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Author Topic: Non-Orthodox baptism  (Read 836 times) Average Rating: 0
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Paisius
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« on: September 15, 2011, 09:51:55 PM »

I have an interesting question. Would it be possible for a mother who is not Orthodox to have their infant baptized Orthodox if they have an Orthodox godparent?
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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2011, 09:52:56 PM »

You could find a priest to do it, if that's what you mean. Is it proper? Probably not, if the kid isn't going to be raised Orthodox.
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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2011, 10:23:31 PM »

What's the point in baptizing a kid in the Orthodox Church, if he won't be raised Orthodox? Especially if neither parent is Orthodox.
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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2011, 10:48:56 PM »

What's the point in baptizing a kid in the Orthodox Church, if he won't be raised Orthodox? Especially if neither parent is Orthodox.

Perhaps some parents like to hedge their bets when it comes to God...
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« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2011, 11:18:33 PM »

Would it be possible for a mother who is not Orthodox to have their infant baptized Orthodox if they have an Orthodox godparent?

If you've got the money, many priests have the time.
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Paisius
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« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2011, 11:25:18 PM »

I suppose my question should have been is it appropriate/proper, not just possible.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2011, 11:25:47 PM by Paisius » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2011, 12:20:56 AM »

What if a child is born while parents are catechumens?  Just a curious thought that this thread raised...
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« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2011, 01:38:01 AM »

What if a child is born while parents are catechumens?  Just a curious thought that this thread raised...

I would assume, barring an emergency medical situation, that the household would be baptized together in the ancient custom.
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« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2011, 03:12:08 AM »

It may seem strange because of the question as to why a non-Orthodox parent would desire to have their infant baptised in the Orthodox Church, but it is my understanding that the parents canonical standing with the church (or lack of standing as in the question in this topic) is not an issue with regard to an infant candidate's proposed Baptism, Chrismation, and first Holy Communion.  The Godparent would be responsible to have the child raised in the church.  On what grounds would the church reject the admission of an innocent child's enrollment in the Book of Life and the path to eternal salvation?
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« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2011, 08:19:51 AM »

On what grounds would the church reject the admission of an innocent child's enrollment in the Book of Life and the path to eternal salvation?

This is true, I have to admit. If not baptized in the Orthodox Church and the child died, it'd go straight to hell. Better safe than sorry.
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« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2011, 08:50:27 AM »

It may seem strange because of the question as to why a non-Orthodox parent would desire to have their infant baptised in the Orthodox Church, but it is my understanding that the parents canonical standing with the church (or lack of standing as in the question in this topic) is not an issue with regard to an infant candidate's proposed Baptism, Chrismation, and first Holy Communion.  The Godparent would be responsible to have the child raised in the church.  On what grounds would the church reject the admission of an innocent child's enrollment in the Book of Life and the path to eternal salvation?
That's what I've been told, as I asked my priest what would happen if I was to give birth while still in my catechumenate period and wanted the child baptized. But I don't know if that's because we are catechumens or if that is a general rule across the board.

 Huh The parents should optimally be Orthodox, but I don't see the logic behind denying the child the baptism, especially if he or she has Orthodox grandparents, relatives, or sponsors that will be there to guide him/her in his life as an Orthodox Christian. The baptism is all about the CHILD.
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« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2011, 09:44:19 AM »


I don't think the Church would deny baptism to the child.  It would have to have Orthodox godparents, and it would be on them to raise this child Orthodox, if the parents failed.

Personally, I also wouldn't "wait" until the whole household is ready.  Why wait?

I was a premature baby and therefore, was baptized on Day 3 of life.  It was the best thing my mother ever did for me!  (....and she's done many wonderful things for me.)
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« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2011, 02:25:32 PM »

Well, a good reason to wait until the family is received would be because plenty of people stop coming to church during their catechumenate for different reasons. My priest now has people wait a year because too many were getting baptized and then would get burned out or disinterested in a few months after the sparks settled down. If we are specifically talking about parents that are waiting to be received, then it makes perfect sense to have the household baptized together. If the child's life is in danger before that time comes, anyone can baptized the kid in an emergency. It doesn't matter if the kid has a godparent if the parents decide to leave Orthodoxy and take their children with them.
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« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2011, 03:16:43 PM »

If not baptized in the Orthodox Church and the child died, it'd go straight to hell. Better safe than sorry.

Is that a known fact or just a surmise on the part of the Orthodox Church?

And do all Orthodox believe this, or just some?  IOW, is it essential to being fully Orthodox that one accept this as a fact?
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« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2011, 03:21:43 PM »

If not baptized in the Orthodox Church and the child died, it'd go straight to hell. Better safe than sorry.

Is that a known fact or just a surmise on the part of the Orthodox Church?

And do all Orthodox believe this, or just some?  IOW, is it essential to being fully Orthodox that one accept this as a fact?

I apologize, I was in something of a bad mood this morning. The above was meant to be a sarcastic response. I think the opposite is true, so reading stuff about "enrollment in the Book of Life and the path to eternal salvation" just seemed very over the top to me. And I responded poorly.
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« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2011, 03:27:17 PM »

One can believe that baptism is salvific and essential and reject the idea that all unbaptized infants burn in hell absolutely and without question.  What happens after death is a great mystery.


If not baptized in the Orthodox Church and the child died, it'd go straight to hell. Better safe than sorry.

Is that a known fact or just a surmise on the part of the Orthodox Church?

And do all Orthodox believe this, or just some?  IOW, is it essential to being fully Orthodox that one accept this as a fact?

I apologize, I was in something of a bad mood this morning. The above was meant to be a sarcastic response. I think the opposite is true, so reading stuff about "enrollment in the Book of Life and the path to eternal salvation" just seemed very over the top to me. And I responded poorly.
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« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2011, 03:29:37 PM »

One can believe that baptism is salvific and essential and reject the idea that all unbaptized infants burn in hell absolutely and without question.  What happens after death is a great mystery.

Yep.
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« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2011, 05:28:41 PM »

So, would a child be churched if born while its parents were still catechumen, or would it simply be considered a very young inquirer?
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