, which is the preferred version used by most Orthodox Christians?
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NicholasMyra
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2011, 03:36:15 PM »

in that case, which is the preferred version used by most Orthodox Christians?
As for English translations, I've seen:

KJV
NKJV
RSV
Douay-Rheims
Eastern Orthodox Bible (work in progress)

And I personally also like NASB sometimes.

NIV is looked down upon because of its anti-traditional bias.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2011, 03:42:21 PM by NicholasMyra » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2011, 03:40:39 PM »

You may find this helpful:

http://ancientfaith.com/podcasts/hopko/how_to_read_the_bible
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1 Samuel 25:22 (KJV)
So and more also do God unto the enemies of David, if I leave of all that pertain to him by the morning light any that pisseth against the wall.
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2011, 03:50:43 PM »

at the moment, I own a "good news bible"  and a Catholic bible. there's some difference in the two when reading them side by side.

I think I read somewhere the Orthodox Study bible is a good place to start? because it has explanation notes and more books?  Huh
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« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2011, 03:53:30 PM »

I think I read somewhere the Orthodox Study bible is a good place to start? because it has explanation notes and more books?  Huh
If you can find one on discount, sure. It's a rough/rushed translation with very basic notes.

If you just want the full Deuterocanon/Anagignoskomena (the books the Protestant bibles don't have) you might be able to locate a slim RSV volume of them at your local used bookstore.
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2011, 03:56:35 PM »

at the moment, I own a "good news bible"  and a Catholic bible. there's some difference in the two when reading them side by side.

I think I read somewhere the Orthodox Study bible is a good place to start? because it has explanation notes and more books?  Huh

The Catholic Bible is way better than the Good News Bible. Not a big fan of the Orthodox Study Bible, but I have one. It probably wouldn't hurt to get one. Personally I think having a variety of translations to compare is nice. And if you have time, you could even learn a bit of Greek.
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1 Samuel 25:22 (KJV)
So and more also do God unto the enemies of David, if I leave of all that pertain to him by the morning light any that pisseth against the wall.
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2011, 04:15:43 PM »

at the moment, I own a "good news bible"  and a Catholic bible. there's some difference in the two when reading them side by side.

I think I read somewhere the Orthodox Study bible is a good place to start? because it has explanation notes and more books?  Huh
There are different Catholic Bibles, but the one you have is likely better than the Good News Bible - which is fine if you're reading just to get a quick overview - or to read parts (especially Old Testament) as stories. That's why it was produced, and it does serve its purpose. However, you want a more solid translation for regular study and use.

If you're attending an Orthodox parish, you may want to consider the version used there in most settings - as long as you don't find it particularly antiquated for your tastes.

Unlike many others, I do like the OSB. The language is as formal as ordinary contemporary English is likely to be. The notes make a good starting place for further study. Some of the articles give a good overview of a variety of topics. Some criticize the notes, thinking that they should be more exhaustive. However, that's not the purpose of an edition like this. You're getting the "Readers Digest" version that can whet your appetite for further study.
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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2011, 04:20:24 PM »

The language is as formal as ordinary contemporary English is likely to be.
That's because the New Testament and Psalms are NKJV.  Wink
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« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2011, 05:02:45 PM »

For the old testament-  I thought it was prefered to have a translation based off of the anceint greek texts (septiguant) LXX. 

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« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2011, 05:21:22 PM »

NOAB RSV w/ Extended Apocrypha
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« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2011, 06:00:34 PM »

For the old testament-  I thought it was prefered to have a translation based off of the anceint greek texts (septiguant) LXX. 



It is, at least in the opinion of the majority, from what I can tell. But BTW, this doesn't mean study of the Hebrew is not also useful.
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1 Samuel 25:22 (KJV)
So and more also do God unto the enemies of David, if I leave of all that pertain to him by the morning light any that pisseth against the wall.
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« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2011, 06:14:41 PM »

The RSV is the "accepted" translation of the Armenian Church in the English-speaking world. It is the only version allowed to be read at the Liturgy, when the readings are in English.

Btw, I personally have not found a more reliable English Bible than the Oxford Study Bible with Apocrypha. It really is worth the investment.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2011, 06:15:33 PM by Gisasargavak » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2011, 06:55:04 PM »

The language is as formal as ordinary contemporary English is likely to be.
That's because the New Testament and Psalms are NKJV.  Wink
Almost. New Testament, yes, but not the Psalms (although it was that way in the earlier NT + Psalms volume) especially Psalm 151  Smiley. And yes, where the translation from the Septuagint matches the NKJV, the translators used that wording, which became the pattern or style of English used throughout.

One advantage to the use of the NKJV by the OSB is that when talking with Protestants, especially Evangelicals, it disarms them to find out that we (meaning at least some of us) are happy with one of "their" translations.
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« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2011, 09:12:14 PM »

The RSV is the "accepted" translation of the Armenian Church in the English-speaking world. It is the only version allowed to be read at the Liturgy, when the readings are in English.

Btw, I personally have not found a more reliable English Bible than the Oxford Study Bible with Apocrypha. It really is worth the investment.

I have the Oxford in the NRSV. Is that what you're refering to? Or do you have the older (and better IMO Oxford Study Bible RSV)?
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1 Samuel 25:22 (KJV)
So and more also do God unto the enemies of David, if I leave of all that pertain to him by the morning light any that pisseth against the wall.
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« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2011, 09:25:47 PM »

I think I read somewhere the Orthodox Study bible is a good place to start? because it has explanation notes and more books?  Huh

It's exactly that.  

