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Author Topic: Great Entrance blessing?  (Read 1482 times) Average Rating: 0
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William
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« on: May 01, 2011, 07:15:55 PM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?
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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2011, 08:10:56 PM »

At our church, the priest blesses all of the children with the chalice but generally not the adults. Children who have not been baptized/chrismated are also blessed, so I don't see why it should be a problem for you to get a blessing, but then again, different parishes have different rules so you might want to ask the priest or a deacon (or anyone else who might know). 
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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2011, 08:14:18 PM »

how interesting! I've only seen the priest bless everyone from the ambo with the chalice. 
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« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2011, 08:33:46 PM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?

I've always been taught it is not "correct" to prostrate during the great entrance other than during the Liturgy of the Pre-sanctified Gifts (the difference being, of course, than during the Pre-sanctified Liturgy, the entrance is made with the Precious Gifts, not ordinary bread and wine).
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« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2011, 08:35:46 PM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?

I've always been taught it is not "correct" to prostrate during the great entrance other than during the Liturgy of the Pre-sanctified Gifts (the difference being, of course, than during the Pre-sanctified Liturgy, the entrance is made with the Precious Gifts, not ordinary bread and wine).
and we traditionally don't prostrate during Bright Week, either.
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2011, 08:40:32 PM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?

I've always been taught it is not "correct" to prostrate during the great entrance other than during the Liturgy of the Pre-sanctified Gifts (the difference being, of course, than during the Pre-sanctified Liturgy, the entrance is made with the Precious Gifts, not ordinary bread and wine).
and we traditionally don't prostrate during Bright Week, either.

Indeed!

I confess to being one of those people who prostrates during the epiclesis, even on Sundays (gasp).
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« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2011, 10:00:20 AM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?

What is the national tradition of the church you visited? It is common in the Romanian tradition for everyone to kneel during the Great Entrance, and it is also common for the clergy to bless people by holding things like chalices and Gospel books over them in liturgical contexts, including in Divine Liturgies.

Such things do happen in many Orthodox traditions, even in the Byzantine tradition, but just a lot less frequently and only in certain contexts. The Romanians do this type of thing a lot, and they also kneel way more than any other Orthodox tradition (including multiple times on Sunday).

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?
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« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2011, 07:27:13 PM »

It's Antiochian.
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« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2011, 10:53:04 AM »

It's Antiochian.
If it's a heavily ethnic parish, it might be a Middle Eastern custom. I haven't seen it in any Antiochian parishes that I have visited.
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« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2011, 02:09:06 PM »

I confess to being one of those people who prostrates during the epiclesis, even on Sundays (gasp).

Same here, and I am unapologetic about it.  The canons about praying "on bended knees" on Sundays seem to have been understood differently in different times and places, and I'm afraid that their extension to precluding prostrations at the epiklesis on Sundays leaves me entirely unconvinced.  It is also the view of my bishop that "there is room for such variety in the Church" so I am not being disobedient in doing what my heart calls me to do at the most awesome part of the Church's corporate worship of its Creator.

M
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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2011, 04:53:22 PM »

Outside of the Paschal season everyone in the altar prostrates at the epiclesis
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« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2011, 07:35:53 PM »

Outside of the Paschal season everyone in the altar prostrates at the epiclesis


Interesting. At my parish, the servers in the altar at the Paschal Liturgy only make a low bow at the epiclesis, not a prostration. However, otherwise, it is always a full prostration, even during Bright Week.
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« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2011, 09:59:57 AM »

how interesting! I've only seen the priest bless everyone from the ambo with the chalice. 

I've seen both. The restoration of the Great Entrance procession has come into practice among some priests and jurisdictions over the past few decades.
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« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2011, 10:01:26 AM »

During Divine Liturgy this morning, the clergy processed around the Church with chalices. I'm assuming that this was the Great Entrance. But some people brought out mats and knelt on them outside the pews. As Father passed them he would hold the chalice above their heads and bless them.

Is this a common thing? Could I, as an inquirer, do it?

