Author Topic: Word of the day  (Read 41073 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline IoanC

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,468
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #225 on: April 25, 2014, 12:14:13 PM »
lu·cid·i·ty

noun
1.the quality of being easily understood, completely intelligible, or comprehensible: She makes her argument with pointed logic and exemplary lucidity.
2.the ability to see things clearly; rationality; sanity: In a rare moment of lucidity, the senator sided with his political enemies for the good of the country.

adj
lucid
1. readily understood; clear
2. shining or glowing (love this one)
3. psychiatry  of or relating to a period of normality between periods of insane or irresponsible behaviour


Offline biro

  • Site Supporter
  • Stratopedarches
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,566
  • Excelsior
    • Archive of Our Own works
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #226 on: April 25, 2014, 02:40:31 PM »
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/gussy

Definition of gussy in English:
gussy
Line breaks: gussy
Pronunciation: /ˈgʌsi
 
/
verb (gussies, gussying, gussied)
[with object] (gussy someone/thing up) North American • informal

    Make someone or something more attractive, especially in a showy or gimmicky way: shopkeepers gussied up their window displays
    More example sentences

Origin

1940s: perhaps from Gussie, pet form of the given name Augustus.
https://archiveofourown.org/users/Parakeetist


Warning: stories have mature content.

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #227 on: May 05, 2014, 02:48:39 PM »
promenade

a stroll or walk, especially in a public place, as for pleasure or display; an area used for such walking

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #228 on: May 06, 2014, 11:30:16 PM »
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #229 on: May 15, 2014, 10:36:05 PM »
"And the waters covered their enemies: there was not one of them left. Then believed they his words; they sang his praise. They soon forgat his works; they waited not for his counsel: But lusted exceedingly in the wilderness, and tempted God in the desert." - Ps. 106:11-14

forgat

verb; archaic
a simple past tense of forget


Offline Opus118

  • Site Supporter
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,592
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #230 on: May 15, 2014, 11:59:27 PM »
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.
If you cannot remember everything, instead of everything, I beg you, remember this without fail, that not to share our own wealth with the poor is theft from the poor and deprivation of their means of life; we do not possess our own wealth but theirs.  If we have this attitude, we will certainly offer our money; and by nourishing Christ in poverty here and laying up great profit hereafter, we will be able to attain the good things which are to come. - St. John Chrysostom

Offline TheTrisagion

  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 17,814
  • All good things come to an end
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #231 on: May 16, 2014, 12:06:44 AM »
Then I guess I will exute Asteriktos of his title as Grand Master Wordsmith.
God bless!

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #232 on: May 16, 2014, 12:07:27 AM »
Huh, interesting. :) Perhaps borrowed from the Latin and retaining something of that? Not sure, but for what it's worth it is listed in some online dictionaries; for example...

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exute

But regarding it being archaic, I read the KJV, so I come across such things every day  ;)  Having said that, the first time I heard the term was on a 90s tv sitcom, so it can't be completely unused.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2014, 12:08:38 AM by Asteriktos »

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #233 on: May 16, 2014, 12:12:18 AM »
My link seems to request a sign up for some reason, yet when I Google the word I can access the info. Here is what Merriam Webster had as the entry:

Quote
ex·ute transitive verb \igˈzüt\
 
Full Definition of EXUTE

archaic
:  strip <exuted of all his preferments — Robert Southey>
Origin of EXUTE

Latin exutus, past participle of exuere

Offline Opus118

  • Site Supporter
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,592
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #234 on: May 16, 2014, 01:05:15 AM »
Huh, interesting. :) Perhaps borrowed from the Latin and retaining something of that? Not sure, but for what it's worth it is listed in some online dictionaries; for example...

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exute

But regarding it being archaic, I read the KJV, so I come across such things every day  ;)  Having said that, the first time I heard the term was on a 90s tv sitcom, so it can't be completely unused.

This is precisely the problem. I dated a Miriam once and I am sure Merriam is no better. What went on I will not divulge, but I recommend keeping away from this dictionary.

