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Author Topic: The south Chicago Suburbs  (Read 735 times) Average Rating: 0
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jazzologist
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« on: September 10, 2011, 06:18:17 AM »

Can someone tell me of Orthodox churches in the South Chicago suburban area. With the boundaries on the north - Blue Island; south Park Forest and west Orland Park
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mike
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2011, 06:33:39 AM »

Try here: http://www.scoba.us/directory.html?parish=&clergy=&city=chicago&state=-1&searchType=parish
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2011, 10:27:52 AM »

this is better
http://www.orthodoxyinamerica.org/
there are lots.
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jazzologist
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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2011, 05:39:44 AM »

Thank you. This is a major help!
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TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2011, 09:41:44 AM »

If you like a parish with lots going on, may I suggest St. Luke (OCA) in Palos Hills? I have friends there and it's a wonderfully vibrant parish.

http://www.stlukeorthodox.com/
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serb1389
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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2011, 05:51:48 PM »

Can someone tell me of Orthodox churches in the South Chicago suburban area. With the boundaries on the north - Blue Island; south Park Forest and west Orland Park

St. Spiridon's GO church in Orland Park is phenomenal.  Highly recommended. 
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TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2011, 10:50:09 PM »

Can someone tell me of Orthodox churches in the South Chicago suburban area. With the boundaries on the north - Blue Island; south Park Forest and west Orland Park

St. Spiridon's GO church in Orland Park is phenomenal.  Highly recommended.  

IIRC, Jazzologist is in the process of converting. Do you really recommend a convert go to a GOA parish in the Chicago area? That is, if they're not married to a Greek?  Wink

How's the Greek-English mix at St. Spiridon's? I know there are a fair number of Chicago-area GOA parishes with services primarily in Greek. Frankly, I don't see the point in throwing a person who doesn't know Greek into a parish with services primarily in Greek when there are English-language services available in the area.

Many of the clergy I've met are OK, but the average folks I've met in the GOA parishes are still rather attached to their Greek heritage and can be rather rude to non-Greeks. I've experienced it myself. You walk into the parish and the first question you're asked is about your ethnic background. The person at the candle desk is like the parish guardian. The yia-yias I've encountered would probably be great at questioning terrorism suspects! It's a rare occasion when the 20 questions do NOT get asked! I suppose if one actually knew some Greek, they might be received a bit differently. I know of *priests* from other jurisdictions who've been treated extremely shabbily by Chicago-area GOA parishioners (I've heard it from the priests themselves), just for the priest not being Greek. I know Chicago-area GOA *priests* who've told me their parishes aren't the best place for non-Greeks.

This is my personal experience and what I've been told by GOA priests.

ETA: I just wanted to add that I'm actually trying to NOT come down hard on the GOA folks I've met in the Chicago area, but it's quite different in this area than those in other parts of this US that have less of a Greek population.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2011, 11:11:52 PM by TheodoraElizabeth3 » Logged
TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2011, 11:04:25 PM »

There's also St. Mary's, an Antiochian parish in Alsip. Not sure about the Arabic/English mix.

http://www.virginmaryoc.org/

Here's the website for St. Luke's, the OCA parish in Palos Hills. If you like a parish that does a lot of charitable work, St. Luke's hosts homeless woman and children overnight one night a week (October - April) as part of the PADS program (different churches take different nights).

http://www.stlukeorthodox.com/

« Last Edit: September 11, 2011, 11:05:29 PM by TheodoraElizabeth3 » Logged
serb1389
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« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2011, 01:12:39 AM »

Can someone tell me of Orthodox churches in the South Chicago suburban area. With the boundaries on the north - Blue Island; south Park Forest and west Orland Park

St. Spiridon's GO church in Orland Park is phenomenal.  Highly recommended.  

IIRC, Jazzologist is in the process of converting. Do you really recommend a convert go to a GOA parish in the Chicago area? That is, if they're not married to a Greek?  Wink

How's the Greek-English mix at St. Spiridon's? I know there are a fair number of Chicago-area GOA parishes with services primarily in Greek. Frankly, I don't see the point in throwing a person who doesn't know Greek into a parish with services primarily in Greek when there are English-language services available in the area.

