Author Topic: Lay Groups  (Read 545 times)

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Offline Justin Kissel

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Lay Groups
« on: May 02, 2011, 11:19:28 PM »
Out of curiosity, why do you'all think that things like lay associations/secular orders/etc. developed in Catholicism and not in Orthodoxy? I mean, there are some groups here and there in Orthodoxy that are sort of/kinda similar, but nothing like what the Catholics have.

Offline podkarpatska

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2011, 09:50:27 AM »
Out of curiosity, why do you'all think that things like lay associations/secular orders/etc. developed in Catholicism and not in Orthodoxy? I mean, there are some groups here and there in Orthodoxy that are sort of/kinda similar, but nothing like what the Catholics have.

??? In the USA :  GOYA, FOCA, SOYO, ACRY, Archons, OCF, YAM, LADIES PHILOPTOCHOS SOCIETY,Fellowship of Orthodox Stewards,Order of St. Ignatius,Antiochian Orthodox Christian Women of North America,SAINT ANDREW'S UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX SOCIETY, United Ukrainian Orthodox Sisterhoods, UOL,AROLA,ROYA and I am sure that I left off many others, please don't be offended, I just did a quick Google search.

Offline sainthieu

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2011, 11:06:13 AM »
I assume, for the purposes of this post, that you are referring to Roman Catholics who are interested in transcending their traditional role as laymen and aspire to become semi-monastic.

The practice of Orthodoxy, IMO, is inherently more monastic than the practice of Roman Catholicism. It imposes a high degree of asceticism on the laity (monasticism-lite). Consequently, there is not as stark a contrast between the layman and the priest or monk. We are all called upon to be saints. The Orthodox Church is also a fairly "shallow" organization, as organizational structures go: less hierarchy. Therefore, less feeling of isolation from the leaders of the church. Plus, it has been using the same liturgy for centuries--a liturgy composed largely of quotes from the Bible, and as nourishing now as it was when it was originally created. I don't need to join a lay group to find Orthodox who are as serious about religion as I am. Other than the kinds of groups already formed to address certain issues and constituencies--as podkarpatska notes--what need is there? I'm in the only "lay group" I'll ever need.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 11:17:53 AM by sainthieu »

Offline podkarpatska

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 12:20:18 PM »
^There are no Orthodox counterparts to Roman Catholic lay societies such as a Rosary Society  for example. I am of the opinion that organizations like the ones I listed are crucial to the parish life of your average Orthodox parish. Those who participate willingly and openly in the support organizations, social clubs and missions and missions of a parish are usually the 'backbone' of the faith community. Yes, from time to time some of these groups have led to factions within a parish, but I suspect that the underlying causes of such a faction would likely flare up with our without them.