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Author Topic: De processione Spiritus Sancti by Adam Zernikav of Chernigov  (Read 3844 times) Average Rating: 0
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cyro
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« on: July 23, 2011, 10:08:53 AM »

Has anyone read this book or know how to find it on the Internet?

Seems very interseting:

"In reading Khomiakov's On the western confessions of faith, I found an intriguing reference to a book by one Adam Zernikav. Khomiakov writes, "...I mention the fact that the work of Adam Zernikavius, in which it is demonstrated that all the testimony drawn from the works of the holy fathers in support of the addition to the Creed was intentionally altered or misquoted, still stands unrefuted."

Fr. Georges Florovsky seconds Khomiakov's assessment. He says, "Of a somewhat different mold than these Kievan scholars was Adam Zernikav of Chernigov. He deserves mention because of his special place in the ranks of religious leaders at that time in the south of Russia. Born in Konigsberg, and trained in Protestant schools, Zernikav came to Orthodoxy through scholarly study of the early Christian tradition. After a long period in the West, primarily in study at Oxford and London, he turned up in Chernigov. There he made his mark as the author of the treatise, De processione Spiritus Sancti, which after its belated publication in Leipzig in 1774-1776 by Samuil Mislavskii, Metropolitan of Kiev, gained him wide renown. It appears to have been Zernikav's only work, but it is the work of a lifetime. There is manifested in it an enormous erudition and a great gift for theological analysis. To this day Zernikav's work remains a skillful compilation of valuable materials, one of the most comprehensive studies on the subject ever made. It still deserves to be read."


When I tried to find this work by Interlibrary loan, I was unsuccessful. The librarian at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies in Toronto pointed me to the State Library of Vienna, which seems to be one of the few places to find the work.

Thanks to some help from a Lutheran friend, I have been able to secure a microfilm copy of the text. I wish to do a Latin/English edition of the text. It will probably take the rest of my life to accomplish it, since the work is hundreds of pages long, and I have only spare time. (Yes, I am selfish, and want to do the whole thing myself, rather than farming it out.)

In any case, the bill I must pay for the microfilm is about 253 Euros, or around 375 US dollars. I am making a shameless plea for anyone interested, if you're willing, to help defray the cost. (I also plan to sell my English edition of Luther's works--nearly complete--to help pay as well.) Any help, however small, would be greatly appreciated. (Even more important, remember me in your prayers.)

From what I gather so far, it appears that Zernikav was a Lutheran convert to Orthodoxy--at a time when such things were unheard of. That makes the text all the more intrinsically interesting to me. If the text lives up to Khomiakov's billing, it should prove very helpful in the ongoing discussion of the filioque."

http://frgregory.blogspot.com/2008/08/shameless-plea-for-money.html

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Jake
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2011, 11:59:00 AM »

Sounds like an interesting project.  Have you contacted the head of PIMS in Toronto to see if one of their profs or one of their retired Basilian priests could help you or even given you a grant. This is the type of projects that retired profs like.   I can't remember if PIMS is still publishing or not.
Can you elaborate on your plans: an edited edition do you mean with your comments?  or do you mean with an essay by you at the end or beginning?

Adam Zernikavius (1652-1692) was known also by the surname Ziornikobios in Greek.  He is of German origin and born in what at the time was Prussia.  Since he was German have you thought of contacting the University of Tubingen.  I think they have a special centre or Institute for the study of Eastern Orthodoxy and publish a journal.
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cyro
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2011, 02:43:20 PM »

Hello Jake.

Thanks for reply, but it is not my project.
I just past it here with the source, because it seemed interesting.
I heard about Zerniakav twice. Firstly when I was reading Khomiakov's letter to William Palmer. Secondly in Vladimir Moss writings.


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cyro
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2011, 02:44:36 PM »

Since he was German have you thought of contacting the University of Tubingen.  I think they have a special centre or Institute for the study of Eastern Orthodoxy and publish a journal.

