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Author Topic: Have a favorite hymn/chant?  (Read 3833 times) Average Rating: 0
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Heorhij
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« Reply #45 on: August 18, 2011, 11:56:13 PM »

"Aksion Estin" sung by Divna Ljubojevich.

As one Ukrinian Orthodox priest, a good friend of mine, characterized it: "Beautiful. Passionless. Wonderful."
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« Reply #46 on: August 19, 2011, 12:21:09 AM »

The Te Deum Laudamus

We praise Thee O God, we acknowledge Thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship Thee, the Father Everlasting.
To Thee all the angels cry aloud, the heavens and all the powers therein;
To Thee cherubim and seraphim continually do cry;
Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth;
Heaven and earth are full of the majesty of Thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles praise Thee
The goodly fellowship of the prophets praise Thee;
The noble army of martyrs praise Thee;
The holy Church though all the world doth acknowledge Thee;
The Father of an infinite majesty; Thine adorable true and only Son,
Also the Holy Ghost, the Comforter.
Thou art the King of Glory, O Christ.
Thou are the everlasting Son of the Father.
When Thou tookest upon Thee to deleiver man;
Thou didst humble Thyself to be born of a virgin.
When Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death,
Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God
In the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come
To be our judge.
We therefore pray Thee to help Thy servants,
Whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy precious blood.
Make them to be numbered with Thy saints
In glory everlasting.
O Lord, save Thy people and bless Thine heritage.
Govern them and lift them up forever.
Day by day we magnify Thee,
And we worship Thy name ever, world without end.
Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin,
O Lord have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us,
O Lord, let Thy mercy be upon us, as our trust is in Thee.
O Lord, in Thee have I trusted; let me never be confounded.
Possibly the one thing I miss from being Anglican is having this in my prayerbook.
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« Reply #47 on: August 19, 2011, 12:33:43 AM »

The Te Deum Laudamus

We praise Thee O God, we acknowledge Thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship Thee, the Father Everlasting.
To Thee all the angels cry aloud, the heavens and all the powers therein;
To Thee cherubim and seraphim continually do cry;
Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth;
Heaven and earth are full of the majesty of Thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles praise Thee
The goodly fellowship of the prophets praise Thee;
The noble army of martyrs praise Thee;
The holy Church though all the world doth acknowledge Thee;
The Father of an infinite majesty; Thine adorable true and only Son,
Also the Holy Ghost, the Comforter.
Thou art the King of Glory, O Christ.
Thou are the everlasting Son of the Father.
When Thou tookest upon Thee to deleiver man;
Thou didst humble Thyself to be born of a virgin.
When Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death,
Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God
In the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come
To be our judge.
We therefore pray Thee to help Thy servants,
Whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy precious blood.
Make them to be numbered with Thy saints
In glory everlasting.
O Lord, save Thy people and bless Thine heritage.
Govern them and lift them up forever.
Day by day we magnify Thee,
And we worship Thy name ever, world without end.
Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin,
O Lord have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us,
O Lord, let Thy mercy be upon us, as our trust is in Thee.
O Lord, in Thee have I trusted; let me never be confounded.
Possibly the one thing I miss from being Anglican is having this in my prayerbook.

The Orthodox equivalent is the Great Doxology, sung at the end of Matins.  Smiley
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« Reply #48 on: August 19, 2011, 12:54:16 AM »

"Aksion Estin" sung by Divna Ljubojevich.

As one Ukrinian Orthodox priest, a good friend of mine, characterized it: "Beautiful. Passionless. Wonderful."

Thank you Heorhij
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR3Y5hDncn4

As beautiful as Divna's voice is, it is your voice here, once again, that I longed for. (And before you try to find context for this thought, it is  entirely from your posts, we have never crossed paths in threads.)

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« Reply #49 on: August 19, 2011, 01:25:37 AM »

As for as Orthodox/Eastern Catholic chants go, I love the Cherubic hymn and I try to find as many arrangements of it as I can. Cheesy
The Holy Friday Lamentations are extremely beautiful too, particularly the Greek melody, with extremely deep words. The first Byzantine chant I ever heard was Agni Parthene (under the moniker Feciora curata because it was a Romanian choir), and I'm pretty sure I teared up over it. Tongue
On the Roman end:
Te Deum, solemn tone.
Salve Regina, solemn tone.
Missa Orbis Factor
Le messe de nostre dame by Machaut
Holy God We Praise Thy Name
Ave Maris Stella
Crux Fidelis
In Paradisum
Dies Irae
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Let us who mystically represent the cherubim and sing the thrice-holy hymn unto the life-giving Trinity now lay aside all earthly care. Amen. That we may receive the King of All escorted invisibly by angelic hosts. Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.
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« Reply #50 on: August 19, 2011, 06:40:29 AM »

"Aksion Estin" sung by Divna Ljubojevich.

As one Ukrinian Orthodox priest, a good friend of mine, characterized it: "Beautiful. Passionless. Wonderful."

I have one of Divna's albums. Really good.  angel
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« Reply #51 on: August 19, 2011, 06:59:32 AM »

"Simeron Kremate" -  I had only ever heard it as a recording before, from a service in a Colorado parish- which was powerful enough. Live, it reduced me to tears.

I have a recording of Simeron Kremate sung by Spyridon Peristeris, first chanter of the Athens Cathedral in (IIRC) the 1950s-'60s, which will make your hair stand on end for all the right reasons. PM me if you're interested.
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« Reply #52 on: August 19, 2011, 08:57:16 AM »

"Aksion Estin" sung by Divna Ljubojevich.

