Author Topic: Apostles' Didache  (Read 782 times)

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Offline Reforming Protestant

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Apostles' Didache
« on: August 22, 2011, 09:00:18 AM »
Working on a web site that's dedicated to my journey from protestantism to orthodoxy. In my most recent post, I touched on the importance of the Apostles' Didache (doctrine), and how it was one of the authorities of the ancient believers. Additionally, I tried to show that the doctrine of Sola Scriptura would have been impossible for the 1st Century Christians to follow because the NT was not correctly introduced to the Church until 334 A.D. by Athanasius of Alexandria.

Was looking for a bit of feedback because I want to make sure that I am not degrading the importance of the scriptures and that my point that following the doctrine of the Apostles is one of the cornerstones of Christianity in terms of preserving the faith. You can check my post out here: http://www.protestantreforming.com/the-apostles-didache/

Many thanks!

Offline mabsoota

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2011, 09:53:56 AM »
it's true that it took some time to decide on the canon of scripture; however the early Christians had many of the new testament books separately. even in the 1st century, saint paul wrote to the Christians of colossae (4:16) that they should exchange letters with the church in laodicea (possibly meaning the letter to ephesians as these towns were close together). 

otherwise you make some very good points.
another thing i would add is while (as you pointed out) oral tradition is a laughable concept in cultures with european origins, it is very important in other cultures. in many asian and african countries (and indeed also in eastern europe) memorisation of poems and sacred texts is extremely important, so if the teacher stood at the front of the class and whispered a sentence to a child in a classroom of those cultures, the sentence would come back unchanged.
this sort of experience (in your school) merely shows that your classmates were raised in a culture in which oral tradition is not important. it does not tell us anything about the intrinsic value of oral tradition in the world.
i think you were sort of saying that.

also i like your picture of the voronet monastery.
may God enlighten you and your blog followers and give wisdom to the monks and scholars.

Offline katherineofdixie

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2011, 12:19:00 PM »
another thing i would add is while (as you pointed out) oral tradition is a laughable concept in cultures with european origins, it is very important in other cultures. in many asian and african countries (and indeed also in eastern europe) memorisation of poems and sacred texts is extremely important, so if the teacher stood at the front of the class and whispered a sentence to a child in a classroom of those cultures, the sentence would come back unchanged.
this sort of experience (in your school) merely shows that your classmates were raised in a culture in which oral tradition is not important. it does not tell us anything about the intrinsic value of oral tradition in the world.

Also I've seen studies of oral traditions where the accuracy is actually astonishing. I can't remember right off hand, but I can look for them if you're interested. It pretty much settled the question for me.
"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom

Offline Jason.Wike

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2011, 12:39:06 PM »
Actually oral tradition was very strong in Europe too until the past century. In Ireland and Wales researchers often found people reciting traditional stories and poetry up till the 40's and 50's that was almost exactly the same as the versions recorded over 500 years ago, that weren't in any kind of printed circulation.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2011, 12:39:43 PM by Jason.Wike »

Offline Reforming Protestant

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2011, 03:18:34 PM »
I wanted to establish that the Apostles' Doctrine was viewed as authoritative. I also wanted to touch on the fact that Sola Scriptura would have been technically impossible from approximately 33 to 334 A.D. because the cannon was not defined (initially) until 334 A.D. As you can see, in my post I made mention of the Church's oral tradition, but without a lot of emphasis. In my next post, I hope to expand on how Apostolic Succession and oral traditions helped transfer the faith from generation to generation.

Just read a book called Who's Bible is it? and it gave some pretty good examples of the preservation of poems and such via oral tradition. Thanks for the input!

Offline Shiny

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2011, 03:52:14 PM »
Actually St. Athansius' 39th Festal Letter, which included the NT canon, was from 367AD. Don't mean to nitpick, but not sure where you got the 334AD bit.
“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

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Offline Reforming Protestant

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Re: Apostles' Didache
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2011, 09:34:37 AM »
@Achronos

Good catch. You're right it was 367. The 334 came from the following: approximately 33 AD the Church was established via Pentecost, in 367 AD was the first time in history that the NT was correctly identified/quasi-established; therefore for 334 years (367 - 33) the early Christians were without a complete recognizable NT. sorry for the confusion