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Author Topic: Many years to you, Master!  (Read 1678 times) Average Rating: 0
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mike
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« on: July 19, 2011, 11:06:41 AM »

Why in the Church Slavonic Liturgy it's not translated from Greek. Is it left because the first Ruthenian Bishops were Greeks?

Is it the same in other languages?
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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2011, 11:14:22 AM »

The OCA still says that part in Greek, even when the service is in English, (or Slavonic) . It is a tradition that is kept.
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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2011, 02:04:21 PM »

The Carpatho-Rusyn Orthodox in ACROD use Eis polla eti Despota, but the Ruthenian Greek Catholics have translated it as Many Years, O Master.

I never heard 'Na Mnohaja Lita, Vladyko' in the Slavonic during a Hierarchichal Liturgy although it was inserted in the regular Liturgy prior to the hymn, "We Have Seen the True light" (Vid'ichom Svit Istinnyj) following the communion. This was not carried over into the Engligh translations we use.

I have been told that prior to the schism within the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church, the "eis polla' was used but replaced by the Slavonic after ACROD was established. Perhaps that was a reaction to Constantinople receiving Father Chornock and his flock and consecrating him as a Bishop?
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2011, 03:18:51 PM »

Why in the Church Slavonic Liturgy it's not translated from Greek. Is it left because the first Ruthenian Bishops were Greeks?

Is it the same in other languages?
For our bishop we say it in Slavonic, but when I visit the local ROCOR monastery, they say it in Greek.

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Andrew
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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2011, 04:06:37 PM »

Why in the Church Slavonic Liturgy it's not translated from Greek. Is it left because the first Ruthenian Bishops were Greeks?

Is it the same in other languages?
For our bishop we say it in Slavonic, but when I visit the local ROCOR monastery, they say it in Greek.

In Christ,
Andrew

I would love to hear from our Serbian and Romanian brethren, but I suspect the reason Bulgarians do not use the Greek lies in the long struggle against Greek clergy, language and culture that had been imposed upon them.
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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 11:33:50 AM »

Coincidentally enough, I came across this video from the Greek Catholics of Muchachevo this morning from a liturgy this past Sunday. http://www.youtube.com/user/logostvuzhgorod#p/f/0/rg99akaxLQw The choir alternates between the Eis Polla and Mnohaja lita Vladyko.  Many old timers from the OCA and those from ACROD will find much which is familiar with Bishop Milan's style and the chant.
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« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2011, 12:15:01 PM »

Is it the same in other languages?

That's the practice here in Finland. I've never heard it in Finnish.
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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2011, 02:23:30 PM »

I've only been to hierarchical services in Antiochian parishes, and they use both Greek (during litanies and the dismissal) and English ("Many years to thee, O Master" during the Trisagion).
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 02:24:18 PM by bogdan » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2011, 08:26:36 PM »

In Churches which chant the "eis polla eti" in Greek, does the bishop also intone the "Lord, Lord, look down from heaven" in Greek?
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« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2011, 08:47:29 PM »

In Churches which chant the "eis polla eti" in Greek, does the bishop also intone the "Lord, Lord, look down from heaven" in Greek?

Yes, he does. And in churches in the English-speaking world which use a liturgical language other than English or Greek, a bishop will often use Greek, English and the prevailing liturgical language in his threefold chanting of Lord, Lord.
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podkarpatska
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« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2011, 10:00:38 PM »

In Churches which chant the "eis polla eti" in Greek, does the bishop also intone the "Lord, Lord, look down from heaven" in Greek?

Yes, he does. And in churches in the English-speaking world which use a liturgical language other than English or Greek, a bishop will often use Greek, English and the prevailing liturgical language in his threefold chanting of Lord, Lord.

