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Author Topic: Share your liturgical mishap stories here!  (Read 18819 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #180 on: November 21, 2013, 05:13:05 PM »


Next time I see them, I'll have to ask if they saw me going up in flames or not!   angel
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« Reply #181 on: November 21, 2013, 05:14:35 PM »

The one on the left is thinking: "I feel conflicted. I should probably warn her. But on the other hand bishops need to have good stories to tell, so maybe I should wait to see how this plays out..."

The hierarch in blue is either enraptured in deep contemplation or he noticed what happened and thought to himself: "Oh my God, look what she did to herself!"  Tongue

Now I can't look at this photo without wondering what they were thinking! LOL!


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« Reply #182 on: November 21, 2013, 05:15:31 PM »


Next time I see them, I'll have to ask if they saw me going up in flames or not!   angel

If they are good bishops, they will never admit to having been distracted by a hot woman during the Liturgy. 
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« Reply #183 on: November 21, 2013, 05:23:19 PM »


Well then....I'll never know.
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« Reply #184 on: November 21, 2013, 05:31:32 PM »

Hmm... in my case, I was at Liturgy at St. Athanasius in Gulf Shores, when it was only the priest. And I mean ONLY. The altarboys and reader showed up just in time for the Gospel.
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« Reply #185 on: December 06, 2013, 10:16:04 PM »

We've had smoke alarms go off during the liturgy.

Then there was the deacon who took his prayer book and swatted a fly on the altar.

I've heard an urban legend about naughty altar boys mixing popcorn kernels with the incense.  I don't know if that has ever really happened, though.

Something like that happened to me once. An altar boy put some kind of candy in the censer that popped.

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« Reply #186 on: December 08, 2013, 04:13:11 AM »

I was attending a Divine Liturgy once served by two priests. During the Great Entrance, somehow the Bread slipped off the diskos while they stood in the Royal Doors. They handled it quite well I thought.

Once, during a Bishop's visistation, one of the choir members fainted in the choir loft.
Once when my Bishop visited, he became ill during the Divine Liturgy. He asked me to hold him up when he blessed the people with the candles at the Trisagion. After the Great Entrance, he told me to take over. A few minutes later, as I was praying the Anaphora, I glanced over and saw His Grace lying on the floor with his head in a waste basket in case he vomited and an altar server fanning him with a large piece of cardboard. I continued with the Liturgy as if nothing had happened, because once a Liturgy is begun it is not stopped for anything. Even if I were to drop dead during the Liturgy, they would have to move my body, leave everything where it was when I died and get another Priest to come and finish the Liturgy. His grace has recovered and is doing well.
I once was service as the server during a Presanctified Liturgy. The priest accidentally turned several pages at once and almost left out a large portion of the Liturgy. in our tradition the Presanctified Liturgy is never concelebrated. The priest never wears a pectoral cross or epignathion when he serves the Presanctified Liturgy.
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« Reply #187 on: December 08, 2013, 10:31:33 PM »

I was at a wedding where the priest was doing the crowning for the groom and loudly intoned, "The handmaiden of God" when he meant the groom. He didn't correct himself. I don't think he realized what he did.
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« Reply #188 on: December 08, 2013, 10:37:05 PM »

^ Fun  Cheesy was I there?
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« Reply #189 on: December 08, 2013, 10:42:43 PM »

^ Fun  Cheesy was I there?

No, I think it was before your time.
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« Reply #190 on: December 08, 2013, 10:50:58 PM »

Ah, still it is fun,  thanks for sharing.
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« Reply #191 on: December 09, 2013, 12:35:16 PM »

I did that once.  I also reversed the names of the bride and groom during the betrothal.  I was rather nervous...

