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Author Topic: Am I a Christian?  (Read 783 times) Average Rating: 0
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the_typist
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« on: May 04, 2011, 04:03:01 PM »

If a person (such as myself) doesn't belong to any church, yet believes in God and church (Trinity, Sacraments, Works etc.) then what am I called?

I am an ex Protestant but I don't belong or believe in the way of the Protestant church.  I am also neither Catholic nor Orthodox and I am certainly not in a cult such as LDS or Jehova Witness etc. 

I am just a guy who might convert to the Orthodox church but until then I am just "here". I am sure there are a lot of people in my shoes right now and I wanted to know what we are called. Thanks,

M

(hopefully this makes sense)
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PoorFoolNicholas
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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2011, 04:09:05 PM »

A catechumen.
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Asteriktos
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2011, 04:12:15 PM »

I would certaintly consider you a Christian... and besides that a potential convert to target!  Grin
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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2011, 04:13:49 PM »

Enquirer, seeker

Your beliefs in general seem to be Christian. Are you baptized?
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2011, 04:35:45 PM »

Enquirer, seeker

Your beliefs in general seem to be Christian. Are you baptized?


I was baptized when I four years old. I've been told many times that that doesn't count? Anyways, it was in the Methodist church and my family never attended church regularly (ever). When I became a "born again christian" in the Foursquare church I didn't get baptized there either. And 11 years later and I am still in the same spot as then, sort of.

M
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2011, 05:01:15 PM »

Enquirer, seeker

Your beliefs in general seem to be Christian. Are you baptized?


I was baptized when I four years old. I've been told many times that that doesn't count?

It should.
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And FWIW, these are our Fathers too, you know.

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the_typist
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2011, 05:13:14 PM »

A catechumen.

I meant to say this on my last post but I forgot - I haven't started my catechumanate yet either.

M
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« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2011, 05:17:06 PM »

Enquirer, seeker

Your beliefs in general seem to be Christian. Are you baptized?


I was baptized when I four years old. I've been told many times that that doesn't count?

It doesn't count as a valid baptism, but the Orthodox Church can fill the empty form with grace (note however that many Orthodox would disagree with this) Smiley
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JamesRottnek
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« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2011, 07:35:41 PM »

I would say, speaking as someone who is not yet a part of the Church, that no, you are not a Christian.  You are, however, definitely a very potential Christian.  I encourage you to start attending an Orthodox Church near you.
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« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2011, 07:46:17 PM »

I would say, speaking as someone who is not yet a part of the Church, that no, you are not a Christian.  You are, however, definitely a very potential Christian.  I encourage you to start attending an Orthodox Church near you.

I think what you are saying is within the realm of possible Orthodox views, so please don't misunderstand what I'm going to say. Nonetheless, I'm not sure that defining the term Christian as narrowly as you are doing (?) is helpful. Unlike baptism, I don't think the usage of the term Christian is a dogmatic issue, but rather one of labels and identification, and I don't wonder if we shouldn't use a bit of economia in this area.  How exactly would you define or describe who qualifies as a Christian? Someone who is part of the Eastern Orthodox Church? Oriental Orthodox Church? Roman Catholic Church? Thoughts?
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« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2011, 07:48:36 PM »

If a person (such as myself) doesn't belong to any church, yet believes in God and church (Trinity, Sacraments, Works etc.) then what am I called?

I am an ex Protestant but I don't belong or believe in the way of the Protestant church.  I am also neither Catholic nor Orthodox and I am certainly not in a cult such as LDS or Jehova Witness etc. 

I am just a guy who might convert to the Orthodox church but until then I am just "here". I am sure there are a lot of people in my shoes right now and I wanted to know what we are called. Thanks,

M

(hopefully this makes sense)

I can relate to this, this is exactly the sort of question I would have asked immediatly after I abandoned Protestantism.

In hindsight, for myself, I'd say the answer is no. This is because my focus was on the philosophical and while I claimed belief in God, it was not an active belief. I was more interested in the knowledge of men.

Are you a Christian though? I don't know, and I suppose it is a question you'll have to answer in the future. For now I suggest you seek after God with fear and Trembling. Research the Orthodox Church, and research the Catholic Church, research other churches that you believe have some claim to Truth., ask questions, and in time, whether or not you are a Christian now, will not matter.
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« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2011, 08:38:52 PM »

A catechumen.

I meant to say this on my last post but I forgot - I haven't started my catechumanate yet either.

M

That would be the best thing. It simply means that you are learning and moving towards the Church. It also means you will be prayed for at the Alter, which may help more than you realize.
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« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2011, 09:08:33 PM »

Ok. Thank you all for your answers!  Grin

M
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JamesRottnek
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« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2011, 11:56:19 PM »

I would say, speaking as someone who is not yet a part of the Church, that no, you are not a Christian.  You are, however, definitely a very potential Christian.  I encourage you to start attending an Orthodox Church near you.

