Author Topic: Local Dialects  (Read 979 times)

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Online Justin Kissel

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Local Dialects
« on: August 12, 2011, 12:05:53 PM »
This here thread is dedicated to the funny way all yuns people talk. Sometimes yuns guys say something and I have nary a clue what you mean. I have also been informed that my sophisticated vocabulary is also misunderstood by those of you with deficient educations. I offer the following as a corrective. May you also find some benefit from explaining your own strange ways of communicationing.

red up - to clean up

warsh - people in most of the country incorrectly pronounce this "wash". There is also a Warshington D.C.

crick - while some people improperly use it to speak of a problem in your neck or back, it's actually just the proper pronounciation of creek.

yuns/yens/yins - a northern version of y'all, only more regal

yinzer - a fine, upstanding, intelligent person from southwestern pennsylvania, who from time to time likes to participate in recreational activities such as cheering on competitive athletes who are engaged in noble battle, and who express--nay, manifest--that which is most divine about the spirit of man

chipped ham - ham that is sliced very thin

jaggers - thorns

dippy egg - eggs you can dip toast in

gum band - what other people may call a rubber band

spicket - where you get water from

clicker - remote control

sweeper - known elsewhere as a vacuum cleaner

nebby - to pry or stick your nose where it doesn't belong

slippy - brevity is highly prized here, so we shortened the overlong and vague "slippery" to something more precise and eloquent

jumbo - balogna

mile - a unit of measurement, the plural for "mile".

greazy - the proper pronounciation for "greasy"
« Last Edit: August 12, 2011, 12:07:05 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Schultz

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2011, 12:10:51 PM »
If I may add:

hans - No, not a German name, but, as noted, brevity is prized in the Holy Land of Western Pennsylvania and this is, therefore, the proper pronunciation of "hands"

warsh - proper pronunciation of "wash"

Also note that the verb "to be" is not needed when using the word "needs," as in "The car needs washed." 

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Offline orthonorm

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2011, 01:03:36 PM »
This here thread is dedicated to the funny way all yuns people talk. Sometimes yuns guys say something and I have nary a clue what you mean. I have also been informed that my sophisticated vocabulary is also misunderstood by those of you with deficient educations. I offer the following as a corrective. May you also find some benefit from explaining your own strange ways of communicationing.

red up - to clean up

warsh - people in most of the country incorrectly pronounce this "wash". There is also a Warshington D.C.

crick - while some people improperly use it to speak of a problem in your neck or back, it's actually just the proper pronounciation of creek.

yuns/yens/yins - a northern version of y'all, only more regal

yinzer - a fine, upstanding, intelligent person from southwestern pennsylvania, who from time to time likes to participate in recreational activities such as cheering on competitive athletes who are engaged in noble battle, and who express--nay, manifest--that which is most divine about the spirit of man

chipped ham - ham that is sliced very thin

jaggers - thorns

dippy egg - eggs you can dip toast in

gum band - what other people may call a rubber band

spicket - where you get water from

clicker - remote control

sweeper - known elsewhere as a vacuum cleaner

nebby - to pry or stick your nose where it doesn't belong

slippy - brevity is highly prized here, so we shortened the overlong and vague "slippery" to something more precise and eloquent

jumbo - balogna

mile - a unit of measurement, the plural for "mile".

greazy - the proper pronounciation for "greasy"

No time to add much. The bolded ones are what we used growing up. The red, variations on the theme.

dippit eggs

---------------quick adds

yonder or yond often with "fur". The feed store is a fur piece yonda second dip on ya right.

pert near

here her (hair): Come here her! Germanism carried over.

Please? : Asking someone to repeat what they said. Another Germanism

Schrank : any large cabinet of sorts, another Germanism

pin = pen or pin, thus using the word ink pen to avoid confusion. I still struggle to make that sound. Pinnsylvania. Pig pin.

britches = jean or whatever you wore that wasn't fit for church

slacks = "dress" pants

hard shoes = "dress" shoes

ain't

t'weren't

twain

oughtn't

coke = any soft drink

learn = to teach a "lesson". I'll learn ya.