And yes, I am going to plug the Ersatzian University Press dictionary because it is probably vetted by the Armenian Apostolic Church and therefore safe from (left blank in order to not get into a debate). Forewarned is Forearmed. Whatever that means.
If you cannot remember everything, instead of everything, I beg you, remember this without fail, that not to share our own wealth with the poor is theft from the poor and deprivation of their means of life; we do not possess our own wealth but theirs.  If we have this attitude, we will certainly offer our money; and by nourishing Christ in poverty here and laying up great profit hereafter, we will be able to attain the good things which are to come. - St. John Chrysostom

Offline DeniseDenise

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,751
  • This place holds to nothing....
  • Faith: Does it matter?
  • Jurisdiction: Unverifiable, so irrelevant
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #235 on: May 16, 2014, 01:18:07 AM »
bed·lam  [bed-luhm] 
noun
1.
a scene or state of wild uproar and confusion.
2.
Archaic. an insane asylum or madhouse.
Origin:
 a popular name for the Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem in London, which served as a lunatic asylum from circa 1400; compare Middle English Bedleem, Bethleem, Old English Betleem Bethlehem

Synonyms
1. disorder, tumult, chaos, clamor, turmoil, commotion, pandemonium.
All opinions expressed by myself are quite tragically my own, and not those of any other poster or wall hangings.

Offline IoanC

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,468
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #236 on: May 16, 2014, 02:20:17 PM »
luck

noun
1.
the force that seems to operate for good or ill in a person's life, as in shaping circumstances, events, or opportunities: With my luck I'll probably get pneumonia.
2.
good fortune; advantage or success, considered as the result of chance: He had no luck finding work.
3.
a combination of circumstances, events, etc., operating by chance to bring good or ill to a person: She's had nothing but bad luck all year.
4.
some object on which good fortune is supposed to depend: This rabbit's foot is my luck.

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #237 on: May 22, 2014, 01:34:49 AM »
adamantine

- utterly unyielding or firm in attitude or opinion
- too hard to cut, break, or pierce.
- like a diamond in luster

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #238 on: May 25, 2014, 05:17:58 PM »
Learnt a new word from the joint statement of Pope Francis and Pat. Bartholomew  8)

emarginate

notched at the margin; having a notched tip or edge

Offline Mor Ephrem

  • A highly skilled and trained Freudian feminist slut
  • Section Moderator
  • Hypatos
  • *****
  • Posts: 34,710
    • OrthodoxChristianity.net
  • Faith: Mercenary Freudianism
  • Jurisdiction: Texas Feminist Coptic
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #239 on: July 27, 2014, 07:08:45 PM »
dis·si·pa·tion
ˌdisəˈpāSHən
noun
noun: dissipation; plural noun: dissipations

1.  dissipated living.
"a descent into drunkenness and sexual dissipation"
synonyms:   debauchery, decadence, dissoluteness, dissolution, intemperance, excess, overconsumption, profligacy, self-indulgence, wildness;
antonyms:   asceticism

2.  squandering of money, energy, or resources.
"the dissipation of the country's mineral wealth"
synonyms:   squandering, frittering (away), waste, misspending;
antonyms:   preservation, accumulation

PHYSICS
loss of energy, especially by its conversion into heat.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense ‘complete disintegration’): from Latin dissipatio(n-), from the verb dissipare (see dissipate).

Offline biro

  • Site Supporter
  • Stratopedarches
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,566
  • Excelsior
    • Archive of Our Own works
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #240 on: July 27, 2014, 07:18:49 PM »
Premonition

A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/premonition
https://archiveofourown.org/users/Parakeetist


Warning: stories have mature content.