I was at a wedding where the priest was doing the crowning for the groom and loudly intoned, "The handmaiden of God" when he meant the groom. He didn't correct himself. I don't think he realized what he did.
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« Reply #192 on: December 09, 2013, 12:37:13 PM »

Once when my Bishop visited, he became ill during the Divine Liturgy. He asked me to hold him up when he blessed the people with the candles at the Trisagion. After the Great Entrance, he told me to take over. A few minutes later, as I was praying the Anaphora, I glanced over and saw His Grace lying on the floor with his head in a waste basket in case he vomited and an altar server fanning him with a large piece of cardboard. I continued with the Liturgy as if nothing had happened, because once a Liturgy is begun it is not stopped for anything. Even if I were to drop dead during the Liturgy, they would have to move my body, leave everything where it was when I died and get another Priest to come and finish the Liturgy. His grace has recovered and is doing well.

I am not really sure I wanted to read that.
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« Reply #193 on: December 09, 2013, 12:40:41 PM »

Once when my Bishop visited, he became ill during the Divine Liturgy. He asked me to hold him up when he blessed the people with the candles at the Trisagion. After the Great Entrance, he told me to take over. A few minutes later, as I was praying the Anaphora, I glanced over and saw His Grace lying on the floor with his head in a waste basket in case he vomited and an altar server fanning him with a large piece of cardboard...His grace has recovered and is doing well.
I have heard this tale told in multiple DOM parishes. It's sort of legend.
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« Reply #194 on: December 09, 2013, 12:49:42 PM »

I was attending a Divine Liturgy once served by two priests. During the Great Entrance, somehow the Bread slipped off the diskos while they stood in the Royal Doors. They handled it quite well I thought.

Once, during a Bishop's visistation, one of the choir members fainted in the choir loft.
Once when my Bishop visited, he became ill during the Divine Liturgy. He asked me to hold him up when he blessed the people with the candles at the Trisagion. After the Great Entrance, he told me to take over. A few minutes later, as I was praying the Anaphora, I glanced over and saw His Grace lying on the floor with his head in a waste basket in case he vomited and an altar server fanning him with a large piece of cardboard. I continued with the Liturgy as if nothing had happened, because once a Liturgy is begun it is not stopped for anything. Even if I were to drop dead during the Liturgy, they would have to move my body, leave everything where it was when I died and get another Priest to come and finish the Liturgy. His grace has recovered and is doing well.
I once was service as the server during a Presanctified Liturgy. The priest accidentally turned several pages at once and almost left out a large portion of the Liturgy. in our tradition the Presanctified Liturgy is never concelebrated. The priest never wears a pectoral cross or epignathion when he serves the Presanctified Liturgy.
Fr. John W. Morris

Easier said than done about the leaving the body and finishing the liturgy. About forty years ago on Christmas morning at liturgy at St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Elizabeth, NJ,(my grandparent's parish) the 40 something pastor dropped dead following the gospel.(He left behind a young widow and family as I recall.) My aunt remembered that it was chaotic with people crying, standing around in shock and so on. The EMT's tried to save that priest as they took him to the hospital in a vain attempt to revive him. Several hours later, the dean came by and finished up, but by then only a curator or two were there just to keep an eye on things.
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« Reply #195 on: December 09, 2013, 01:13:27 PM »

When I was 12 and attending a modern-style Roman Catholic church, I passed out, very conspicuously, during Mass.  This church was in a half-circle, with all the pews at an slight incline looking down towards the altar.   When I got a bit dizzy before the time to go up for Communion, I went with my family where the line was way up to the back of the church.   At the back of the line, I really got dizzy and the last thing I remember was things starting to black out and me taking 1 step.   What then happened was I somehow was stumbling down the incline until I fell and hit my head on a pew about halfway down the aisle.  Some stranger  who was in the line in back of me had to pick me up and carry me out of the church where I did regain consciousness..  Ever since then I have had anxiety about standing in lines.  Shocked
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« Reply #196 on: December 11, 2013, 05:29:37 AM »

Not mine:

Metal iconostasis. Electrical lamps in front of icons. Breakthrough in the wires. Priest opens royal doors. Priest lands on altar table.
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« Reply #197 on: December 25, 2013, 06:14:49 AM »

Work in liturgical ministry long enough and you eventually pick up new material for this thread. I just picked up a new story tonight at our midnight Christmas liturgy. My choir director handed the Apostol to me during the Trisagion hymn and said, "You're reading the Epistle tonight." Fully expecting him to take the reading based on our earlier conversations today, I was caught totally off guard by his request but obeyed it anyway. I read from the Epistles every so often for our regular Sunday services, so this is nothing new to me. Even so, I do like to have some time to prepare so I know what I'm doing.