Not necessarily. Over my life which has included four Bishops from ACROD plus any number of liturgies with Bishops from the Metropolia/OCA and the UOCUSA, I never heard the Bishop intone or bless in Greek. In all three jurisdictions Bishops have intoned either Slavonic - 'Hospodi, Hospodi...' or 'Lord, Lord...'  The only time that we would have heard Greek was when a Bishop would intone the third repetition of the Thrice holy hymn...'Hagios atheos'..... (It may be that OCA bishops in other parts of the country have differing practice, but going back to the late Metropolitan Leonty and other northeastern OCA Bishops, I never heard it done in Greek.)
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2011, 05:16:30 PM »

I've heard Romanian Orthodox belonging to the OCA sing "Many Years" to visiting hierarchs in both Romanian and English, but never Greek.
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« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2011, 10:23:17 AM »

So, to answer the OP...like most things that are not doctrine, the Orthodox answer is...pause...well...it depends. I'm OK with that.
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« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2013, 04:05:03 PM »

Why is Eis Polla Eti Despota sung at a Bishop's funeral when he is vested? This is a wish for the bishop to live long, but what is the point of that when the Bishop has gone on to the next life.
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« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2013, 04:17:50 PM »

I've heard Romanian Orthodox belonging to the OCA sing "Many Years" to visiting hierarchs in both Romanian and English, but never Greek.

Yes, we greet our hierarchs in Romanian: "Pe Stăpânul și Arhiereul nostru, Doamne, îl păzește întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani, Stăpâne!"   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BACSl9Uraw

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« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2013, 04:46:04 PM »

Why is Eis Polla Eti Despota sung at a Bishop's funeral when he is vested? This is a wish for the bishop to live long, but what is the point of that when the Bishop has gone on to the next life.

Because that's what bishops are usually greeted with. It's quite an emotional way of saying good-bye, as well as a powerful statement of faith, proclaiming that death is no big deal for Christians: "May the Lord remember thy priesthood in His Kingdom."
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« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2013, 06:25:08 PM »

Why is Eis Polla Eti Despota sung at a Bishop's funeral when he is vested? This is a wish for the bishop to live long, but what is the point of that when the Bishop has gone on to the next life.

Been to several funerals of Bishop and have never heard this, lots of memory eternals instead. Traditionally the funeral is the only service where you do not intone Eis Polla Eti Dhespota to the presiding bishop at the final blessing.
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Joseph
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« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2013, 08:32:22 PM »

In Churches which chant the "eis polla eti" in Greek, does the bishop also intone the "Lord, Lord, look down from heaven" in Greek?

In the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America which is bilingual liturgically, "Kyrie, Kyrie," is typically intoned in both Greek and English, but "Eis Polla Eti, Despota," is chanted in Greek only.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2013, 08:32:48 PM by Basil 320 » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2013, 08:38:48 PM »

Why in the Church Slavonic Liturgy it's not translated from Greek. Is it left because the first Ruthenian Bishops were Greeks?

Is it the same in other languages?

The Church of Russia's maintenance of "Eis Polla Eti, Despota," in Greek, is a loving remnant from the early first 500 years of its development, when its bishops were Greeks sent from Constantinople; while services were in Church Slavonic, the people greeted their bishop in his native Greek, "Eis Polla Eti, Despota."
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« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2013, 08:20:21 AM »

For the same reason, the Church of Russia also maintains the episcopal exclamation in Greek, "Ton Despotin, ke Archeirea imon, Kyrie philate, Eis Polla Eti."  "The Master, and our Archierarch, Lord protect him, for Many Years."
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mike
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« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2013, 05:48:41 PM »

I've heard Romanian Orthodox belonging to the OCA sing "Many Years" to visiting hierarchs in both Romanian and English, but never Greek.

Yes, we greet our hierarchs in Romanian: "Pe Stăpânul și Arhiereul nostru, Doamne, îl păzește întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani, Stăpâne!"   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BACSl9Uraw



Cool you do it in Romanian. But that particular performance was awful.
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« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2013, 05:50:02 PM »

I've heard Romanian Orthodox belonging to the OCA sing "Many Years" to visiting hierarchs in both Romanian and English, but never Greek.

Yes, we greet our hierarchs in Romanian: "Pe Stăpânul și Arhiereul nostru, Doamne, îl păzește întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani! Întru mulți ani, Stăpâne!"   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BACSl9Uraw



Cool you do it in Romanian. But that particular performance was awful.

I agree - I just couldn't find any other youtube illustration.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2013, 05:55:59 PM by Romaios » Logged
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« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2013, 05:55:59 PM »

Shout out to Our Lady of Fatima...  Wink
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« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2013, 06:32:51 PM »

here with the orthodox pope of rome tm:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YwLetZUlx4
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« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2013, 06:42:15 PM »

here with the orthodox pope of rome tm:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YwLetZUlx4

Now that's heavy-byzantine!  laugh

The choral setting is actually the most commonly heard version, but those girls were over-doing it a little.
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