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Author Topic: For all us Celtophiles.  (Read 2430 times) Average Rating: 0
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Schultz
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« Reply #45 on: December 28, 2011, 10:07:56 AM »

Try telling a Highland Scot from, say, Ft William, that he's a "Celt" as to a Scot and he will laugh at you.  Tell a Cornishman that about some mythical pan-Celtic identity and he will wonder what you've been smoking.  Acting like the people of the so-called Celtic Fringe are alike in all but the mist vague ways is like acting the people of the Powhatan Confederacy  of Virginia are the same as the Lakota Sioux of the Northern Plains.  The term 'Celtic' as used now has as much ethnographic weight as 'Indian' does. 

And I write this as a proud descendant of the Irish, Scottish, and Welsh people.  I also wear a July as an everyday garment and did so daily for almost two years.  The term 'Celtic' as used by most people to mean some homogeneous cultural mores if the people who populated the aforementioned Celtic Fringe is meaningless.  You might as well say the Druids built Stonehenge.

First of all... The Druids didn't build Stonehenge? Shocked But how else could some ancient neolithic race have the knowledge to move those stones and put them in those positions with out the help of the Druids?  Huh Huh Huh Tongue

And second... when you say that you "wear a July as an everyday garment" do you mean a Kilt? Because I googled July just to see if I could find any garment under that name just to be sure that was a typo.

Blast!  Yes I meant kilt.  Bloody autocorrect!
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« Reply #46 on: December 28, 2011, 12:52:22 PM »

Try telling a Highland Scot from, say, Ft William, that he's a "Celt" as to a Scot and he will laugh at you.  Tell a Cornishman that about some mythical pan-Celtic identity and he will wonder what you've been smoking.  Acting like the people of the so-called Celtic Fringe are alike in all but the mist vague ways is like acting the people of the Powhatan Confederacy  of Virginia are the same as the Lakota Sioux of the Northern Plains.  The term 'Celtic' as used now has as much ethnographic weight as 'Indian' does. 

And I write this as a proud descendant of the Irish, Scottish, and Welsh people.  I also wear a July as an everyday garment and did so daily for almost two years.  The term 'Celtic' as used by most people to mean some homogeneous cultural mores if the people who populated the aforementioned Celtic Fringe is meaningless.  You might as well say the Druids built Stonehenge.

First of all... The Druids didn't build Stonehenge? Shocked But how else could some ancient neolithic race have the knowledge to move those stones and put them in those positions with out the help of the Druids?  Huh Huh Huh Tongue

And second... when you say that you "wear a July as an everyday garment" do you mean a Kilt? Because I googled July just to see if I could find any garment under that name just to be sure that was a typo.

Blast!  Yes I meant kilt.  Bloody autocorrect!

Just curious, ever worn it to church?
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« Reply #47 on: December 28, 2011, 12:54:44 PM »

Try telling a Highland Scot from, say, Ft William, that he's a "Celt" as to a Scot and he will laugh at you.  Tell a Cornishman that about some mythical pan-Celtic identity and he will wonder what you've been smoking.  Acting like the people of the so-called Celtic Fringe are alike in all but the mist vague ways is like acting the people of the Powhatan Confederacy  of Virginia are the same as the Lakota Sioux of the Northern Plains.  The term 'Celtic' as used now has as much ethnographic weight as 'Indian' does. 

And I write this as a proud descendant of the Irish, Scottish, and Welsh people.  I also wear a July as an everyday garment and did so daily for almost two years.  The term 'Celtic' as used by most people to mean some homogeneous cultural mores if the people who populated the aforementioned Celtic Fringe is meaningless.  You might as well say the Druids built Stonehenge.

First of all... The Druids didn't build Stonehenge? Shocked But how else could some ancient neolithic race have the knowledge to move those stones and put them in those positions with out the help of the Druids?  Huh Huh Huh Tongue

And second... when you say that you "wear a July as an everyday garment" do you mean a Kilt? Because I googled July just to see if I could find any garment under that name just to be sure that was a typo.

Blast!  Yes I meant kilt.  Bloody autocorrect!

Just curious, ever worn it to church?

I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.
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« Reply #48 on: December 28, 2011, 12:57:36 PM »


I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.

nice. my first priest wanted me to wear mine to church one day to get a point across to the parishoners about being more accepting. this was a Greek parish. I never did though... well not to an Orthodox parish
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« Reply #49 on: December 28, 2011, 01:02:55 PM »


I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.

nice. my first priest wanted me to wear mine to church one day to get a point across to the parishoners about being more accepting. this was a Greek parish. I never did though... well not to an Orthodox parish

When I wore one to the Greek festival at the Cathedral in Baltimore, one of the parishoners, a rather swarthy, charming fellow, came up to me, embraced me Greek style and said, "Ah, you must be Greek!"

He then proceeded to tell us about the "beautiful mousaka" downstairs.

Hard for Greeks to say anything when they wear those little skirts themselves.
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« Reply #50 on: December 28, 2011, 01:05:45 PM »


I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.

nice. my first priest wanted me to wear mine to church one day to get a point across to the parishoners about being more accepting. this was a Greek parish. I never did though... well not to an Orthodox parish

When I wore one to the Greek festival at the Cathedral in Baltimore, one of the parishoners, a rather swarthy, charming fellow, came up to me, embraced me Greek style and said, "Ah, you must be Greek!"

He then proceeded to tell us about the "beautiful mousaka" downstairs.