After receiving our priest's blessing to read, I opened the Apostol to the page to which my choir director pointed me but couldn't find the Prokeimenon on my first cursory scan, so I had to have him find it and read it just to get me started. I then had no time to find the correct reading. Noticing that the Bible on our readers' stand was opened to the right Epistle, I trusted at least that it might be the right reading, so I read what was there. I thought it didn't sound quite right to me, though, for it didn't exactly fit the Christmas festivities. (I found out later that I was supposed to have read from Galatians Chapter 4; I actually read from Galatians Chapter 2. At least the Bible was open to the right book, or else I would have REALLY been confused. Shocked)

Other than the opening hiccup with the Prokeimenon, I executed the reading so smoothly I doubt that most of the congregation even figured out I was reading the wrong lesson, but those who knew the rubrics knew that I had done something wrong. After I finished the reading and returned to my place in the choir, all my choir director could do was look at me and say, "Whoops! Embarrassed" I thought about saying, "Yeah, thanks buddy! Angry" but I knew that wouldn't be appropriate for Divine Liturgy. Oh well. At least when he finally told our priest after the service what had happened, Father congratulated me for how I handled the situation, though I'm still not exactly sure why.
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« Reply #198 on: December 25, 2013, 01:26:20 PM »

Work in liturgical ministry long enough and you eventually pick up new material for this thread. I just picked up a new story tonight at our midnight Christmas liturgy. My choir director handed the Apostol to me during the Trisagion hymn and said, "You're reading the Epistle tonight." Fully expecting him to take the reading based on our earlier conversations today, I was caught totally off guard by his request but obeyed it anyway. I read from the Epistles every so often for our regular Sunday services, so this is nothing new to me. Even so, I do like to have some time to prepare so I know what I'm doing.

After receiving our priest's blessing to read, I opened the Apostol to the page to which my choir director pointed me but couldn't find the Prokeimenon on my first cursory scan, so I had to have him find it and read it just to get me started. I then had no time to find the correct reading. Noticing that the Bible on our readers' stand was opened to the right Epistle, I trusted at least that it might be the right reading, so I read what was there. I thought it didn't sound quite right to me, though, for it didn't exactly fit the Christmas festivities. (I found out later that I was supposed to have read from Galatians Chapter 4; I actually read from Galatians Chapter 2. At least the Bible was open to the right book, or else I would have REALLY been confused. Shocked)

Other than the opening hiccup with the Prokeimenon, I executed the reading so smoothly I doubt that most of the congregation even figured out I was reading the wrong lesson, but those who knew the rubrics knew that I had done something wrong. After I finished the reading and returned to my place in the choir, all my choir director could do was look at me and say, "Whoops! Embarrassed" I thought about saying, "Yeah, thanks buddy! Angry" but I knew that wouldn't be appropriate for Divine Liturgy. Oh well. At least when he finally told our priest after the service what had happened, Father congratulated me for how I handled the situation, though I'm still not exactly sure why.

I can top that. One Great and Holy Saturday as I served the Vesperal Divine Liturgy, I listened to the chanter and kept thinking that what he was chanting did not seem to relate to the descent of Christ into Hell. I finally went out of the Altar to the chanter's stand to see what he was using and to my horror found that he was chanting the Royal Hours for the Nativity of Christ.

