Author Topic: Lay Groups  (Read 797 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Lay Groups
« on: May 02, 2011, 11:19:28 PM »
Out of curiosity, why do you'all think that things like lay associations/secular orders/etc. developed in Catholicism and not in Orthodoxy? I mean, there are some groups here and there in Orthodoxy that are sort of/kinda similar, but nothing like what the Catholics have.
"The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny--it is the light that guides your way." - Heraclitus

Offline podkarpatska

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2011, 09:50:27 AM »
Out of curiosity, why do you'all think that things like lay associations/secular orders/etc. developed in Catholicism and not in Orthodoxy? I mean, there are some groups here and there in Orthodoxy that are sort of/kinda similar, but nothing like what the Catholics have.

??? In the USA :  GOYA, FOCA, SOYO, ACRY, Archons, OCF, YAM, LADIES PHILOPTOCHOS SOCIETY,Fellowship of Orthodox Stewards,Order of St. Ignatius,Antiochian Orthodox Christian Women of North America,SAINT ANDREW'S UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX SOCIETY, United Ukrainian Orthodox Sisterhoods, UOL,AROLA,ROYA and I am sure that I left off many others, please don't be offended, I just did a quick Google search.

Offline sainthieu

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2011, 11:06:13 AM »
I assume, for the purposes of this post, that you are referring to Roman Catholics who are interested in transcending their traditional role as laymen and aspire to become semi-monastic.

The practice of Orthodoxy, IMO, is inherently more monastic than the practice of Roman Catholicism. It imposes a high degree of asceticism on the laity (monasticism-lite). Consequently, there is not as stark a contrast between the layman and the priest or monk. We are all called upon to be saints. The Orthodox Church is also a fairly "shallow" organization, as organizational structures go: less hierarchy. Therefore, less feeling of isolation from the leaders of the church. Plus, it has been using the same liturgy for centuries--a liturgy composed largely of quotes from the Bible, and as nourishing now as it was when it was originally created. I don't need to join a lay group to find Orthodox who are as serious about religion as I am. Other than the kinds of groups already formed to address certain issues and constituencies--as podkarpatska notes--what need is there? I'm in the only "lay group" I'll ever need.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 11:17:53 AM by sainthieu »

Offline podkarpatska

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Re: Lay Groups
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 12:20:18 PM »
^There are no Orthodox counterparts to Roman Catholic lay societies such as a Rosary Society  for example. I am of the opinion that organizations like the ones I listed are crucial to the parish life of your average Orthodox parish. Those who participate willingly and openly in the support organizations, social clubs and missions and missions of a parish are usually the 'backbone' of the faith community. Yes, from time to time some of these groups have led to factions within a parish, but I suspect that the underlying causes of such a faction would likely flare up with our without them.