Hard for Greeks to say anything when they wear those little skirts themselves.

Funny, and true! I doubt those at my Antiochian parish would be very accepting of my wearing a kilt to church. Outside of the church, not a problem.
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« Reply #51 on: December 28, 2011, 03:00:24 PM »


I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.

nice. my first priest wanted me to wear mine to church one day to get a point across to the parishoners about being more accepting. this was a Greek parish. I never did though... well not to an Orthodox parish

When I wore one to the Greek festival at the Cathedral in Baltimore, one of the parishoners, a rather swarthy, charming fellow, came up to me, embraced me Greek style and said, "Ah, you must be Greek!"

He then proceeded to tell us about the "beautiful mousaka" downstairs.

Hard for Greeks to say anything when they wear those little skirts themselves.

Funny, and true! I doubt those at my Antiochian parish would be very accepting of my wearing a kilt to church. Outside of the church, not a problem.
A subdeacon of Scots-Irish ancestry wore one in our parish on Sunday of Orthodoxy (concealed when serving,  of course,but later carrying a St. Patrick icon). No one seemed to pay any matter of mind & for me being Arabic & Welsh, an expression of another ancestry.
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« Reply #52 on: December 28, 2011, 07:18:06 PM »

kilt -> july - autocorrect?  Huh

Ok, for those from Donegal and those from Cork, need to find out if there are any long-lost relatives hiding on here ...

where in Donegal ??

Anyone from Newtoncunningham, St Johnstown, Monfad, or Murlough,

where in Cork?

How about Rathcormac or Lisgoold?

Many years,

Neil
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« Reply #53 on: December 28, 2011, 09:12:09 PM »

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« Reply #54 on: February 06, 2012, 02:47:57 AM »

If anyone is interested. The BBC have a series, "A history of Celtic Britain", with Scottish presenter Neil Oliver.
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« Reply #55 on: February 06, 2012, 03:43:08 AM »

A subdeacon of Scots-Irish ancestry wore one in our parish on Sunday of Orthodoxy (concealed when serving,  of course,but later carrying a St. Patrick icon).

Of course most Scots-Irish were not Highlanders, and thus most never wore kilts.  I guess figuring out that they're not Irish is a start though.
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« Reply #56 on: February 06, 2012, 03:57:35 AM »


I stopped wearing them full time before I became Orthodox, but I wore them to my Greek Catholic church.  Everyone loved it.

nice. my first priest wanted me to wear mine to church one day to get a point across to the parishoners about being more accepting. this was a Greek parish. I never did though... well not to an Orthodox parish

When I wore one to the Greek festival at the Cathedral in Baltimore, one of the parishoners, a rather swarthy, charming fellow, came up to me, embraced me Greek style and said, "Ah, you must be Greek!"

He then proceeded to tell us about the "beautiful mousaka" downstairs.

Hard for Greeks to say anything when they wear those little skirts themselves.

I wouldn't put it past them.
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« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2012, 08:30:37 AM »

If anyone is interested. The BBC have a series, "A history of Celtic Britain", with Scottish presenter Neil Oliver.
Thanks! Btw, the last episode of the podcast series was recently posted.
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« Reply #58 on: February 06, 2012, 08:43:55 AM »

Quote from: Irish Melkite
And second... when you say that you "wear a July as an everyday garment" do you mean a Kilt? Because I googled July just to see if I could find any garment under that name just to be sure that was a typo.
Blast!  Yes I meant kilt.  Bloody autocorrect!
kilt -> july - autocorrect?  Huh


Ok, I couldn't let this go and finally figured it out. Either Schultz has fat fingers and doesn't want to admit it or his autocorrect is correcting on the basis of the adjacent keys, j and u for k and i. Any bets to be had on which it was?

Many years,

Neil (where's a smirk emoticon when you need one?)
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« Reply #59 on: February 06, 2012, 10:01:40 AM »

Quote from: Irish Melkite
And second... when you say that you "wear a July as an everyday garment" do you mean a Kilt? Because I googled July just to see if I could find any garment under that name just to be sure that was a typo.
Blast!  Yes I meant kilt.  Bloody autocorrect!
kilt -> july - autocorrect?  Huh


Ok, I couldn't let this go and finally figured it out. Either Schultz has fat fingers and doesn't want to admit it or his autocorrect is correcting on the basis of the adjacent keys, j and u for k and i. Any bets to be had on which it was?

Many years,

Neil (where's a smirk emoticon when you need one?)

I DO NOT HAVE FAT FINGERS! Wink
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« Reply #60 on: February 06, 2012, 01:38:22 PM »

A subdeacon of Scots-Irish ancestry wore one in our parish on Sunday of Orthodoxy (concealed when serving,  of course,but later carrying a St. Patrick icon).

Of course most Scots-Irish were not Highlanders, and thus most never wore kilts.  I guess figuring out that they're not Irish is a start though.

A lot of what is now the "Lowlands" used to be the Highlands though. People used to speak Gaelic even in Galloway. Back when I used to read the Scotsman it was always depressing to hear of people from places with thoroughly Gaelic names, who had Gaelic names themselves like "Iain Duncan" (just a made up example), who said Gaelic was "foreign" and they shouldn't be having any Gaelic medium education in their towns.
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« Reply #61 on: February 06, 2012, 01:54:22 PM »

The website Learn Gaelic is for Scots Gaelic. I think they also have a site for Irish.  Smiley
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