Offline Arachne

  • Trinary Unit || Resident Bossy Boots
  • Section Moderator
  • Merarches
  • *****
  • Posts: 10,375
  • November is short. Type fast.
  • Faith: Cradle Greek Orthodox. Cope.
  • Jurisdiction: Antiochian Archdiocese, UK
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #241 on: July 27, 2014, 07:21:44 PM »
Parisyllabic

(Linguistics) (of a noun or verb, in inflected languages) containing the same number of syllables in all or almost all inflected forms.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/parisyllabic
'Evil isn't the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as evil, maybe more so, and it's a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against stupid. That might actually make a difference.'~Harry Dresden

~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox ~



Offline Maria

  • Boldly Proclaiming True Orthodox Christianity
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 14,023
  • O most Holy Theotokos, save us.
    • Saint Euphrosynos Cafe Discussion Forum
  • Faith: TrueGenuine Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: GOC under Archbishop Stephanos
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #242 on: August 04, 2014, 05:10:58 PM »
bloviation - contributed by PtA
   
blo·vi·ate 
intr.v. blo·vi·at·ed, blo·vi·at·ing, blo·vi·ates Slang

To discourse at length in a pompous or boastful manner: "the rural Babbitt who bloviates about 'progress' and 'growth'" (George Rebeck).

[Mock-Latinate formation, from blow.]
blovi·ation n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bloviation
The memory of God should be treasured in our hearts like the precious pearl mentioned in the Holy Gospel. Our life's goal should be to nurture and contemplate God always within, and never let it depart, for this steadfastness will drive demons away from us. - Paraphrased from St. Philotheus of Sinai
Writings from the Philokalia: On Prayer of the Heart,
Translated from the Russian by E. Kadloubovksy and G.E.H. Palmer, Faber and Faber, London, Boston, 1992 printing.

Offline Opus118

  • Site Supporter
  • Protokentarchos
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,592
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #243 on: August 05, 2014, 11:20:40 AM »
Porpentine

A rodent harboring hollow spines.

Usage:

I am thy father's spirit,
Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,
And for the day confined to fast in fires,
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of my prison-house,
I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part
And each particular hair to stand on end,
Like quills upon the fretful porpentine:
But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood. List, list, O, list!
If thou didst ever thy dear father love--

If you cannot remember everything, instead of everything, I beg you, remember this without fail, that not to share our own wealth with the poor is theft from the poor and deprivation of their means of life; we do not possess our own wealth but theirs.  If we have this attitude, we will certainly offer our money; and by nourishing Christ in poverty here and laying up great profit hereafter, we will be able to attain the good things which are to come. - St. John Chrysostom

Offline Porter ODoran

  • St. John the Beloved, pray for me
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,135
  • Monahos.net: "Lawful Evil"; OC.net: "Chaotic Evil"
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: GOAA
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #244 on: August 05, 2014, 09:26:27 PM »
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.

So what you're saying is that it's an archaic, Latinate, or specialist word in the English language? ;)
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline orthonorm

  • BANNED for rules violations
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 17,715
  • Ad Aluminum!
  • Faith: DSM 5
  • Jurisdiction: Apostle to the Church of ASD
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #245 on: August 05, 2014, 09:41:50 PM »
Exute

(transitive verb) - to strip [a person] of; to divest or deprive of

I was going to post this, but I see I already beat myself to it. Still a fine word to bump for your learned edification.

Despite the claim. I do not think Exute is a word in the English language. It has a very useful, precise definition. Google Scholar cites 297 instances of use. Most in the English language are typos for Execute. Most of the remainder are in Latin or French. The few English language articles are about archaic terms that are no longer in use.

So what you're saying is that it's an archaic, Latinate, or specialist word in the English language? ;)

You paraphrasing Opus has got to be a ban-able offense. Letting the mods know now.

Offline IoanC

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,468
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #246 on: August 08, 2014, 05:31:38 AM »
pendulate - to swing as a pendulum

Offline Fabio Leite

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,790
    • Vida Ortodoxa
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #247 on: August 08, 2014, 09:51:50 AM »
English words that possibly come from Portuguese, directly or indirectly.

