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Author Topic: Demonic Aspects of Karate, etc.  (Read 7315 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #135 on: September 02, 2011, 03:51:10 PM »

Don't you guys know about the Hindu pope?

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« Reply #136 on: September 02, 2011, 04:01:57 PM »

Isnt this the Hindu pope?



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« Reply #137 on: September 02, 2011, 05:57:12 PM »

sauron, it has a big muscular chest and a frown and it is breathing fire. i think this is more for the purposes of violence then for lighting the barbeque.  Wink
of course i am not scared to look at it but it is not a pretty sight!
marc1152, no i did not see that show, most usa tv shows are not shown outside usa!
and also i don't have a tv (too busy going on internet forums to watch tv)!
 Wink
biro, thanks a lot for the info, i am relieved it's not a new craze to shop naked.
we couldn't do that in uk anyway, too cold and it rains a lot.
 Wink
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« Reply #138 on: September 02, 2011, 06:07:49 PM »

we couldn't do that in uk anyway, too cold and it rains a lot.

Not to get too graphic, but that would actually enhance the experience for any male voyeurs...  Cheesy
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« Reply #139 on: September 04, 2011, 12:16:53 PM »

actually, when i lived in brighton, they had a naked bike ride.
it was summer, and, for a change, it wasn't raining.
but it was a bit gross (uk english for disgusting and not very beautiful) to see naked men and women biking through the main shopping area.
i never found out what they were trying to achieve, i think they were saying that our way-too-liberal society is not yet liberal enough!

which takes me (sort of) back to the topic,
anyone know if sumo wrestling has a religious basis?
or is it just fat men who like to show off their wobbly bits and who also are not very keen on wearing too many clothes!
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« Reply #140 on: September 04, 2011, 01:11:20 PM »

I have heard that sumo wrestling has some basis in Shinto ritual. Sometimes it's on TV in the U.S., and I enjoy watching just for the spectacle.  Smiley
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« Reply #141 on: September 04, 2011, 03:13:21 PM »

i never found out what they were trying to achieve, i think they were saying that our way-too-liberal society is not yet liberal enough!

Brighton's specialty!
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« Reply #142 on: September 04, 2011, 03:28:00 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!
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« Reply #143 on: September 04, 2011, 03:42:49 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!

Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.

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« Reply #144 on: September 04, 2011, 04:51:51 PM »

wow, are u the sumo size?
coz that involves huge amounts of exercise, not just eating.
it's one of the (many) sports i would not be good at!
what is the connection between sumo and the shinto religion?
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« Reply #145 on: September 04, 2011, 05:50:48 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 05:51:28 PM by Marc1152 » Logged

Your idea has been debunked 1000 times already.. Maybe 1001 will be the charm
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« Reply #146 on: September 04, 2011, 06:38:08 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.

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« Reply #147 on: September 04, 2011, 06:42:18 PM »

wow, are u the sumo size?
coz that involves huge amounts of exercise, not just eating.
it's one of the (many) sports i would not be good at!
what is the connection between sumo and the shinto religion?

I am hardly "sumo size", although they aren't all blimps. My favorite sumo wrestler when I followed the sport at all was Terao, who was considerably smaller than most of his opponents.

Sumo training is the most exhausting workout I have ever had.

Here is a decent summary of the Shinto/sumo connections:
http://www.sumotalk.com/history.htm

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« Reply #148 on: September 04, 2011, 07:47:55 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.



You must admit it can be difficult for us to divine their motivations and thoughts at times, haha.
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« Reply #149 on: September 04, 2011, 08:21:50 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.



You must admit it can be difficult for us to divine their motivations and thoughts at times, haha.

I think it is an acquired skill. Any such issues I have with my wife I attribute to her being a woman rather than Japanese.  laugh

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« Reply #150 on: September 04, 2011, 09:17:31 PM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.



As the article says, this is not at all like American Wrestling. Uncovering a scandal like this one  is rare. What isnt rare is favoring a popular champion so he doesn't lose face.