I think what you are saying is within the realm of possible Orthodox views, so please don't misunderstand what I'm going to say. Nonetheless, I'm not sure that defining the term Christian as narrowly as you are doing (?) is helpful. Unlike baptism, I don't think the usage of the term Christian is a dogmatic issue, but rather one of labels and identification, and I don't wonder if we shouldn't use a bit of economia in this area.  How exactly would you define or describe who qualifies as a Christian? Someone who is part of the Eastern Orthodox Church? Oriental Orthodox Church? Roman Catholic Church? Thoughts?

In my opinion (and keep in mind this is merely my opinion, I am not trying to speak for anyone or anything - let alone the Holy Orthodox Church of which I am not even a part), the very word Christian implies you are a member of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.  As such, it should be a person received into the Orthodox Church, either through baptism and then chrismation in the Church, or through those claiming to be the Church baptising such a person and the Orthodox Church giving the baptism grace by christmating the person and receiving them.  The person should also believe the dogmas of the Church, and should be in good standing (not be excommunicated).  I think that when you let anyone claim the word Christian, and don't say that they are not really a Christian (at least if they ask you, if they don't ask yo I can accept and myself would probably not, correct them our of politeness) then you tacitly accept non-Orthodox Churches of bein - or at least being part of - the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.  I think, in a way, it would be the same as saying that you are an American, by that most people assume you mean an American citizen, not just someone who likes America.  As such, I would say taht no, the Roman Catholic Church does not get to call itself Christian, nor those inside of it (of course, I obviously mean they can call themselves such, but I do not accept it as truth).  Would I agree that someone in the OO Church is a Christian, I am not sure.  I have thought from time to time about it, because I do believe that the EO and OO share one faith, but are they really part of the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church?  I think they are somewhere between being part of the Church, and being schismatics.  Which they are closer to, I am not sure.

Anyways, this could simply be a holdover from when I used to be an evangelical protestant and regularly tell people how Roman Catholics were not Christians.
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« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2011, 01:03:02 AM »

Enquirer, seeker

Your beliefs in general seem to be Christian. Are you baptized?


I was baptized when I four years old. I've been told many times that that doesn't count?

It doesn't count as a valid baptism, but the Orthodox Church can fill the empty form with grace (note however that many Orthodox would disagree with this) Smiley

On more than one premise. I have seen Orthodox say that heterodox, Trinitarian baptisms are legitimate. I have seen Orthodox espouse the position you described here. And I've seen Orthodox who say that all must receive an Orthodox Baptism.
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« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2011, 01:04:53 AM »

I would say, speaking as someone who is not yet a part of the Church, that no, you are not a Christian.  You are, however, definitely a very potential Christian.  I encourage you to start attending an Orthodox Church near you.

I think what you are saying is within the realm of possible Orthodox views, so please don't misunderstand what I'm going to say. Nonetheless, I'm not sure that defining the term Christian as narrowly as you are doing (?) is helpful. Unlike baptism, I don't think the usage of the term Christian is a dogmatic issue, but rather one of labels and identification, and I don't wonder if we shouldn't use a bit of economia in this area.  How exactly would you define or describe who qualifies as a Christian? Someone who is part of the Eastern Orthodox Church? Oriental Orthodox Church? Roman Catholic Church? Thoughts?

IMO, most strictly speaking, a Christian is a member of the Oriental Orthodox Church. But there are other senses of how the term Christian can be used.
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« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2011, 04:09:15 PM »

If a person (such as myself) doesn't belong to any church, yet believes in God and church (Trinity, Sacraments, Works etc.) then what am I called?

I am an ex Protestant but I don't belong or believe in the way of the Protestant church.  I am also neither Catholic nor Orthodox and I am certainly not in a cult such as LDS or Jehova Witness etc. 

I am just a guy who might convert to the Orthodox church but until then I am just "here". I am sure there are a lot of people in my shoes right now and I wanted to know what we are called. Thanks,

M

(hopefully this makes sense)

I find myself in a lot of positions that you do.  Don't feel bad.  This is why near my name you see "cup of Anabaptist", because they don't consider themselves Protestant nor Catholic.  But I do lean Orthodox without a doubt.

I believe in the Anabaptist conservative nature, which is the way I feel most Orthodox should live.  ie- the family life.   Not that the EO is bad per se, but there is a lot more "awareness" the Anabaptists have on just "accepting something new" that is worldly.   For instance, main stream music.  I've seen gobs of EO kids playing Lady Gaga songs that are satanic & gnostic, and completely laced in sexual suggestions.   Anabaptists would not accept this.  Orthodox in general "don't" accept it either, but there are some that would tolerate it.

Anabaptists as a complete culture would reject it.  It's kind of  hard to explain.
 
Basically I wish the Orthodox would be this alert.  I duck saying that because "they are alert", but still not.  Most have TV in their homes and don't realize how much wicked and evil is shown.  Anabaptists don't accept TV.

In prayer and tradition EO have it down pat for the most part.

So it leaves me often stuck.

In a perfect world we'd have Orthodox in prayer and an Anabaptist family life.  LOL.  My opinion of course.
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