Quote
Albatross
an alteration of albatroz, under influence of the Latin word albus ("white")

Albino
from albino, with the same meaning, from Latin albus


Banana
from Portuguese or Spanish (more probably from Portuguese, as the most widespread Spanish word is plátano); from Portuguese, of African origin; akin to Wolof banäna banana

Baroque
from barroco (adj. = "unshapely")

Breeze
probably from Old Spanish and Portuguese briza 'northeastern wind

Buffalo
from Portuguese bufalo, from late Latin bufalus, from Greek boubalos 'antelope, wild ox'

Cachalot
from Portuguese cachalote (same meaning), probably via Spanish or French. The Portuguese word comes from cachola ("head" or "big head")

Caramel
from French, Spanish or Portuguese caramelo, 'caramel', from Late Latin calamellus

Caravel
from caravela

Cashew
from caju

Caste
from casta (="class")

Cobra
shortening of cobra-de-capelo, with the same meaning (literally, "snake with a hood")

Coconut
from coco + nut

Commando
from comando 'command'

Creole
French créole, from Castilian Spanish criollo, person native to a locality, from Portuguese crioulo, diminutive of cria, ("'person raised in one's house with no blood relation, a servant'"), < Portuguese criar ("'to rear, to raise, to bring up'"), from Latin creare, to beget; < Latin creo ("'to create'"), which came into English via French between 1595 and 1605. [same root as creature]

Dodo
According to Encarta Dictionary and Chambers Dictionary of Etymology, "dodo" comes from Portuguese doudo (currently, more often, doido) meaning "fool" or "crazy". The present Portuguese word dodô ("dodo") is of English origin. The Portuguese word doudo or doido may itself be a loanword from Old English (cp. English "dolt")

Embarrass
from Portuguese embaraçar (same meaning; also to tangle - string or rope), from em + baraço (archaic for "rope")

Emu
from ema (="rhea")

Fetish
from French fétiche, from Portuguese feitiço ("charm", "sorcery", "spell"), from Latin factitius or feticius ("artificial")

Flamingo
from Portuguese flamingo, from Spanish flamenco


Jackfruit
from Portuguese jaca, from Malayalam chakka + fruit

Jaguar
from Tupi or Guaraní jaguarete via Portuguese

Junk
from junco, from Javanese djong (Malay adjong).

Konpeitō
Japanese sweets, from the Portuguese confeito (sugar candy)

Labrador
from name of Portuguese explorer João Fernandes Lavrador, the surname meaning "landowner" or "farmer"

Lacquer
from French lacre, from Portuguese lacre, from Arabic lakk, from Persian lak

Lambada
from lambada (="beating, lashing")

Macaw
from macau; ultimately from Tupi macavuana.

Mandarin
from mandarim, from the Malay mantri, from Hindi मंत्री matri, from Sanskrit मन्त्रिन् mantrin (="counsellor")

Mango
from manga, via Malay mangga, ultimately from Malayalam മാങ്ങ māṅṅa or from Tamil மாங்காய் mānkāy

Mangrove
probably from Portuguese mangue mangrove (from Spanish mangle, probably from Taino) + English grove

Manioc
from mandioca (="cassava") from Tupi mandioca.

Marmalade
from marmelada, a preserve made from marmelo (="quince")

Molasses
from melaço (="treacle")

Monsoon
from monção

Mosquito
from Mosquito meaning 'little fly'

Mulatto
Portuguese mulato. From mula (=mule) a cross between a horse and a donkey or from the Arabic term muwallad, which means "a person of mixed ancestry"

Negro
Negro means "black" in Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian, being from the Latin word niger (Dative nigro, Accusative nigrum) and the Greek word Νέγρος Negros both of the same meaning. It came to English through the Portuguese and Spanish slave trade. Prior to the 1970s, it was the dominant term for Black people of African origin; in most English language contexts (except its inclusion in the names of some organizations founded when the term had currency, e.g. the United Negro College Fund), it is now considered either archaic or a slur in most contexts.