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« Reply #199 on: December 25, 2013, 01:30:37 PM »

In my parish, the chanters, bless their hearts, manage almost every week to reach for the same books at the same time, and wind up knocking stuff to the floor.   Smiley
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« Reply #200 on: December 25, 2013, 01:44:56 PM »

In my parish, the chanters, bless their hearts, manage almost every week to reach for the same books at the same time, and wind up knocking stuff to the floor.   Smiley

The Antiochian Archdiocese has eliminated all the confusion caused by having to use different books. Every weekend, the Archdiocese posts the complete text for Vespers and Matins on the Archdiocesan Web site. My secretary prints it and puts it on the chanter's stand. For holy week we have a book that has all the complete services, so that both the priest and the chanters do not have to use any other books.
interesting enough, the Archdiocese had to put the liturgical texts in pdf format because someone hacked our site and was rewriting the services to eliminate anything that could offend non Orthodox, especially Jews.

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« Reply #201 on: December 26, 2013, 11:32:43 AM »

Work in liturgical ministry long enough and you eventually pick up new material for this thread. I just picked up a new story tonight at our midnight Christmas liturgy. My choir director handed the Apostol to me during the Trisagion hymn and said, "You're reading the Epistle tonight." Fully expecting him to take the reading based on our earlier conversations today, I was caught totally off guard by his request but obeyed it anyway. I read from the Epistles every so often for our regular Sunday services, so this is nothing new to me. Even so, I do like to have some time to prepare so I know what I'm doing.

After receiving our priest's blessing to read, I opened the Apostol to the page to which my choir director pointed me but couldn't find the Prokeimenon on my first cursory scan, so I had to have him find it and read it just to get me started. I then had no time to find the correct reading. Noticing that the Bible on our readers' stand was opened to the right Epistle, I trusted at least that it might be the right reading, so I read what was there. I thought it didn't sound quite right to me, though, for it didn't exactly fit the Christmas festivities. (I found out later that I was supposed to have read from Galatians Chapter 4; I actually read from Galatians Chapter 2. At least the Bible was open to the right book, or else I would have REALLY been confused. Shocked)

Other than the opening hiccup with the Prokeimenon, I executed the reading so smoothly I doubt that most of the congregation even figured out I was reading the wrong lesson, but those who knew the rubrics knew that I had done something wrong. After I finished the reading and returned to my place in the choir, all my choir director could do was look at me and say, "Whoops! Embarrassed" I thought about saying, "Yeah, thanks buddy! Angry" but I knew that wouldn't be appropriate for Divine Liturgy. Oh well. At least when he finally told our priest after the service what had happened, Father congratulated me for how I handled the situation, though I'm still not exactly sure why.

I can top that. One Great and Holy Saturday as I served the Vesperal Divine Liturgy, I listened to the chanter and kept thinking that what he was chanting did not seem to relate to the descent of Christ into Hell. I finally went out of the Altar to the chanter's stand to see what he was using and to my horror found that he was chanting the Royal Hours for the Nativity of Christ.

Fr. John W. Morris

Our jurisdiction doesn't yet have an all-English Gospel book, so if the Gospel is to be read in English, we have to use a normal English-language Bible and write the reference on a post-it note so that the priest knows what to read.  Usually, the acolytes are good about taking the notes out after Liturgy so that there's no confusion next time, but one year they were sloppy.  On Annunciation, they put the post-it in Luke 1, but somehow left the Bible open to another place which also had a post-it note.  I didn't know this, but I thought it was weird that he was reading an account of the Last Supper.  Apparently, Father also thought it was weird, but didn't quite know what to do about it in mid-reading.  At about the time Judas asks Christ "Is it I (who will betray you)?" and Christ answers "What you have to do, do quickly", with a confused look on his face, knowing how bizarre that was, Father closed the Bible, blessed the people and went ahead with the Liturgy.  Smiley 
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« Reply #202 on: December 26, 2013, 12:40:46 PM »

Work in liturgical ministry long enough and you eventually pick up new material for this thread. I just picked up a new story tonight at our midnight Christmas liturgy. My choir director handed the Apostol to me during the Trisagion hymn and said, "You're reading the Epistle tonight." Fully expecting him to take the reading based on our earlier conversations today, I was caught totally off guard by his request but obeyed it anyway. I read from the Epistles every so often for our regular Sunday services, so this is nothing new to me. Even so, I do like to have some time to prepare so I know what I'm doing.

