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Author Topic: The 24 Patron Saints of Korea  (Read 2647 times) Average Rating: 0
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samkim
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« on: October 03, 2010, 12:21:02 AM »

For your information...



The 24 Patron Saints of Korea:
(top left to right) Sts. Aukchentius, Evstlatios, Eugenios, Seraphim, Murmpetros, Martarios, Orestis,
(middle) Philothei, Georgos, Theoctisti, Nectarios, Makarios, Sergios, Panteleimon, Innokenti,
(bottom) Panagis, Haralambos, Silouanos, Maxim, Katarina, Nicholas, Theodora, Elizabeth, and Ignatios.

Pray for us!
« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 12:21:35 AM by samkim » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2010, 12:26:19 AM »

Wow korea has that many saints? I didn't expect to hear that. Isn't Korea mostly pentecostal? IN terms of Christians living there?
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2010, 12:51:13 AM »

Wow korea has that many saints? I didn't expect to hear that. Isn't Korea mostly pentecostal? IN terms of Christians living there?

I've never heard in my life that Korea is mostly pentecostal. I'm pretty sure there are Presbyterians. And those saints are not ethnic Korean. They are just the protectors of Korea.
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2010, 12:52:08 AM »





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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2010, 02:48:59 AM »

These are wonderful to see, thank you. Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2010, 01:11:35 PM »

Wonderful to see these pictures from Korea, Samkim.  Thanks for posting them!  The church is beautiful, but I wonder, though, why the Iconostasis is so low?
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2010, 01:18:08 PM »

These photos are very beautiful! Thank you for posting them.   Smiley   angel
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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2010, 01:53:10 PM »

I wonder, though, why the Iconostasis is so low?

The high icon screen is a later development.
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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2010, 01:57:43 PM »

"And those saints are not ethnic Korean. They are just the protectors of Korea."


What is their ethnic background?  How are these Saints known as Protectors of Korea?

Thanks!
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2010, 02:54:54 PM »

I wonder, though, why the Iconostasis is so low?

The high icon screen is a later development.

I seem to recall that I've read that somewhere before.  I wonder, though, when this change was made and if this particular Korean church was built before the change or if they simply wanted to create a 'pre-change' church? 
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« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2010, 05:13:13 PM »

I'm sure the choice of iconostasis in that church was a stylistic decision.  The templon was the forerunner to the full height iconostasis.
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« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2010, 11:19:58 PM »

"And those saints are not ethnic Korean. They are just the protectors of Korea."


What is their ethnic background?  How are these Saints known as Protectors of Korea?

Thanks!

These saints are well known Orthodox saints (have you never heard of St. Seraphim? or Nektarios? or Silouan?). They are the protectors of Korea because these saints are called on to be the patrons of Korea.

I wonder, though, why the Iconostasis is so low?

The high icon screen is a later development.

I seem to recall that I've read that somewhere before.  I wonder, though, when this change was made and if this particular Korean church was built before the change or if they simply wanted to create a 'pre-change' church? 

The low altar is just a stylistic choice. Low icon screens existed in ANCIENT times. Like, before the schism with Rome. The western altar rail and the eastern iconostasis both come the same ancestor.
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« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2010, 12:03:01 AM »

Thank you samkin for this thread.  It is wonderful!
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« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2010, 01:55:26 AM »

None of these saints are Korean.

Korea has many martyrs and saints of its own who deserve to be called 'patron saints of Korea.'
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« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2010, 02:36:48 AM »

TROLL ALERT  Cheesy
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« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2010, 02:38:01 AM »

TROLL ALERT  Cheesy
Do you have a particular person in mind?
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« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2010, 02:41:05 AM »

None of these saints are Korean.

Korea has many martyrs and saints of its own who deserve to be called 'patron saints of Korea.'

That's fine and dandy for Catholics. But until there are native Korean Orthodox saints (we're talking about the Orthodox Church after all, not the Catholic), we will do more than fine with these saints.
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« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2010, 06:13:42 AM »

None of these saints are Korean.

Korea has many martyrs and saints of its own who deserve to be called 'patron saints of Korea.'