Pagoda
from pagode; corruption of Persian بوتکاتا butkata (+"idol deity")

Piranha
from piranha (=piranha), from Tupi pirá ("fish") + ánha ("cut")

potato
from "batata"

Samba
from samba ; ultimately of Angolan origin, semba

Sargasso
from sargaço (="sargasso")

Savvy
from "sabe" (he knows), from "saber" (to know)

Stevedore
from estivador (="stevedore")

Talapoin
from French, from Portuguese talapão

Tank
from tanque

Tapioca
from tapioca

Tempura
Japanese 天麩羅, tenpura?, also written as "天ぷら", from Portuguese têmporas, (=Ember Days)

Verandah
from varanda (="balcony" or "railing"), from Hindi वरांडा varanda or Bengali baranda

Yam
from inhame or Spanish ñame from West African nyama (="eat")

Zebra
from zebra (same meaning), which started as the feminine form of zebro (a kind of deer), from vulgar Latin eciferus, classical Latin EQUIFERVS.
Many Energies, 3 Persons, 2 Natures, 1 God, 1 Church, 1 Baptism, and 1 Cup. The Son begotten only from the Father, the Spirit proceeding only from the Father, Each glorifying the Other. The Son sends the Spirit, the Spirit Reveals the Son, the Father is seen in the Son. The Spirit spoke through the Prophets and Fathers and does so even today.

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #248 on: September 21, 2014, 09:39:55 PM »
Parkinson's Law

"Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion" (Wiki)

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #249 on: December 05, 2014, 10:41:05 PM »
trypophobia

fear of objects with clusters of, or an irregular pattern of, holes

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #250 on: December 07, 2014, 10:39:52 AM »
lawyer

a professional tasked with getting clients as much justice as they can afford

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #251 on: December 23, 2014, 12:35:08 PM »
alpha male

a term previously used by anthropologists when speaking of non-human primates; it is currently used as a self-identifier by belligerent human males who aspire to match the brutish strength and utter stupidity of non-human primates

Offline IoanC

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,468
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #252 on: December 23, 2014, 02:11:46 PM »
nothing happened.

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #253 on: February 27, 2015, 09:45:29 PM »
ad hockery

Definition - reliance on temporary solutions rather than on consistent, long-term plans

Origin - ad hockery is the noun form of ad hoc, an adverb meaning "for the special purpose or end presently under consideration," translating literally from Latin as "for this." It entered English in the late 1800s


Offline LenInSebastopol

  • Dimly Illumined
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 3,595
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #254 on: February 28, 2015, 11:18:14 AM »
Retromyngent: the ability to urinate while simultaneously walking backwards.

The above was a neologism used by a British explorer in the 19th century when reporting his observation of a specific tribal practice in Africa; fallen into disuse for some odd reason.
God is The Creator of All Free Beings

Offline Peacemaker

  • No Profile Edits
  • OC.net guru
  • *
  • Posts: 1,409
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #255 on: March 03, 2015, 04:04:15 PM »
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?




Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)
« Last Edit: March 03, 2015, 04:05:56 PM by Peacemaker »

Offline Mor Ephrem

  • A highly skilled and trained Freudian feminist slut
  • Section Moderator
  • Hypatos
  • *****
  • Posts: 34,710
    • OrthodoxChristianity.net
  • Faith: Mercenary Freudianism
  • Jurisdiction: Texas Feminist Coptic
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #256 on: March 03, 2015, 06:00:05 PM »
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?




Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course. 

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #257 on: March 03, 2015, 09:15:16 PM »
Then I guess I will exute Asteriktos of his title as Grand Master Wordsmith.

As well you should. I wasn't even posting the correct word. I heard 'exute,' when apparently the right word was 'exeunt,' which is defined as "a stage direction in a printed play to indicate that a group of characters leave the stage." Oh. Yeah. That makes more sense in the context that I heard it in.  :-[  :D

Offline Peacemaker

  • No Profile Edits
  • OC.net guru
  • *
  • Posts: 1,409
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #258 on: March 03, 2015, 09:29:49 PM »
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?






Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course.