After receiving our priest's blessing to read, I opened the Apostol to the page to which my choir director pointed me but couldn't find the Prokeimenon on my first cursory scan, so I had to have him find it and read it just to get me started. I then had no time to find the correct reading. Noticing that the Bible on our readers' stand was opened to the right Epistle, I trusted at least that it might be the right reading, so I read what was there. I thought it didn't sound quite right to me, though, for it didn't exactly fit the Christmas festivities. (I found out later that I was supposed to have read from Galatians Chapter 4; I actually read from Galatians Chapter 2. At least the Bible was open to the right book, or else I would have REALLY been confused. Shocked)

Other than the opening hiccup with the Prokeimenon, I executed the reading so smoothly I doubt that most of the congregation even figured out I was reading the wrong lesson, but those who knew the rubrics knew that I had done something wrong. After I finished the reading and returned to my place in the choir, all my choir director could do was look at me and say, "Whoops! Embarrassed" I thought about saying, "Yeah, thanks buddy! Angry" but I knew that wouldn't be appropriate for Divine Liturgy. Oh well. At least when he finally told our priest after the service what had happened, Father congratulated me for how I handled the situation, though I'm still not exactly sure why.

I can top that. One Great and Holy Saturday as I served the Vesperal Divine Liturgy, I listened to the chanter and kept thinking that what he was chanting did not seem to relate to the descent of Christ into Hell. I finally went out of the Altar to the chanter's stand to see what he was using and to my horror found that he was chanting the Royal Hours for the Nativity of Christ.

Fr. John W. Morris

Our jurisdiction doesn't yet have an all-English Gospel book, so if the Gospel is to be read in English, we have to use a normal English-language Bible and write the reference on a post-it note so that the priest knows what to read.  Usually, the acolytes are good about taking the notes out after Liturgy so that there's no confusion next time, but one year they were sloppy.  On Annunciation, they put the post-it in Luke 1, but somehow left the Bible open to another place which also had a post-it note.  I didn't know this, but I thought it was weird that he was reading an account of the Last Supper.  Apparently, Father also thought it was weird, but didn't quite know what to do about it in mid-reading.  At about the time Judas asks Christ "Is it I (who will betray you)?" and Christ answers "What you have to do, do quickly", with a confused look on his face, knowing how bizarre that was, Father closed the Bible, blessed the people and went ahead with the Liturgy.  Smiley 

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris
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« Reply #203 on: December 26, 2013, 12:55:17 PM »

Oh my!  Shocked

That has got to be a heart stopping moment...
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« Reply #204 on: December 26, 2013, 01:31:34 PM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading.  

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine.  

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation?  
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« Reply #205 on: December 31, 2013, 11:51:49 PM »

We had a parishioner who had a heart attack during the Liturgy.  Our priest kept on going.



I think he's supposed to.

I read somewhere that a Divine liturgy must always be finished. If a priest dies while celebrating, another priest must finish where he left off.

That is correct. Once the Divine Liturgy is begun, it must be finished.

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« Reply #206 on: December 31, 2013, 11:55:07 PM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading. 

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine. 

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation? 

I do not know. Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. but I am not sure.
In Byzantine Tradition, at least as practiced in the Antiochian Archdiocese, the junior Priest always does the Proskoedia.

Fr. John W. Morris
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« Reply #207 on: December 31, 2013, 11:58:30 PM »

Work in liturgical ministry long enough and you eventually pick up new material for this thread. I just picked up a new story tonight at our midnight Christmas liturgy. My choir director handed the Apostol to me during the Trisagion hymn and said, "You're reading the Epistle tonight." Fully expecting him to take the reading based on our earlier conversations today, I was caught totally off guard by his request but obeyed it anyway. I read from the Epistles every so often for our regular Sunday services, so this is nothing new to me. Even so, I do like to have some time to prepare so I know what I'm doing.