Many of the clergy I've met are OK, but the average folks I've met in the GOA parishes are still rather attached to their Greek heritage and can be rather rude to non-Greeks. I've experienced it myself. You walk into the parish and the first question you're asked is about your ethnic background. The person at the candle desk is like the parish guardian. The yia-yias I've encountered would probably be great at questioning terrorism suspects! It's a rare occasion when the 20 questions do NOT get asked! I suppose if one actually knew some Greek, they might be received a bit differently. I know of *priests* from other jurisdictions who've been treated extremely shabbily by Chicago-area GOA parishioners (I've heard it from the priests themselves), just for the priest not being Greek. I know Chicago-area GOA *priests* who've told me their parishes aren't the best place for non-Greeks.

This is my personal experience and what I've been told by GOA priests.

ETA: I just wanted to add that I'm actually trying to NOT come down hard on the GOA folks I've met in the Chicago area, but it's quite different in this area than those in other parts of this US that have less of a Greek population.


I've only ever been there on weekdays, so I can't tell you on Sundays.  On weekdays it was primarily in Greek.  Even before I knew Greek I would go here to pray.  It was a place where I literally always felt the grace of the HS.  The priest there is a real spiritual father.  a man of prayer & love.  To me, those are the things that count.  Not what language it's in.  If you want to have an authentic orthodox experience & feel the grace of God, then go.  If you're scarred b/c of the language...well...good luck. 
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TheodoraElizabeth3
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« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2011, 01:36:59 PM »

Scarred or scared? Cheesy

In any case, I'm one of those "$&^&%1 [insert curse word of choice] converts" who sees absolutely no point in sticking someone coming to Orthodoxy into a parish where services are primarily in another language, IF there are English-language parishes within a reasonable drive.

Someone coming to Orthodoxy has enough to deal with, without throwing up a language barrier.

If someone has a talent for languages or is interested in Greek culture, that's a different case, but that's not the situation many inquirers are in.

Illustrative example: your normal American guy inquirer, someone I know, had been attending a GOA parish for some months. He went as he really liked the priest. However, he was isolated in the parish, people never spoke with him at coffee hour, he sat in a corner by himself - he's not Greek. He tried to get his family to come to church, but after 1-2 services (almost totally in Greek), they refused to attend anymore. He's now attending an an English-language parish and the kids are *asking* to attend church (wife still hasn't come around due to bad experience with the language issue at the GOA parish).
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serb1389
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« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2011, 02:20:54 PM »

Scarred or scared? Cheesy

In any case, I'm one of those "$&^&%1 [insert curse word of choice] converts" who sees absolutely no point in sticking someone coming to Orthodoxy into a parish where services are primarily in another language, IF there are English-language parishes within a reasonable drive.

Someone coming to Orthodoxy has enough to deal with, without throwing up a language barrier.

If someone has a talent for languages or is interested in Greek culture, that's a different case, but that's not the situation many inquirers are in.

Illustrative example: your normal American guy inquirer, someone I know, had been attending a GOA parish for some months. He went as he really liked the priest. However, he was isolated in the parish, people never spoke with him at coffee hour, he sat in a corner by himself - he's not Greek. He tried to get his family to come to church, but after 1-2 services (almost totally in Greek), they refused to attend anymore. He's now attending an an English-language parish and the kids are *asking* to attend church (wife still hasn't come around due to bad experience with the language issue at the GOA parish).

These one hitter stories are a dime a dozen.  I can give you many stories of the opposite happening.  I am not naive enough to say that "don't worry about the language" is the way to go.  I am saying that you shouldn't pass up on the experience, just because you don't understand it.  Don't NOT try just b/c of language.  Go and encounter Christ, in whatever language He presents himself.  You may be surprised.  That's all. 
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I got nothing.
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March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
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