What is the national tradition of the church you visited? It is common in the Romanian tradition for everyone to kneel during the Great Entrance, and it is also common for the clergy to bless people by holding things like chalices and Gospel books over them in liturgical contexts, including in Divine Liturgies.

Such things do happen in many Orthodox traditions, even in the Byzantine tradition, but just a lot less frequently and only in certain contexts. The Romanians do this type of thing a lot, and they also kneel way more than any other Orthodox tradition (including multiple times on Sunday).

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?

The Carpatho-Russians kneel as do the Romanians, but not at the Great Entrance, excepting for Pre-Sanctified Liturgy.
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« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2011, 12:15:46 PM »

If the church isn't heavily ethnic, it may be a Weird Convert Thing. I can say this, since I'm a convert. It's funny sometimes. One person does something out of the ordinary, and then several more do it, too. At my mostly convert church, at the trisagion, we used to only make three metanias, and then after "with strength," we would just cross ourselves and bow a little. Now, for some odd reason, people are doing four metanias.

I have only seen blessing with the chalice during the great entrance once, with a rather strange, now ex-priest, and a woman who had cancer. I'm not really sure what the point of great entrance blessings is. I view them the same way I view icon veneration after communion. People are about to, or have just received Christ, why venerate/get blessed by an icon or that which is not yet Christ? I don't really get it.
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« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2011, 04:46:51 PM »

Outside of the Paschal season everyone in the altar prostrates at the epiclesis


Interesting. At my parish, the servers in the altar at the Paschal Liturgy only make a low bow at the epiclesis, not a prostration. However, otherwise, it is always a full prostration, even during Bright Week.

we don't prostrate in the altar at all from Pascha to Pentecost
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« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2011, 06:43:35 PM »

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?

I've seen this at St. Michael's in Louisville, KY, an Antiochian Parish which has people from various traditions including Greek, Russian and Arab.

I've never liked the idea of the priest blessing individuals as he does the Great Entrance.  IMHO, such an act ceases from being liturgy, work of the people, to work of the few.

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« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2011, 10:32:56 PM »

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?

I've seen this at St. Michael's in Louisville, KY, an Antiochian Parish which has people from various traditions including Greek, Russian and Arab.
That's the parish.
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« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2011, 11:10:09 PM »

In Greece, during the Epiclesis, everyone bows their heads, some bow at the waist, and everyone remains dead silent during the entirety of the Anaphora.
In our parish, we do not kneel on Sunday, however the Priest will prostrate at the epiclesis if the Liturgy isn't on a Sunday. Otherwise a deep bow at the waist is made after the third Amen. (though obviously that isn't always typical)

I haven't heard of that practice with the Great Entrance though. I know they are still blessed and will become the body & blood of Christ, but is the veneration showed because of what they will become later on in the Liturgy?
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« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2011, 11:50:30 PM »

While we're on the topic of prostrations and kneeling on Sundays and all that ...

I was talking to one of my cousins about prostrating during the Divine Liturgy and she, although brought up in the Orthodox faith and a sometime church-attender, was not aware that we even make prostrations.

There is something scandalous about this, I believe, but I can't quite put my finger on it.
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« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2011, 05:26:47 AM »

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?
I've seen this at St. Michael's in Louisville, KY, an Antiochian Parish which has people from various traditions including Greek, Russian and Arab.
That's the parish.

I've only ever seen this in Antiochian churches - and heavily "ethnic" Antiochian churches, at that - where some people would bow during the Great Entrance and the priest would place the chalice on their heads.
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« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2011, 10:42:55 AM »

I've never seen anyone bring mats, though. Sounds kind of OO, actually, or maybe just a peculiar tradition of the particular village/region where the people in this parish come from?
I've seen this at St. Michael's in Louisville, KY, an Antiochian Parish which has people from various traditions including Greek, Russian and Arab.
That's the parish.

I've only ever seen this in Antiochian churches - and heavily "ethnic" Antiochian churches, at that - where some people would bow during the Great Entrance and the priest would place the chalice on their heads.
It's a custom very common among Romanians as well. Makes me glad to know  Arabs have it too.
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