After receiving our priest's blessing to read, I opened the Apostol to the page to which my choir director pointed me but couldn't find the Prokeimenon on my first cursory scan, so I had to have him find it and read it just to get me started. I then had no time to find the correct reading. Noticing that the Bible on our readers' stand was opened to the right Epistle, I trusted at least that it might be the right reading, so I read what was there. I thought it didn't sound quite right to me, though, for it didn't exactly fit the Christmas festivities. (I found out later that I was supposed to have read from Galatians Chapter 4; I actually read from Galatians Chapter 2. At least the Bible was open to the right book, or else I would have REALLY been confused. Shocked)

Other than the opening hiccup with the Prokeimenon, I executed the reading so smoothly I doubt that most of the congregation even figured out I was reading the wrong lesson, but those who knew the rubrics knew that I had done something wrong. After I finished the reading and returned to my place in the choir, all my choir director could do was look at me and say, "Whoops! Embarrassed" I thought about saying, "Yeah, thanks buddy! Angry" but I knew that wouldn't be appropriate for Divine Liturgy. Oh well. At least when he finally told our priest after the service what had happened, Father congratulated me for how I handled the situation, though I'm still not exactly sure why.

I can top that. One Great and Holy Saturday as I served the Vesperal Divine Liturgy, I listened to the chanter and kept thinking that what he was chanting did not seem to relate to the descent of Christ into Hell. I finally went out of the Altar to the chanter's stand to see what he was using and to my horror found that he was chanting the Royal Hours for the Nativity of Christ.

Fr. John W. Morris

Our jurisdiction doesn't yet have an all-English Gospel book, so if the Gospel is to be read in English, we have to use a normal English-language Bible and write the reference on a post-it note so that the priest knows what to read.  Usually, the acolytes are good about taking the notes out after Liturgy so that there's no confusion next time, but one year they were sloppy.  On Annunciation, they put the post-it in Luke 1, but somehow left the Bible open to another place which also had a post-it note.  I didn't know this, but I thought it was weird that he was reading an account of the Last Supper.  Apparently, Father also thought it was weird, but didn't quite know what to do about it in mid-reading.  At about the time Judas asks Christ "Is it I (who will betray you)?" and Christ answers "What you have to do, do quickly", with a confused look on his face, knowing how bizarre that was, Father closed the Bible, blessed the people and went ahead with the Liturgy.  Smiley 

Why don't you use the Greek or Antiochian Gospel Book?

Fr. John W. Morris
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« Reply #208 on: January 01, 2014, 12:24:40 AM »

Once a Priest was serving with the Bishop presiding from the throne. In our Antiochian Tradition, when the Bishop completes the Dismissal, the Priest says, "Through the prayer of our holy master...." He got confused and forgot the words. Finally the Bishop looked at the congregation and said, "Whatever."
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« Reply #209 on: January 01, 2014, 02:26:30 AM »

Why don't you use the Greek or Antiochian Gospel Book?

Our (West Syriac) lectionary differs significantly from your (Byzantine) lectionary, even though there are some ancient points of similarity. 
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« Reply #210 on: January 01, 2014, 06:30:57 AM »

Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy.

Why are priests needed then?
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« Reply #211 on: January 01, 2014, 12:22:05 PM »

Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy.

Why are priests needed then?

Your Roman Catholicism is showing. 
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« Reply #212 on: January 01, 2014, 02:26:23 PM »

Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy.

Why are priests needed then?

