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Author Topic: Exodus 9:12  (Read 416 times) Average Rating: 0
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GTAsoldier
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GTAsoldier
« on: July 07, 2011, 01:22:08 PM »

Greetings everyone,

I'm currently reading the book of Exodus in a sample of the Orthodox Study Bible (on my PC Kindle). I was reading through all the events in which the Lord, through Moses and Aaron, plagued Egypt because the Pharaoh did not want to release the Hebrew slaves. Each time a plague stuck, the Pharaoh hardened his heart and did not heed to the Lord's warnings. But then after the Plague of Boils, this caught my eye:

"But the Lord hardened Pharaoh's heart; and he did not heed them, as the Lord said to Moses." (Exodus 9:12)

The Orthodox Christians I came across on the Christian forums mentioned that the Old Testament in the OSB is a decent (but not perfect) translation of the Septuagint (LXX), which I know alot of Orthodox Christians use. Is that line in Exodus 9:12 a mistranslation or slight error in this version? I do not want to knock off the entire OSB OT just for this, but can you guys assist me here?  Huh

In Christ,

GTA

P.S. I'm also aware that the OT for the East Orthodox Bible is still under development, and it seeks to be a picture-perfect translation of the LXX. It's projected to be released with the EOB New Testament in 2012. The EOB NT by itself is available now. I'm hoping that this remedies the issues here. Smiley

P.P.S. I'm noticing the same thing in Exodus 20:1, 20:20, 20:27, 11:10, & 12:8 in my OSB. I'm even more confused. Lord help me.  Huh Undecided
« Last Edit: July 07, 2011, 01:34:33 PM by GTAsoldier » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2011, 01:39:47 PM »

Looks correct to me.

Quote
12 And the Lord hardened Pharao's heart, and he hearkened not unto them, as the Lord had spoken to Moses.

12 Induravitque Dominus cor Pharaonis, et non audivit eos, sicut locutus est Dominus ad Moysen.

12 ἐσκλήρυνεν δὲ κύριος τὴν καρδίαν Φαραω καὶ οὐκ εἰσήκουσεν αὐτῶν καθὰ συνέταξεν κύριος
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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2011, 02:33:34 PM »

This is where the god of Plato and the God of Israel depart and problems begin for those who want to fashion the latter into the former.

I love the apologies that surround these passages. I hope half the energy is put into explaining this as was in the "why it is OK to avoid certain people" thread.

Is this the first time you have read Exodus? Or much of the Scripture, because such language is used throughout. Not being condescending, just curious.

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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2011, 02:46:16 PM »

FWIW, don't get too caught up in the whole Septuagint business. It is an over-blown topic (click on the Septuagint tag below to read on the many threads about it). Grab a decent version in English translation with the "Apocrypha":

I like this for light "study":

http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-Apocrypha-Standard-Expanded-Hardcover/dp/0195283481/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1310063771&sr=1-1

And this for an easy on the eyes reading (no Apocrypha):

http://www.amazon.com/KJV-Single-Column-Bible-Thomas-Nelson/dp/1418543101/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1310063880&sr=1-1

Its another version that is different enough to get you thinking about bit about what might lie underneath a certain passage. Reads well. Single paragraphed. The cover is rubber-like so you can toss in your bag and it holds up pretty well. Also can't beat the price.

FWIW.

Being a neurotic perfectionist, I just remind myself that if I ain't really up on the Sermon of the Mount which is pretty clear in any version, then I shouldn't hand-wring a lot over the rest.

FWIW, at least one Bishop according to someone on this board, suggests exactly this combo and for the same reasons I wrote. And nearly every Orthodox Priest I've spoken with uses the Oxford edition in the RSV for their go to version in English.

Frankly, I think the NKJV gets a bad rap in many circles, especially Orthodox. It sometimes reads quite nicely and there are more than a few Psalms that I think are rendered much better in the NKJV than in the RSV.

OK, neurosis must come to an end.
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GTAsoldier
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GTAsoldier
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2011, 03:44:28 PM »

Is this the first time you have read Exodus? Or much of the Scripture, because such language is used throughout. Not being condescending, just curious.

For the most part, yeah. I haven't read scripture in it's fullness (from start to finish) to be brutally honest with you. I finished reading the entire book of Genesis within the past few days in part of my goal to read the entire bible 10 chapters a day. I figured that I needed a firm foundation on what I really believe in before I make my decision to become an Orthodox Christian. Prior to this, I've been reading some writings from the church fathers, saints (east and west, pre- and post-1054 schism), to help strengthen my spiritual muscles, but not an anyone's expense. But then I realized that I needed to return to the underlying source of my faith (the Bible) in order to get a good understanding of what I'm reading off these people.

 I felt like, for the past 3 years, I needed to deepen my search for God's Truth. All my life (raised Roman Catholic) I was told to "just believe" and that's it. The path to God is much deeper that just mere belief, there has to be action involved in it too. I needed to understand why I believe in what I believe in. I pray that God guides me along the way. Much of my faith and worship in the past has been external and that needed to change. In addition to that, I'm very dissatisfied with how the Roman Catholic Church has handled things since Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI and I'm appalled at the status and bad reputation of Christianity in my country (America) because of those representing it. All of these made mr reconsider alot o of stuff in my faith, y'know? The road has already been rough for me. It's one of the reasons why I registered to this forum in the first place. So far, I'm finding alot more truth in Orthodoxy than any other sect (pardon) of Christianity. And I'm grateful for that.

Lord have mercy on me.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2011, 03:50:45 PM by GTAsoldier » Logged

God be merciful to us sinners.

Quote from: IoanC
the best way of conveying God's love to people is through your own presence and deeds.
No longer posting on this forum. Thanks to all the helpful people who inspired me. God bless.
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2011, 04:03:01 PM »

With a Grain of Salt:

I think reading the Scriptures from beginning to end, so to speak, isn't the best idea.

I follow a rule that is not unlike many other folks.

Each day:

A chapter from one of the Gospels (I would go from Mark, Matthew, Luke, John). Once you get through them. Repeat.
A chapter from one of the Epistles. Once finished, then Acts, the Apocalypse. Then repeat.
A couple to a handful of Psalms each day. Repeat when finished.
A chapter from an OT book.

The OT though is something where I think guidance is needed, but starting in Genesis is great as is moving to Exodus, then Deuteronomy.

After that, I would move to Isaiah and then the other Prophets. (Along the way I would read a verse or two from Proverbs in my daily reading.)

After that I would probably repeat that sequence again. Then take up what ever strikes your fancy OTwise.

That is my opinion and one shared by more than a few I have spoken with Orthodox and otherwise. In fact, Fr. Thomas Hopko suggests nearly as much.

Some of the OT can get tedious and confusing. Also, these selections above really will bring out the clearly Christological nature of reading the OT which will conform to the reading you are doing of the Church Fathers.

Again, with whatever size piece of salt you wish to take it with.

EDIT: Regarding the Epistles, I would save Romans for last. Just because it is the most nuanced and "theological" of the Epistles. Again, I hope you do not take this as condescension. Just my experience and what has been shared with me by folks I respect.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2011, 04:07:09 PM by orthonorm » Logged

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Tags: Exodus 9:12 Orthodox Study Bible OSB Exodus Old Testament Septuagint LXX 
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