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Author Topic: Christian sites in Turkey draw pilgrims  (Read 630 times) Average Rating: 0
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biro
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« on: May 04, 2011, 06:53:41 PM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
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All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.
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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2011, 09:07:39 PM »

Turkey is a beautiful country, and it has some amazing sites.

The two the stand out for me though are Smyrna - rebuilt since it was destroyed by the Turks in the Greco-Turkish War, it is a city that is quite obviously without faith as you can see very few places of worship from the Citadel.

The other is nearby Philadelphia, where the 80 year old ruins of the Church of St. John still stand, though they look far older.
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WetCatechumen
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2011, 11:32:57 PM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
Quote
All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.


What astounds me and offends me is that the pastor of my girlfriend's Protestant ecclesial community, Mark Driscoll, is doing a series (or did do) on the early churches in Turkey.

It always astounds me how he basically ignores the fact that Orthodoxy is all over Jesus' backyard and neighbor's yards. It's ridiculous.

This many continually mocks the Catholic and Orthodox Faith in his sermons and does not recognize the honor or status of any ancient Christian Church, yet he dares to act like these sadly empty sites are memorials to HIS new religion.

But I'm glad pilgrims can go there.
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"And because they have nothing better to do, they take cushion and chairs to Rome. And while the Pope is saying liturgy, they go, 'Oh, oh, oh, filioque!' And the Pope say, 'Filioque? That-uh sound nice! I think I divide-uh the Church over it!'" - Comrade Real Presence
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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2011, 11:43:29 PM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
Quote
All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.


What astounds me and offends me is that the pastor of my girlfriend's Protestant ecclesial community, Mark Driscoll, is doing a series (or did do) on the early churches in Turkey.

It always astounds me how he basically ignores the fact that Orthodoxy is all over Jesus' backyard and neighbor's yards. It's ridiculous.

This many continually mocks the Catholic and Orthodox Faith in his sermons and does not recognize the honor or status of any ancient Christian Church, yet he dares to act like these sadly empty sites are memorials to HIS new religion.

But I'm glad pilgrims can go there.
My tour of Turkey was with a Protestant group. I was quite thankful that our group leader made sure everyone realized it was the Orthodox Church which had existed there.
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NicholasMyra
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« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2011, 01:11:38 AM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
Quote
All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.


What astounds me and offends me is that the pastor of my girlfriend's Protestant ecclesial community, Mark Driscoll, is doing a series (or did do) on the early churches in Turkey.

It always astounds me how he basically ignores the fact that Orthodoxy is all over Jesus' backyard and neighbor's yards. It's ridiculous.

This many continually mocks the Catholic and Orthodox Faith in his sermons and does not recognize the honor or status of any ancient Christian Church, yet he dares to act like these sadly empty sites are memorials to HIS new religion.

But I'm glad pilgrims can go there.
Obscure Seattlite demagogues get famous when people outside the Northwest fuss over their trolling. The way to stop them is by ignoring them.
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if Christ does and says x. And someone else does and says not x and you are ever in doubt, follow Christ.
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« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2011, 04:11:29 PM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
Quote
All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.


What astounds me and offends me is that the pastor of my girlfriend's Protestant ecclesial community, Mark Driscoll, is doing a series (or did do) on the early churches in Turkey.

It always astounds me how he basically ignores the fact that Orthodoxy is all over Jesus' backyard and neighbor's yards. It's ridiculous.

This many continually mocks the Catholic and Orthodox Faith in his sermons and does not recognize the honor or status of any ancient Christian Church, yet he dares to act like these sadly empty sites are memorials to HIS new religion.

But I'm glad pilgrims can go there.
Obscure Seattlite demagogues get famous when people outside the Northwest fuss over their trolling. The way to stop them is by ignoring them.
My girlfriend goes to his church. I'm kind of stuck.
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"And because they have nothing better to do, they take cushion and chairs to Rome. And while the Pope is saying liturgy, they go, 'Oh, oh, oh, filioque!' And the Pope say, 'Filioque? That-uh sound nice! I think I divide-uh the Church over it!'" - Comrade Real Presence
NicholasMyra
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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2011, 05:58:33 PM »

The country of Turkey contains many sites important to the history of Christianity. These locations attract ever more visitors.

From the article:
Quote
All seven councils were held on what is now Turkish soil — the two in Nicaea, three in Constantinople, now Istanbul, one in Ephesus in western Turkey and one in Chalcedon, the modern-day Kadikoy district of Istanbul on the Asian shore of the Bosphorus. Last year, Iznik invited historians from the Vatican to join a search for the exact location of the first Council of Nicaea, at which bishops from all over the Roman Empire gathered in 325 to draft the creed that is recited by Christians around the world to this day.


What astounds me and offends me is that the pastor of my girlfriend's Protestant ecclesial community, Mark Driscoll, is doing a series (or did do) on the early churches in Turkey.

It always astounds me how he basically ignores the fact that Orthodoxy is all over Jesus' backyard and neighbor's yards. It's ridiculous.

This many continually mocks the Catholic and Orthodox Faith in his sermons and does not recognize the honor or status of any ancient Christian Church, yet he dares to act like these sadly empty sites are memorials to HIS new religion.

But I'm glad pilgrims can go there.
Obscure Seattlite demagogues get famous when people outside the Northwest fuss over their trolling. The way to stop them is by ignoring them.
My girlfriend goes to his church. I'm kind of stuck.
Everyone around here has a friend/girlfriend/boyfriend who does, I know your pain.  Wink
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Quote from: Orthonorm
if Christ does and says x. And someone else does and says not x and you are ever in doubt, follow Christ.
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