You need a Priest or Bishop to consecrate the gifts. A deacon can do a Typika and give Communion from the reserved Sacrament.
After thinking about this matter, I now think that the best thing to do would be to take some of the reserved Sacrament and put it into the Chalice because consecrated wine is poured on it before we dry it out and put it into the Tabernacle. That would be an exact parallel to what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. I should mention that I have never forgotten to put wine in the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris
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« Reply #213 on: January 01, 2014, 04:59:48 PM »

During one service we all did a metania, and as we came up, my head bumped into the butt of the lady in front of me!!  Shocked  At least we knew each other (we were both inquirers) so we laughed it off and moved on.

The deacon at that church has told us the story of the time he set an altar cloth on fire once while assisting during a Liturgy in another church. It had been freshly imported from Russia, this handmade, exquisitely beautiful cloth. He felt so awful about the accident that he emptied his savings to replace it.
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« Reply #214 on: January 04, 2014, 12:47:22 AM »

Has anyone ever seen something at liturgy that was really out of the ordinary, even an accident?  Like, the altar boys starting a fire, or, God forbid, the priest dropping the chalice?

I've heard of all this, but wonder if it's ever really happened?

I once served with the Bishop and several other Priests when we received a group of converts and their Priest was ordained who were forming a new mission. Because their mission was too small we borrowed a chapel in a Protestant Church. The Holy Table was on wheels and kept moving every time that the Bishop or one of the Priests touched it.  Finally one of the older Priests said, "That is just like Protestantism always changing."

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« Reply #215 on: January 04, 2014, 01:06:57 AM »

In my parish, the chanters, bless their hearts, manage almost every week to reach for the same books at the same time, and wind up knocking stuff to the floor.   Smiley

The Antiochian Archdiocese has eliminated all the confusion caused by having to use different books. Every weekend, the Archdiocese posts the complete text for Vespers and Matins on the Archdiocesan Web site. My secretary prints it and puts it on the chanter's stand. For holy week we have a book that has all the complete services, so that both the priest and the chanters do not have to use any other books.
interesting enough, the Archdiocese had to put the liturgical texts in pdf format because someone hacked our site and was rewriting the services to eliminate anything that could offend non Orthodox, especially Jews.

Fr. John W. Morris

The cynical side of me laughs at seeing the juxtaposition of Antiochian and "eliminates all confusion." But then we still use several books.
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« Reply #216 on: January 04, 2014, 01:11:48 AM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading. 

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine. 

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation? 

I do not know. Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. but I am not sure.
In Byzantine Tradition, at least as practiced in the Antiochian Archdiocese, the junior Priest always does the Proskoedia.

Fr. John W. Morris

I wonder if bishops keep their cell phones on in liturgy for just such emergencies.
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« Reply #217 on: January 04, 2014, 02:20:07 AM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading. 

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine. 

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation? 

I do not know. Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. but I am not sure.
In Byzantine Tradition, at least as practiced in the Antiochian Archdiocese, the junior Priest always does the Proskoedia.

Fr. John W. Morris

I wonder if bishops keep their cell phones on in liturgy for just such emergencies.

I learned not to take my cell phone with me to Church after it went off when I was reading one of the Gospels during  Holy Week.
The faithful should also turn off their cell phones. It is most distracting when someone opens their mouth to receive Communion and their cell phone goes off playing a tune.

Fr. John W. Morris
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« Reply #218 on: January 04, 2014, 03:00:09 AM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading. 

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine. 

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation? 

I do not know. Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. but I am not sure.
In Byzantine Tradition, at least as practiced in the Antiochian Archdiocese, the junior Priest always does the Proskoedia.

Fr. John W. Morris

I wonder if bishops keep their cell phones on in liturgy for just such emergencies.
What if it's the bishop's cell phone that starts ringing during the Divine Liturgy?
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« Reply #219 on: January 04, 2014, 02:36:36 PM »

Because the Gospel Book has several readings for different days on the same page, I have started to read where my eyes fell on the page, only to suddenly realize that I was reading the wrong Gospel. In my parish, we print the Gospel and Epistle every week and major feast day. A few days ago, the reader simply read from the Bulletin, instead of the Epistle Book and read the Gospel for the feast.