I'll do that. Thanks. Smiley
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Jake
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2011, 06:47:56 PM »

Do you have an update for us?
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scamandrius
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 10:57:29 PM »

The coincidence of the time this thread started and recent events involving myself is quite startling.

Fr. Gregory and I have several mutual friends. We are both former Lutherans of the Missouri Synod. He was a pastor; I am not, but he and I , shall we say, meandered in the same "confessional" circle of Lutheranism.  For both of us, and for many more, Holy Orthodoxy was the only way to go.  We have shared several messages over the years but I've never spoken to him nor met him.   That changed three days ago.

We had been playing some phone tag, but we managed to catch each other and we talked for awhile and he asked me to help with this same work of Zernikav.  I admit that I have only a passing familiarity with the religious milieu of 18th century German Lutheranism from which Zernikav came so he updated me on that. I will have to do more research myself.  Anyway, Fr. Gregory asked me to do some translation for him on this work which is nothing short of monumental undertaking. The whole work is over 1300 pages.  I have been given about 20 from Tractatus VI which deals with the procession of the spirit.  Fr. Gregory knows my classical education and Latin/Greek credentials an d so he's asked me to do some translation work for him.

I haven't had a chance to really get into the work, but it will be a laborious effort.  The Latin reads like lecture notes (it's hardly profound) and its vocabulary is, as expected, quite heavy on theological terminology so I'll need to take some time making sure I fully understand the Latin theological terms as they were used in the 18th century.  Zernikav cites a lot of Greek Fathers but in Latin translation.  Fortunately, Zernikav gives a footnote of sorts as to where these citations can be found.  It is now a question whether I can track down those particular editions (which are bilingual and come from Paris in the mid 17th century). IF I can't, perhaps I can find them in the MPG and do comparisons that way.  Still, he's citing a new father every paragraph so I'm going to be checking references and comparing the original Greek in fathers like St. Justin Martyr, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Basil the Great, St. Epiphanius with the Latin that Zernikav cites.  Like I said, it will be laborious but I've done this sort of stuff before.

I'm hopeful to get over to Creighton University where I can use their MPG and start making some comparisons. I've begun only a rudimentary translation and it is defective because I'm not quite sure if Zernikav is using a Latin translation of Greek fathers' words consistently. 

Fr. Gregory believes that if Khomiakov and Fr. George Florovsky spoke of this work with high regard in their own theological tractates, then this work deserves attention even now.  The Procession of the Holy Spirit, though probably a topic that the majority of Roman Catholics, Lutherans and Episcopalians and Orthodox probably think is not a big deal, is still an important one that divides Eastern and Western Christendom and the truth should be proclaimed regardless of the source.

When I have made some preliminary finds and more flowing elegant translations, I will update you, if you wish.

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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2011, 11:13:57 PM »

Does it have any reference to the correspondence between Tubingen and EP Jeremiah on the topics?  I just referenced that the Lutherans, unlike most Protestants, have a defense of the filioque (it's still wrong, but at least they are just not sticking to what the Vatican adopted).
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« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2011, 11:19:04 PM »

^Isa, I haven't gotten that far yet.  I'm going to go out on a limb and doubt it.  My reasoning is as follows. Zernikav was part of the Callixtus school of Lutheranism in the 18th century.  Though heavily Patristic and claiming Melanchthon as their "spiritual father", they were still pietists and probably had little to nothing to do with the Tuebingen theologians, Jacob Andreae and Martin Crusius, who authored the correspondence with Patriarch JEREMIAS II since Andreae and Crusius were the second generation of great Lutheran thinkers who departed greatly from Chemnitz and Melanchthon.  Again, I'm going out a on a limb here and so this is mere guessing and speculation.  Once I have the time to actually really sit down with the text and with a little history of 18th century German Lutheranism, I'll be able to give you an answer, I hope.
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