Stage-managed bouts may be a staple of American professional wrestling, but sumo is Japan’s national sport, in a different league from World Wrestling Entertainment, many Japanese would say. Though allegations of match-fixing have accompanied sumo for decades, no wrestler has ever been caught orchestrating a match.  
« Last Edit: September 04, 2011, 09:18:04 PM by Marc1152 » Logged

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« Reply #151 on: September 04, 2011, 10:48:14 PM »

I just wanted to let you all know that b/c of a family situation I will not be able to respond to this thread until after Sept. 18th.  I also havn't read any posts since about 2 days ago on this topic.  Please forgive me & I look forward to continuing the convo after the 18th. 

- Serb1389. 
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« Reply #152 on: September 05, 2011, 09:24:47 AM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.



As the article says, this is not at all like American Wrestling. Uncovering a scandal like this one  is rare. What isnt rare is favoring a popular champion so he doesn't lose face.

Stage-managed bouts may be a staple of American professional wrestling, but sumo is Japan’s national sport, in a different league from World Wrestling Entertainment, many Japanese would say. Though allegations of match-fixing have accompanied sumo for decades, no wrestler has ever been caught orchestrating a match.  

That's my point. One of the reason's for sumo's waning popularity over the past several decades has been that everyone knows its rigged, so what's the point? The Freakonomics guys did not really surprise anyone.

Also, Japan's national sport is baseball.

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« Reply #153 on: September 05, 2011, 10:01:14 AM »

interesting.
i went to a shinto wedding in japan. there was no attempt to provide any translation (i'm sorry, my japanese is only good enough to find the exit or the toilet and to check the name of the strange seafood i'm eating).

i asked my friend later what had happened, but she wasn't sure. no-one there was particularly religious, they just thought it would be nice to have a religious wedding.
all i could work out was that it involved clapping to 'summon the spirits' and drinking sake.
i refrained from clapping, but the sake was nice!


Most Japanese, like most Americans, are not necessarily religious but will do religious things. For example, have a Shinto wedding or a Buddhist funeral. This is why you will often find Japanese telling you that they are Shinto and Buddhist, if asked.

There is certainly some connection between Shinto and sumo, although one is certainly not required to be a follower of Shinto in order to compete. I once participated in a sumo tournament at Ise Grand Shrine. The nice thing about participating in amateur sumo is that unlike professional sumo, it is not rigged.




Well...What looks rigged to us is merely good etiquette to them.

The Japanese didn't seem to think that this year's scandal was very polite or merely "looked rigged".
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/05/world/asia/05sumo.html

Yes yes, they are oh-so-inscrutable.



As the article says, this is not at all like American Wrestling. Uncovering a scandal like this one  is rare. What isnt rare is favoring a popular champion so he doesn't lose face.

Stage-managed bouts may be a staple of American professional wrestling, but sumo is Japan’s national sport, in a different league from World Wrestling Entertainment, many Japanese would say. Though allegations of match-fixing have accompanied sumo for decades, no wrestler has ever been caught orchestrating a match.  

That's my point. One of the reason's for sumo's waning popularity over the past several decades has been that everyone knows its rigged, so what's the point? The Freakonomics guys did not really surprise anyone.

Also, Japan's national sport is baseball.



They should combine the two sports.. Oh wait....That's Football, isnt it?

{{ made myself laugh  Tongue   }}}
« Last Edit: September 05, 2011, 10:02:15 AM by Marc1152 » Logged

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« Reply #154 on: September 05, 2011, 06:06:44 PM »

You must admit it can be difficult for us to divine their motivations and thoughts at times, haha.
That post reminded me of Sara Backer's American Fuji.

Can't really compare it to anything because it's one of my only fiction books about Japanese culture (besides Yoshiko Uchida's books, which are about Japanese-Americans), but her commentary on Japanese culture is hilarious. It's a fiction book but some of the characters are hysterical.
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« Reply #155 on: September 06, 2011, 11:29:25 AM »

You must admit it can be difficult for us to divine their motivations and thoughts at times, haha.
That post reminded me of Sara Backer's American Fuji.

Can't really compare it to anything because it's one of my only fiction books about Japanese culture (besides Yoshiko Uchida's books, which are about Japanese-Americans), but her commentary on Japanese culture is hilarious. It's a fiction book but some of the characters are hysterical.

Thank you and OK!
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