Author Topic: Orthodox books  (Read 2335 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline smalltowngl

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 21
  • OC.net
    • My Family's Site
Orthodox books
« on: June 30, 2004, 01:19:04 PM »
If you had to suggest  a book that explains the Orhtodox religion to someone that knows nothing about it and is from a Protestant background, what book(s) would you recommend?

I want to do some reading on the faith, but none of the bookstores in my area carry books on the Orthodox religion.  The library doesn't have any either.  I'm going to have to order everything that I get, and that can get expensive, so I want to be selective in what I get.

Thanks for any help.

Offline Augustine

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 565
  • pray for me, please
    • Beyond Nihilism
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2004, 03:25:14 PM »
Orthodox Dogmatic Theology by Fr. Michael Pomazansky is the best single book on Orthodox teaching that I have come across, in terms of it's accuracy, comprehensiveness, and accessability (as well as it's affordability...about $20 USD.)  The link is for ordering it from the publisher, but I'm pretty sure you could order it from Amazon.com or through a major book chain.

Offline Andreas

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 162
  • OC.net
    • The Narrow Path Bookstore
"It's later than you think! Hasten therefore to do the work of God."
 -Fr. Seraphim (Rose)

Offline spiros

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 158
  • OC.net
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2004, 06:25:19 PM »
Also-
Some from a Prosestant background like Clark Carlton's books
Also Fr Peter Gilqusit <Becoming Orthodox>
Frank Schaeffer <Dancing Alone>
Frederica Mathewes Greene's books

I am a big fan of Kyriacos Markides <Mountain of Silence>, but not from a former protestant approach,as are the former titles

Before you go out and spend a fortune, check out used book services, and interlibrary loan
some Used book sites-
www.half.com
www.bookfinder.com
search ebay for books under the phrase orthodox, sometimes surprising bargains. Have fun! Finally, you can  order and buy books from monasteries as it helps them be self supporting
« Last Edit: June 30, 2004, 06:26:42 PM by spiros »
Official Resident of 5th Century Cyprus

Offline Doubting Thomas

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 887
  • Anglican (but not Episcopagan)
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2004, 06:32:12 PM »
As one from a Protestant background, I really like Clark Carlton's Faith series.  I also very much like Matthew Gallatin's Thirsting for God in a Land of Shallow Wells.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2004, 06:32:42 PM by Doubting Thomas »
"My Lord and My God!"--Doubting Thomas, AD 33

Offline spiros

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 158
  • OC.net
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2004, 12:32:45 PM »
I have not heard of <Thirsting of God in a land of Shallow wells> Any chance of a mini book report??
Official Resident of 5th Century Cyprus

Offline Doubting Thomas

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 887
  • Anglican (but not Episcopagan)
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2004, 02:06:40 PM »
I have not heard of <Thirsting of God in a land of Shallow wells> Any chance of a mini book report??

I'll try to give you one later this evening.
"My Lord and My God!"--Doubting Thomas, AD 33

Offline Doubting Thomas

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 887
  • Anglican (but not Episcopagan)
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2004, 08:28:22 PM »
I have not heard of <Thirsting of God in a land of Shallow wells> Any chance of a mini book report??

Spiros,
Here's my mini-book report:

The book is relatively short (183 pgs) and divided into three parts.  The first part chronicles the authors journey from Seventh-Day Adventism through Fundamentalism to charismatic Christianity.  He was actually a minister in a charismatic church for years until he became disatisfied it and with the logical inconsistencies of Protestantism in particular.  He then describes how Protestantism leads to relativism and is thus not correct.  He then considers Rome for awhile but doesn't agree with the ideas of papal supremacy and infalliblity.  He then discovers the Orthodox Church and feels like he is "home" because he has found the Truth.

The second part compares the Protestant rationalistic approach to Christianity to Orthodoxy's sacramental path.  He also discusses the Orthodox approach to the Scriptures versus how Protestants use them.  This middle part is thus sort of a transitional section.

The third part has chapters dealing with Protestant objections to certain Orthodox beliefs--baptism, Eucharist, formal prayer, liturgy, veneration of Mary and the saints--and does a good job defending each logically and biblically without being too technical.

The style is very readable.  He does a good job using everyday illustrations to demonstrate his points.  He effectively argues for the logic of Orthodoxy (he is a professor of philosophy) without being too abstract.  I also believe he effectively critiques Protestantism without being polemical.  (It's for these reasons that I have been trying to get my wife to read this book, even before the Clark Carlton's series.)
"My Lord and My God!"--Doubting Thomas, AD 33

Offline ExOrienteLux

  • Waning: Spoilers
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 183
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2004, 09:31:00 PM »
I've heard some really good things about Vladimir Lossky's The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church from some of my older 'dox friends, but I don't know how readable it is.  I do know, however, that Bishop Kallistos (Timothy) Ware's books are very readable and quite enlightening.  I also personally think that Fyodor Dostoevsky does a great job of showing how Orthodoxy is lived through his books, especially The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment , but that's just me.
Arise, O God! Judge the earth, for to Thee belong all the nations!

Offline Νεκτάριος

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 5,437
Re:Orthodox books
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2004, 09:51:11 PM »
Orthodox Spirituality by Metropolitan Heirotheos (Vlachos) of Nafpatkos is the absolute best introduction to Orthodoxy beyond the the externals "we believe X, Y, and Z" into the heart of what Orthodoxy is.  For a good look at the fundamentals of Orthodoxy (i.e we believe A, B and C because of D, E and F) the afore mentioned Orthodox Dogmatic Theology is excellent, but for a more scriptural approach (which many protestants find more to their liking IME) The Truth of our Faith  by Elder Cleopas of Romania is highly recomended.