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Author Topic: who is the author of these prayers  (Read 312 times) Average Rating: 5
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Poppy
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« on: July 23, 2011, 12:48:57 PM »

Before breakfast

Quote
O Most Holy Trinity, have mercy on us! Lord, cleanse us from our sins! Master, pardon our transgressions! Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for Thy name's sake. Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

Lord, have mercy! (3 times)

O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for Thou art holy, always, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.



After Breakfast

Quote
More honorable than the Cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the Seraphim: without defilement you gave birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify you. Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

Lord, have mercy! (3 times)

God is with us, through His Grace and love for mankind, always now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.

Does anyone reconise these prayers and can tell me who wrote them?? Like which saint wrote them??

Cheers Poppy
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J.M.C
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2011, 05:59:02 PM »

Quote
Like which saint wrote them??

It's good to add this, otherwise you might get many glib answers saying: The Holy Spirit wrote these prayers. It's true, and worth remembering; however there is nothing wrong in knowing through which Saint these hymns were penned, if such information is known (a number of hymns are anonymous).


I think all Orthodox Christians would recognize these prayers, as they are part of the Daily Office, and are included in most Church services. In fact, I have just sung both these prayers at Vespers and will do again tomorrow at Divine Liturgy, God-willing.

Well, when I say "these prayers" I refer to the main part of them, not the entire quote.

Quote
O Most Holy Trinity, have mercy on us! Lord, cleanse us from our sins! Master, pardon our transgressions! Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for Thy name's sake.

...is one prayer.

Quote
Lord, have mercy! (3 times)

....is another, and....

Quote
O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for Thou art holy, always, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

....is a third. Obviously this last one relates to the prayer before breakfast, and is not used part of the Daily Office etc.

The prayer "O Most-Holy Trinity" is ascribed to Mark the Monk, from the 5th century. I think.

Quote
More honorable than the Cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the Seraphim: without defilement you gave birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify you.

Is ascribed to St Cosmas the Hymnographer (8th century). Later, two lines were added to the beginning of the prayer:

"It is truly right to bless thee, O Theotokos,
 ever blessed, and most pure, and the Mother of our God.."

These were revealed to a monk on Mt Athos by the Angel Gabriel. Because of this, the prayer is sometimes known as the Axion Estin in Greek or Dostóino yesť in Slavonic (both meaning "It is truly meet*...")

I am welcome to correction on the above.



*meet here being an old way of saying "fitting" or "right."


« Last Edit: July 23, 2011, 06:10:36 PM by J.M.C » Logged

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Poppy
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2011, 06:36:38 PM »

Quote
Like which saint wrote them??

It's good to add this, otherwise you might get many glib answers saying: The Holy Spirit wrote these prayers. It's true, and worth remembering; however there is nothing wrong in knowing through which Saint these hymns were penned, if such information is known (a number of hymns are anonymous).


I think all Orthodox Christians would recognize these prayers, as they are part of the Daily Office, and are included in most Church services. In fact, I have just sung both these prayers at Vespers and will do again tomorrow at Divine Liturgy, God-willing.

Well, when I say "these prayers" I refer to the main part of them, not the entire quote.

Quote
O Most Holy Trinity, have mercy on us! Lord, cleanse us from our sins! Master, pardon our transgressions! Holy One, visit and heal our infirmities for Thy name's sake.

...is one prayer.

Quote
Lord, have mercy! (3 times)

....is another, and....

Quote
O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for Thou art holy, always, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen.

....is a third. Obviously this last one relates to the prayer before breakfast, and is not used part of the Daily Office etc.

The prayer "O Most-Holy Trinity" is ascribed to Mark the Monk, from the 5th century. I think.

Quote
More honorable than the Cherubim, and more glorious beyond compare than the Seraphim: without defilement you gave birth to God the Word: true Theotokos, we magnify you.

Is ascribed to St Cosmas the Hymnographer (8th century). Later, two lines were added to the beginning of the prayer:

"It is truly right to bless thee, O Theotokos,
 ever blessed, and most pure, and the Mother of our God.."

These were revealed to a monk on Mt Athos by the Angel Gabriel. Because of this, the prayer is sometimes known as the Axion Estin in Greek or Dostóino yesť in Slavonic (both meaning "It is truly meet*...")

I am welcome to correction on the above.

*meet here being an old way of saying "fitting" or "right."


Thanks J.M.C.... i keep seeing random prayers and they don't have a author to them so i wondered who made them up.

What is "magnify" all about, i know it means make bigger but what for??
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J.M.C
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2011, 07:46:23 PM »


Magnify here is used in its original meaning of "to extol" or "esteem greatly"; it comes from the same root word (in Latin) as the word "magnificent". Only later did it come to mean "make something bigger [than it really is]". In Psalm 34 David writes "Oh, magnify the Lord with me...." - he does not mean make the Lord bigger than He really is (which is beyond our comprehension anyway), but to honour Him and praise Him.

Quote
i keep seeing random prayers and they don't have a author to them so i wondered who made them up.

I refer you to my "glib" answer above: people make things up all the time, but those prayers and hymns that make it into service books are not made up. They are recognized as being inspired, and the work of the Holy Spirit. Saints are not Saints because of their own works, but because of God's work through them. Cosmas the Hymnographer is given this title because this is the gift God gave Him, and though this gift is for our benefit and St Cosmas', the glory for it all goes to God.
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