Can I add class and race slang and related phrases that were part and parcel of daily speech that might be offensive?

sled riding = sledding. Germanism

dinner = lunch

supper = dinner

cain't = can't

reckon = used profusely with a wide range of meaning

we cut grass, never mowed a lawn

tobacca = tobacco

yard sale = no garage sales or whatever else people who have such fancy things have

yard salen = to go to yard sales

multiple negative for emphasis = Ain't no one never done no such thing.

done = almost any verb

I'll stay way from PROnunciation, fur that'll keep us here pert near ever. et = ate, etc.

woods = never heard of a forest

neck of the woods

folks = people? persons? please, except

your people / my people / their people = family and hangers on, usually when a threat is implied

fetch

right quick

tan = not to lie in the sun in leisure but tan hides, usually your kids via repeated hitting with a switch or paddle

maybe more later
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Offline genesisone

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2011, 01:42:10 PM »

red up - to clean up

sweeper - known elsewhere as a vacuum cleaner

My mother-in-law grew up in northeastern Pennsylvania. I remember hearing her use these words on a regular basis. My wife has been known to use "red up", but I haven't heard it from her recently.

Offline elephant

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2011, 02:41:20 PM »
We would sit on the davenport drinking pop out of the icebox.

Love, elephant.

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Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2011, 04:57:12 PM »
arn: as in iron

awl: Pennsylvania crude

fahr: a state of combustion

stiller: one who labors making steel
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2011, 06:56:35 PM »
One I notice (and use) all the time in Chicago is "Can you borrow me a dollar" for "lend me a dollar."
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline celticfan1888

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2011, 08:15:57 PM »
Oh my...the people in Louisiana use very unique language...

Joie de Vivre (zhwa-d-veev) - attitude towards life

Café au Lait (kah-fay-oh-lay) - coffee with steamed milk

Beignet (ben-yea) - doughnut with powdered sugar

Lagniappe (lan-yap) - cajun french for "something extra"

Laissez les bon temps rouler (lay-zay lay bon ton rule-ay) - cajun french for "let the good times roll!"

Pirogue (pee-row) - AKA a canoe

Tasso (tah-soh) - AKA jerky

Coonass (koon-ass) - what proud cajuns call themselves (or atleast from what I've seen).
« Last Edit: August 12, 2011, 08:22:23 PM by celticfan1888 »
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Offline ialmisry

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« Last Edit: August 13, 2011, 12:50:30 PM by ialmisry »
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline celticfan1888

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2011, 02:10:45 PM »
it's called French.

It's called Cajun French...it's alot different.
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Offline bogdan

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2011, 02:20:00 PM »
Crick - correct pronunciation of "creek"

Melk - correct pronunciation of "milk"

De-thaw - to de-ice or thaw

Lookit - "Look at it", "Listen here", or similar

You guys - "y'all", "yous", "yins", "you lot", or similar

Kyna - "kind of"

Imunna - "I'm going to"

Kitty-corner - diagonally across from something; variant of "cater-corner"

Tempatchur - correct pronunciation of "temperature"

Sament (sa-MENT) - correct pronunciation of "cement"

Broekjes (BRUKE-yahs) - pants or underwear
« Last Edit: August 13, 2011, 02:35:02 PM by bogdan »

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2011, 02:37:44 PM »
Crick - correct pronunciation of "creek"

Melk - correct pronunciation of "milk"

De-thaw - to de-ice or thaw

Lookit - "Look at it", "Listen here", or similar

You guys - "y'all", "yous", "yins", "you lot", or similar

Kyna - "kind of"

Imunna - "I'm going to"

Kitty-corner - diagonally across from something; variant of "cater-corner"

Tempatchur - correct pronunciation of "temperature"

Sament (sa-MENT) - correct pronunciation of "cement"

Broekjes (BRUKE-yahs) - pants or underwear
Interesting thing about the Americans: everyone else bases their speach on some center. Americans did it on a periphery
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2011, 02:39:59 PM »
it's called French.

It's called Cajun French...it's alot different.
Vive la différence!!!
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Online Justin Kissel

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Re: Local Dialects
« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2011, 02:48:22 PM »
Broekjes (BRUKE-yahs) - pants or underwear