As one Ukrinian Orthodox priest, a good friend of mine, characterized it: "Beautiful. Passionless. Wonderful."

Passionless?  Her singing of that hymn drives me to tears.  She has an incredible voice.
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« Reply #53 on: August 19, 2011, 08:59:42 AM »


The Orthodox equivalent is the Great Doxology, sung at the end of Matins.  Smiley

This is sung at the end of the Thanksgiving Moleben in the Orthodox Church, although most translations that I have seen also allow the option of singing the Great Doxology in its place. 
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« Reply #54 on: August 19, 2011, 09:30:55 AM »

As for as Orthodox/Eastern Catholic chants go, I love the Cherubic hymn and I try to find as many arrangements of it as I can. Cheesy
The Holy Friday Lamentations are extremely beautiful too, particularly the Greek melody, with extremely deep words. The first Byzantine chant I ever heard was Agni Parthene (under the moniker Feciora curata because it was a Romanian choir), and I'm pretty sure I teared up over it. Tongue
On the Roman end:
Te Deum, solemn tone.
Salve Regina, solemn tone.
Missa Orbis Factor
Le messe de nostre dame by Machaut
Holy God We Praise Thy Name
Ave Maris Stella
Crux Fidelis
In Paradisum
Dies Irae

In spite of my Theological differences with the Latins, I believe that they have either given us, or inspired some of the most beautiful music dedicated to the worship of God.  In addition to the Te Deum, the Ave Maris Stella list above is beautiful, particularly as arranged by Claudio Monteverdi in his Vespers.  However, it is my opinion that the peak of music dedicated to God are the two Sacrea Symphoniae written by Giovani Gabrieli in the turn of the 17th Century.  The last of his hymns, lost after his death and which he probably never heard performed, is one of my favorite.  It is the Sonata con voce: Dulcis Jesu a 20.  It was only discovered about 60 years ago in a castle in Germany, preserved there, it is believed, by one of his students.  His music influenced the later great German composers, Roman Catholic and Lutheran, all the way up to Bach.  Yet, in his home, Venice, he was quickly forgotten, his music overshadowed by the operatic excesses of those that followed him, including Monteverdi.  I don’t believe that Gabrieli was simply a man.  I believe, like his last name, he was an angel.  I don’t know of any man who could have written what he did.

Of the later composers, the German Michael Preatorius is probably my favorite.  He was a very prolific German (Lutheran) composer who is best known for his arrangement of French dance tunes (the Terpsichore), and the writing of his work the Syntagma Musicum; required reading for anyone trying to understand the music of that period.  However, he also wrote over 1200 church hymns and arrangements, many in use by Lutherans and other Protestants to this day.  Some have had to be toned down due to the passions raised by the Reformation, and later the 30 years war that devastated so much of Europe, but the music remains beautiful to this day.  Like me in my younger days, Preatorius was a militantly Lutheran Christian that regretted not becoming a monk or a priest.  This presented an interesting dichotomy given the rejection of holy orders by the Lutherans, and this tension and dichotomy are often sensed in his music.
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« Reply #55 on: August 19, 2011, 10:00:48 AM »

"Simeron Kremate" -  I had only ever heard it as a recording before, from a service in a Colorado parish- which was powerful enough. Live, it reduced me to tears.

There's an amazing recording on Youtube of the late Archbishop Job singing it. In the Greek tradition the priest carries the cross in procession druring this hymn, and at the end he nails the icon of Christ to it. It is an unbelievably moving moment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QD71bV9omM
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 10:03:46 AM by bogdan » Logged
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« Reply #56 on: August 21, 2011, 11:42:26 PM »

I have a bit of a fascination with the stichera from Holy Monday, Erxomenos o Kyrios.

First there is the words, which speak for themselves:

Quote
As the Lord went to His voluntary Passion, He said to His apostles on the way: “Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man shall be betrayed, as it is is written of Him.” Come, then, and let us also journey with Him, purified in mind’ let us be crucified with Him and die for His sake to the pleasures of this life, that we may also live with Him and hear Him say: “No longer do I ascend to the earthly Jerusalem to suffer, but I ascend to My Father and your Father, and to My God and your God; and I shall raise you up to the Jerusalem on high in the Kingdom of heaven.”

And the melody is one of the most beautiful Greek chant melodies I've ever heard. Unfortunately it goes a bit too high for me to chant, but luckily the Russians write liturgical music for basso profundo so I'll find something in my range eventually. Cheesy
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Let us who mystically represent the cherubim and sing the thrice-holy hymn unto the life-giving Trinity now lay aside all earthly care. Amen. That we may receive the King of All escorted invisibly by angelic hosts. Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.
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« Reply #57 on: September 20, 2011, 07:06:18 PM »

I really like Phos Hilaron.
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« Reply #58 on: September 20, 2011, 07:24:58 PM »

Yes, my favorite is the Fr. Sergei Glagolev (OCA priest, retired, now in his 80s, I believe) setting of the Cherubic Hymn. My parish choir sings it (I'm in choir) - the music indicates it was written in 1996 and is based on Znamenny chant themes. I love Znamenny chant, which might be part of the reason I love this.

This link gives you a snippet of the beginning:

http://www.spiritoforthodoxy.com/mp3/soocd1-05.mp3
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« Reply #59 on: September 24, 2011, 08:44:43 AM »

I do but first let me tell you it's not a hymn but done in chant style. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4BX_sNuHns&feature=related
also this will let you know what my pic is all about as well  Tongue
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