Smiley

In our Liturgy, we read from the Acts or one of the Catholic Epistles, in addition to reading from Paul and the Gospel.  Whenever the Catholic reading is taken from I John, we need to double-check that the reader actually is reading from the Epistle: I've witnessed all sorts of mishaps with that.  For instance, "The reading is from the First Epistle of St John...In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God...".  Usually we have to tackle the reader before they can finish in order to correct the reading. 

Quote
I suppose that the most terrible liturgical mishap that I have ever heard is the priest who was disturbed during the Proskomedia or preparation of the brad and wine which in the Byzantine Rite is done before the beginning of the Divine Liturgy by someone. Later during the Divine Liturgy, after the consecration, when it came time for him to drop a piece of the Lamb (consecrated Bread) he heard a thud and realized that he had forgotten to put wine into the Chalice.

Fr. John W. Morris

In our tradition, the preparation of the chalice is done by the priest/bishop who will celebrate the Liturgy, never by another, even if there are numerous concelebrants.  Is it not that way in Byzantine practice?  I've read all these horror stories about empty chalices but I can't imagine how you wouldn't notice if you were the one pouring in the wine. 

Edit: never mind, Father, I see that you wrote he was interrupted during the preparation...I read too quickly.

And how did that story end?  What is done in such a situation? 

I do not know. Theoretically, the piece of consecrated lamb that is dropped into the Chalice would consecrate the unconsecrated wine, because that is what is done during the Presanctified Divine Liturgy. but I am not sure.
In Byzantine Tradition, at least as practiced in the Antiochian Archdiocese, the junior Priest always does the Proskoedia.

Fr. John W. Morris

I wonder if bishops keep their cell phones on in liturgy for just such emergencies.
What if it's the bishop's cell phone that starts ringing during the Divine Liturgy?

Well, if he kept if on vibrate, he might be able to answer questions about liturgical emergencies when the priest needs a directive.
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« Reply #220 on: January 17, 2014, 10:55:30 PM »

This Nativity, I was the cantor for Christmas morning Liturgy. When I arrived, I soon realised I was the only chanter there. I kind of just looked helplessly at the priest, who was missing all his readers and only had one of his servers. He just sighed, blessed me to vest as an acolyte, and handed me the Lectionary and the extra cantor's book. I kind of had to keep (dignified, mind you) chanting while I walked instead of staying at the stand. Believe me, you have not lived until you've tried to hold sheet music  for  in one hand and a ripidion in another. And make a metania while trying to chant.
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« Reply #221 on: January 18, 2014, 03:53:44 PM »

This has to be terrible to be this shorthanded. I wouldn't blame you if any mistake happened, but kudos to you for surviving such an experience.
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« Reply #222 on: January 18, 2014, 06:32:28 PM »

This Nativity, I was the cantor for Christmas morning Liturgy. When I arrived, I soon realised I was the only chanter there. I kind of just looked helplessly at the priest, who was missing all his readers and only had one of his servers. He just sighed, blessed me to vest as an acolyte, and handed me the Lectionary and the extra cantor's book. I kind of had to keep (dignified, mind you) chanting while I walked instead of staying at the stand. Believe me, you have not lived until you've tried to hold sheet music  for  in one hand and a ripidion in another. And make a metania while trying to chant.
There is a reason why those in the choir don't make metanias. Our choir director has stated consistently that when you're in the choir, you focus on your singing and let those in the congregation make the metanias.
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« Reply #223 on: January 23, 2014, 02:33:18 PM »

Small thing, but quite funny
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SXRs7nDztI#t=19m18s


I just want to explain to those who are not familiar with this tradition nor Portuguese that the server is asking again "Who is the King of Glory" insted of just opening the door, so the bishop is saying instead of the answer "The Lord magnificent" in almost the same tone "Open the door".
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« Reply #224 on: January 23, 2014, 07:35:13 PM »

Beautiful video. Smiley
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