I have the Oxford in the NRSV. Is that what you're refering to? Or do you have the older (and better IMO Oxford Study Bible RSV)?

I think he's referring to The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the apocrypha [their title] for the Revised Standard Version.  http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-Apocrypha-Standard-Expanded-Hardcover/dp/0195283481/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1317431854&sr=8-2

I second the recommendation though, although it doesn't have all of the articles, indications of service readings, and tidbits specific to Orthodoxy.  

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« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2011, 11:43:03 PM »

I love my OSB. I don't mind that the notes aren't too indepth. I didn't think it was supposed to give you a full dissertation of each passage. Just gives a brief explanation as you're reading. If you want to know more, read a specific book on the topic, or use google!!
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« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2011, 01:05:44 AM »

Just a quick question, what version of the bible is the accepted version by the Orthodox church?, and, where would be the best place to get one?

Are you speaking English language here, or world wide?  Cause there's variation in both, but much more variation if you're talking about the Church as a whole.
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« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2011, 01:13:26 PM »

I love my OSB. I don't mind that the notes aren't too indepth. I didn't think it was supposed to give you a full dissertation of each passage. Just gives a brief explanation as you're reading. If you want to know more, read a specific book on the topic, or use google!!

The problems with the notes are that, 1. They are unsourced- when it does tell you which Father they're citing, they don't tell you which work the citation is from, so anyone wishing to look further is out of luck; 2. They frequently give extremely obvious and superfluous explanations to easy passages while passing over many difficult parts in silence; 3. Sometimes they rely on inane gimmicks like the boogeyman of "the West".

All of these problems could be fixed without making the OSB any less user-friendly or accessible. As it is, the OSB as a study bible is sloppy and rushed.
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« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2011, 01:21:49 PM »

NOAB RSV w/ Extended Apocrypha

Yes, this is my preference as well. 
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« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2011, 01:42:01 PM »

From looking a little at the Eastern Orthodox Bible, I'm saying it's pretty well done.

Not very poetic or elegant in translation, but well done.
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« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2011, 06:46:00 PM »

I respect the KJV for its antiquity; When struggling with the verbage, I will look at more recent versions.
To be honest, I have not read a hard copy Bible in years. I have become accustomed to reading the Bible online, and love the website www.bible.com. It allows for very easy word searches as well as quick passage referencing. I highly recommend it.
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« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2011, 01:26:52 PM »

NOAB RSV w/ Extended Apocrypha

Yes, this is my preference as well. 

Does this version use the septuagint for the old testament??  Im thinking about picking one up.

Im wanting to find a bible that is a little more practical for daily reading/carrying around than my OSB.  The OSB is huge (because of all the notes) and it was also 70$ or something.  Id hate for something to happen to it! Ha. 

I want a very accurate translation, with the apocrypha/septuagint.  If it has the apocrypha, does that mean its the septuagint used?

I figured id resurrect this thread before starting another of my own...
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« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2011, 01:38:33 PM »

The OASB-RSV - with "Apocrypha" does NOT use the LXX for the OT. However, its big plus is that it has ALL the books considered part of the "Apocrypha" - even things like 4 Maccabees that aren't in the OSB. There are headers that indicate which books might in the Greek Orthodox Bible and others that are only in the Slavonic Bible, for example.

ETA: The Masoretic is used for the majority of the OT books, but for those that only exist in the LXX, those are translated from the LXX text (since the Hebrew text doesn't exist for some of these books).

However, small it is NOT! The OASB-RSV is bigger than the OSB.

I'm lucky - about five years ago there were TEXT-only (none of the OASB-RSV study notes!) editions of the RSV w/ Apocrypha on clearance from the 50th anniversary of the RSV in 2002. I got a really nice leather covered version that's thinner than the OSB for about $30. If you can get your hands on any of the text-only RSV, I'd recommend it. The study notes in the OASB-RSV just make me nuts. I love the text-only version. If I could have only ONE Bible, this would be it!

There are a few of the HARDCOVER version available used on Amazon. Strongly suggest you look into it. Ones in good condition are under $10 (+ shipping).

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195288084/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=


Fr. Hopko has said that he recommends this RSV w/Apocrypha, and if you follow the textual notes (that say alternative readings from other ancient manuscripts and such), that almost all the time you will have the Orthodox reading.
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« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2011, 02:26:56 PM »

i am a big, big fan of the orthodox study Bible.
 Smiley
the old testament is from the septuagint (more accurate than the masoretic text and the version quoted by all the first churches) and, for me, the size is perfect.
it is small enough to fit into my bag and to take to church, Bible study, on long train journeys, on holiday etc. etc. but big enough to have basic information on all the basic orthodox topics. it really explains orthodoxy well to those from other Christian traditions and it uses minimal jargon, so it is very accessible for people who do not have any previous experience of Christianity.

if you want a PhD in theology, sure, you will need to read more study materials.
when i have finished reading the OSB, i may also move on. but i think it's good to understand something at this medium sized level before reading (for example) all the homilies of saint john chrysostom or the ins and outs of tertullan and whether or not he should have been excommunicated.
so, maybe in 40 years or so, i'll catch up with all you scholars.
until then, where i go, my orthodox study Bible comes with me!
 Cool
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