Well, this wouldn't be the first time when  patron saints are chosen with questionable reasons.  Wink
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« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2010, 10:03:43 AM »

Very cool! I rather like the openness the low iconostasis creates.

For some background on the development of the iconostasis, here is an excerpt from "SOME PRINCIPLES OF ORTHODOX CHURCH ARCHITECTURE" by iconographer Aidan Hart.

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The iconostasis and altar

Common to all churches, basilican and otherwise, is some sort of partition between the altar area and the nave - variously called the iconostasis, icon screen and templon.. Nowadays this consists of a three doored screen with icons of the Saviour, the Mother of God, saints and, usually, of liturgical feasts. This iconostasis aims to reinforce on the horizontal axis what is depicted on the vertical axis - namely the incarnation of God (Christ born of the Virgin) and the deification of the human person (the saints). As a wall, the iconostasis shows us that we are not yet in heaven, that we are on a journey. And simultaneously, as an array of icons and as a wall with doors, it shows how heaven and earth have been united in Christ.

This at least is the theory. In reality, in many cases the screen has become so massive that many argue that it serves only to separate the faithful from the holiness of the sanctuary and Holy Table rather than to unite them with it. When designing a screen these two roles of partition and unification need to be kept in balance, without one dominating the other.

The nature of this partition has changed over the centuries, so that in our times it is possible to draw on a wide variety of traditional arrangements, selecting those best suited to the pastoral and other needs of the Church community. Because the congregation face this screen throughout all the services it plays a very dominant role in setting the theological and spiritual atmosphere of those services. It is therefore imperative that the screen’s design is based on a good understanding of its theology, its history and indigenous customs and materials. The iconostasis has particular importance for those communities who have to make do with a church not designed for Orthodox worship, because it is one of the few architectural elements - and often the only - which they have the freedom to develop; conservation planning regulations usually limit what they can do to the rest of the structure. The iconostasis therefore deserves some space in this paper.

First, a summary description of the screen’s historical development, and then a discussion of some of the issues to be considered in designing a screen.

The partition existed from the first centuries of the Church, but only as a low partition, perhaps around one metre high, with a central opening in front of the altar. It is not known for certain if all, most, or just a few of the very early “house churches” had such a barrier, but archaeological finds do show they existed early on. The foundations for one exist, for example, in a house turned into church in Salon, Dalmatia, dated to around 300 AD. Given the Jewish temple tradition and that of virtually all other religions of having some form of demarcation between the central sacred space and outlying areas, it is probably safe to assume that the majority if not all the early churches had such a demarcation.

From the time of the legalisation of Christianity in 313 AD until the iconoclastic period (beginning 726), this low partition tended to project out into the nave, becoming three sided. This was in response to liturgical developments. The Greek archaeologist A.K. Orlandos has in drawings reconstructed two such fourth century screens as he believes they existed, one in a church at Daphousiae in Locris and another at Olympia, both in Greece. The first is a three sided low carved wall with a simple opening for the entrance to the altar. In the second church the front partition stretches between two pillars, and has two smaller columns either side of the central opening, surmounted by an arch. The side walls are thick undecorated extensions of the pillars’ plinths.

As time went on in this period, further columns tended to be added to the wall, with an architrave placed on top. According to Thomas Matthews’ reconstruction, such a screen existed in the sixth century Hagia Euphemia in Constantinople.5 This church and others also had a walled walkway from the screen’s central opening to the ambo (the slightly raised platform from where was read the Gospel).

From the time of the restoration of icons in 843 until the fall of Constantinople to the Crusaders (the Middle Byzantine period) we see icons of the Saviour, the Virgin and John the Baptist being placed upon the architrave. As an alternative to this, or sometimes as well as these icons, we see images of the Saviour and the Virgin on the piers either end of the screen and dividing the sanctuary from the chapels either side. Such a screen can be seen at Torcello Cathedral, Venice, built as a Byzantine basilica in the 1100’s. Pier icons can be seen as frescoes at St. Panteleimon in Nerezi, Macedonia (1000-1100s) and in the Protaton church at Mount Athos (13th century).

