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Author Topic: Discerning Catholic Priesthood  (Read 5095 times) Average Rating: 0
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Papist
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Praying for the Christians in Iraq


« Reply #90 on: April 29, 2011, 10:06:23 AM »

Christus resurrexit!
It does show that the Ultramontanist faith is one in vain.
Good thing no one here is an ultramontanist then.
You've renounced Pastor Aeternus?
No, he doesn't want to fall into heresy. That is your domain.
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Note Papist's influence from the tyrannical monarchism of traditional papism .
Wyatt
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« Reply #91 on: April 29, 2011, 12:26:07 PM »

You've renounced Pastor Aeternus?
I acknowledge the teachings of all the Ecumenical Councils, but that does not mean that I adhere to the Romaphobic interpretation of them.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2011, 12:26:20 PM by Wyatt » Logged
lubeltri
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« Reply #92 on: May 03, 2011, 06:57:38 PM »

If I interject, since this is a discussion board for opinions after all, I don't think that it's a good idea for Ignatius to convert if he doesn't have issues with the dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church. Everything sounds more practical. on his end, which makes sense, but it's not the right thing to do.

I personally would have returned to Roman Catholicism on my Mom's side of the family no matter what if I would have thought it to be true, and the diocese where I grew up was pretty much a liturgical wasteland. The priests were kind from what I can recall. But the important thing is what is true, not the immediate inconveniences we face.

For example, when I was considering become Orthodox, I visited all of the parishes (about eight) in my city to get a feeling for how Orthodoxy looked on the ground in all different kinds of situations. I wanted to know I could be faithful in the worse of environments in case I moved and I only had one "bad" option or none at all. There was a particular Serbian Church in the city with almost no English, and I later found out that the priest there was a belligerent drunk who would yell at acolytes behind the iconostasis, scold people severely during confessions, and almost never make communion available to people, really only at Christmas, Easter and a few other times. Even if you were keeping all of the church fasts and confessing (and getting yelled at) regularly, still no communion.

Anyway, all of that to say that I decided that even if this was the only church available to me then I would still go there, because I knew deep in my heart that Orthodoxy was the true faith established by Christ and remaining through the centuries. It just so happens that my city offers many many reverent Latin masses in traditionalist communities. I could have enjoyed those places and gotten a far more personal feeling of spiritual benefit out of them than at the Serbian church that I just mentioned. But at the end of the day I just couldn't buy into Papal Supremacy and Papal Infallibility as dogmatic truths of the Catholic faith. I just couldn't do it, because it's not the story I saw in history. Sure there were traces of their development over time, but I didn't see them as anything essential to the Catholic faith.

Anyway, all of that to say that I was fortunate to have the best of both worlds: a great parish with a loving priest to help me grow, and it was Eastern Orthodox. But everything that Ignatius is saying seems to have little to do with objecting to Roman Catholic teaching, which makes me think that any conversion might not be permanent or honest. For example, were he to move to another city after conversion with all that he wanted in the RCC of his previous town, would he "switch back"? I think that ultimately the decision has to be in pursuit of Truth no matter where it leads, even if it is not practically beneficial. When I became Orthodox, I became spiritually separated and alienated from my wife. But it was for His Truth, and He said that He would divide households, so I must be faithful to Truth no matter the immediate circumstances. IF we don't have Truth, what do we have?

I fully agree with you. From my end, I did the same. In my town, there was a very nice Greek Orthodox parish, and I was a member of the Orthodox Christian Fellowship at my university. The local Catholic parish left much to be desired! I'll spare you the horror stories. There was also a wonderful traditional Anglican parish in this town.

But I went Catholic for a reason, because I believed the Catholic Church is the church of Jesus Christ most fully and rightly ordered through time. It didn't matter how bad things looked on the ground where I was---all that meant was that God had given me an opportunity (with the help of his grace) to do something about it!
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lubeltri
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« Reply #93 on: May 03, 2011, 07:03:31 PM »

Christus resurrexit!
It does show that the Ultramontanist faith is one in vain.
Good thing no one here is an ultramontanist then.
You've renounced Pastor Aeternus?

"In fact, the First Vatican Council had in no way defined the pope as an absolute monarch. On the contrary, it presented him as the guarantor of obedience to the revealed Word. The pope’s authority is bound to the Tradition of faith. . . . The authority of the pope is not unlimited; it is at the service of Sacred Tradition."

Who wrote these words? Cardinal Ratzinger, of course.
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lubeltri
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« Reply #94 on: May 04, 2011, 01:42:06 AM »



Well if you lived on the left coast, I wouldnt be surprised to see a whole lot of that. I had a Benedictine Priest recomend Thomas Merton to me, not to mention he went ballistic when I mentioned my preference for the EF mass.  And this is in Cleveland, Ohio away from Kali.   After that Episode I limited my contact with the group(to be fair there is a Priest there that does infact celebrate the EF mass and he is the main one that does it in the Cleveland area so go figure....).



Indeed! I know that priest. When I took my father to Cleveland Clinic for cancer surgery, I had a couple of weeks to spend in Cleveland, and I went to a few traditional Masses celebrated by this Benedictine priest. I also went to a retreat he gave. Wonderful priest, and he had some stories about his community. Indeed there are some old dinosaurs in that monastery who are allergic to anything traditional. But he said things are changing---15 years ago he was considered some sort of freak, but he is now considered more mainstream.

BTW, St. Stephen's church in Cleveland (where he celebrates the traditional Mass) is one of the beautiful churches I've seen in the United States. It's one of those incredible German Gothic churches with magnificent wood carving all over the place and glorious stained glass windows. The sanctuary was eye-popping.
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KShaft
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« Reply #95 on: May 04, 2011, 02:38:54 AM »

Quote from: lubeltri link=topic=35570.msg564776#msg564776 date=1304487726

[/quote

Indeed! I know that priest. When I took my father to Cleveland Clinic for cancer surgery, I had a couple of weeks to spend in Cleveland, and I went to a few traditional Masses celebrated by this Benedictine priest. I also went to a retreat he gave. Wonderful priest, and he had some stories about his community. Indeed there are some old dinosaurs in that monastery who are allergic to anything traditional. But he said things are changing---15 years ago he was considered some sort of freak, but he is now considered more mainstream.

BTW, St. Stephen's church in Cleveland (where he celebrates the traditional Mass) is one of the beautiful churches I've seen in the United States. It's one of those incredible German Gothic churches with magnificent wood carving all over the place and glorious stained glass windows. The sanctuary was eye-popping.

http://www.ststephencleveland.org/

I know the Church well. He also does the noon mass at Immaculate Conception on Superior. There is another one that goes @ 6pm on Sundays. A low mass.  Different priest. Saint Stephen's is something else though. Glad you got to see it. 
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