HAHA not me, that was already written by someone else on my-weird-words.tumblr.com

Offline hecma925

  • Non-clairvoyant, but you can call me Elder
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 16,317
  • Unbreakable! He's alive, dammit! It's a MIRACLE!
  • Faith: Truthful Chalcedonian Truther
  • Jurisdiction: In Hell I'll be in good company
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #259 on: March 03, 2015, 10:04:28 PM »
Laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy

(lap”ər-ō-hĭs”tər-ō-sal-pĭng”gō-ō”ə-fôr-ek’tə-mē) n. Surgical removal of the female reproductive organs.

Example: Why should I a laparohysterosalpingooophorectomy when it’s so much easier to just cut off your balls?






Edit: I hope I don't get in trouble for this one.  ::)

I don't know about trouble, that's up to the moderator of this section.  But certainly you need to take a basic biology course.

HAHA not me, that was already written by someone else on my-weird-words.tumblr.com

That person needs a lesson in grammar.
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

Once Christ has filled the Cross, it can never be empty again.

"But God doesn't need your cookies!  Arrive on time!"

Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 10,436
  • Trolling Babylon 24/7, without apology!
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
  • Faith: Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #260 on: March 03, 2015, 11:44:31 PM »
Cockalorum: "A little man with an exaggerated idea of his own importance."

One of my favorite words.  :)


Selam
"Whether it’s the guillotine, the hangman’s noose, or reciprocal endeavors of militaristic horror, radical evil will never be recompensed with radical punishment. The only answer, the only remedy, and the only truly effective response to radical evil is radical love."
+ Gebre Menfes Kidus +
http://bookstore.authorhouse.com/Products/SKU-000984270/Rebel-Song.aspx

Offline LenInSebastopol

  • Dimly Illumined
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 3,595
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #261 on: March 04, 2015, 10:16:21 AM »
Still LOL
God is The Creator of All Free Beings

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #262 on: March 11, 2015, 04:34:01 PM »
momism

excessive adulation of the mother and undue dependence on maternal care or protection, resulting in absence or loss of maturity and independence
 
 
--dictionary.com

Offline LenInSebastopol

  • Dimly Illumined
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 3,595
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #263 on: March 11, 2015, 07:37:09 PM »
momism

excessive adulation of the mother and undue dependence on maternal care or protection, resulting in absence or loss of maturity and independence
--dictionary.com

First used by the author Philip Gordon Wylie in the 1942 book Generation of Vipers, which I urge all to read it....very interesting author too. Probably not at your local library.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Wylie
God is The Creator of All Free Beings

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #264 on: March 15, 2015, 04:34:20 PM »
knackered

(British Slang) -- exhausted, very tired

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #265 on: March 28, 2015, 01:59:24 PM »
Today's word of the day from (the email I get every day from) dictionary.com is:
 
pepper-upper

1. Informal. something, as a food, beverage, or pill, that provides a quick but temporary period of energy and alertness.
2. Informal. something added to food to relieve blandness.



Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #266 on: April 04, 2015, 12:43:05 PM »
oology

the branch of ornithology that studies birds' eggs

Offline hecma925

  • Non-clairvoyant, but you can call me Elder
  • Hoplitarches
  • *************
  • Posts: 16,317
  • Unbreakable! He's alive, dammit! It's a MIRACLE!
  • Faith: Truthful Chalcedonian Truther
  • Jurisdiction: In Hell I'll be in good company
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #267 on: April 04, 2015, 04:50:54 PM »
incisive

adjective   \in-SYE-siv\

impressively direct and decisive (as in manner or presentation)
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

Once Christ has filled the Cross, it can never be empty again.

"But God doesn't need your cookies!  Arrive on time!"

Offline Asteriktos

  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,012
  • It's raw!
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #268 on: April 09, 2015, 02:01:23 PM »
brume

mist; fog

(dictionary.com word of the day)

Offline byhisgrace

  • AOCB
  • Site Supporter
  • OC.net guru
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,265
  • Memory Eternal to my Younger Brother
  • Faith: Orthodox
  • Jurisdiction: GOARCH
Re: Word of the day
« Reply #269 on: April 14, 2015, 01:26:30 AM »
*deleted*
« Last Edit: April 14, 2015, 01:28:03 AM by byhisgrace »
Oh Holy Apostle, St. John, pray for us