In the late Byzantine church (1261-1453) we see icons of the Saviour, the Virgin and saints being placed in the spaces between the columns of the screen itself. Osios Lukas in Greece (11th century) as it can be seen now has such a screen, with the openings to the side chapels still left without doors.

In the post-Byzantine Church, that is, from the fall of Constantinople to our own times, we see the extension of the screen upwards and also sideways, to enclose the side rooms. It is in Russia around the beginning of the fifteenth century that the very high screen is developed, with up to five tiers of icons. Although this number of tiers is not usually reached outside Russia, there was throughout the Orthodox world a tendency for increased height, often including, as in Athos, crucifixes two or more metres high surmounting the screen.

What are we to make of these developments when choosing a screen type in our own times? Clearly the preferences of the community itself is a major factor. But on a broader scale there are other theological factors which ought to be considered. Many people say, for example, that high screens create too much of a visual and a psychological barrier between the faithful and the sanctuary, making the Liturgy too much of a spectacle performed by the clergy and observed by the faithful. And even then, so much of the liturgical action happens behind the screen, such as the proskoimedia, making even these events invisible to the faithful.

Another issue is that a high screen obscures the apse and its iconography, so destroying the important symbolism of the “womb” through which Christ become man and dwells with us. One such example is the later screen at St. Catherine’s, Mount Sinai, which obscures the ancient apse mosaic of the Transfiguration.

I have seen a number of small private chapels where considerations of space and personal preference have led to the omission of the screen altogether. In its place are two stands (analogia) with icons of the Saviour and the Mother of God, placed where these icons would have been if there were a screen - that is, either side of the entrance in front of the Holy Table. This has allowed a more intimate participation by the congregation in all aspects of the Holy Liturgy. This arrangement is in essence a return to the house church design of the first centuries.

I am told that there also exist churches in the middle east which have retained this primitive chancel wall arrangement. Among these are St George’s Saydnaya in Syria, St John of Damascus in Balamand, and other monasteries near Tripoli.

Most contemporary congregations would probably feel the reduction of an iconscreen back to the primitive chancel wall is too radical a step. In this case the aim would be to keep the iconscreen as low as possible - for example, with just the bottom row of icons, and just high enough to allow the comfortable passage of clergy (including the bishop’s mitre!) - about seven feet.

Whatever arrangement is chosen, it is important to know that the iconscreen has not always been as it now is, that over the centuries the church has always been very creative and flexible in its design.
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« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2010, 03:49:13 PM »

Very cool! I rather like the openness the low iconostasis creates.

For some background on the development of the iconostasis, here is an excerpt from "SOME PRINCIPLES OF ORTHODOX CHURCH ARCHITECTURE" by iconographer Aidan Hart.

Could you provide the source link of that?
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« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2010, 06:10:40 PM »

Very cool! I rather like the openness the low iconostasis creates.

For some background on the development of the iconostasis, here is an excerpt from "SOME PRINCIPLES OF ORTHODOX CHURCH ARCHITECTURE" by iconographer Aidan Hart.

Could you provide the source link of that?

I found it back:
http://www.aidanharticons.com/articles/mar09/orthodox_church_architecture.pdf

It's an interesting piece, worth reading the whole thing.
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« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2010, 06:13:30 PM »

Thank you for posting. I heard a couple of podcasts about that, and I think I'll enjoy the reading as well.
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« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2010, 06:20:10 PM »

I find their iconostasis rather interesting.  Makes the one at New Skete look traditionalist...lol
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« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2010, 06:35:06 PM »

This is interesting:



http://www.andrewjosephsopko.org/Constantinople/ea.html
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« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2010, 11:57:29 AM »


I remember that in my seminary class with Fr. Bazyl.  I wonder how this would received, if new churches followed this pattern?  I'm all for it.
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« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2010, 11:19:28 PM »

None of these saints are Korean.

Korea has many martyrs and saints of its own who deserve to be called 'patron saints of Korea.'

Well, this wouldn't be the first time when  patron saints are chosen with questionable reasons.  Wink

What are you suggesting?
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« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2011, 04:55:30 PM »

I find their iconostasis rather interesting.  Makes the one at New Skete look traditionalist...lol

If traditional means old, then low screens are more traditional.
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