Author Topic: THE OFFICE OF THE GREAT VESPERS OF PENTECOST  (Read 1236 times)

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Offline Ben

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THE OFFICE OF THE GREAT VESPERS OF PENTECOST
« on: May 26, 2004, 12:53:15 PM »
I would love more information on the historical development of the Great Vespers of Pentecost. I just read the text, and it sound truly amazing! I really can't wait until this Sunday, when I will be able to expirence it first hand, but I was just wondering the history behind this service.
"I prefer to be accused unjustly, for then I have nothing to reproach myself with, and joyfully offer this to the good Lord. Then I humble myself at the thought that I am indeed capable of doing the thing of which I have been accused. " - Saint

Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re:THE OFFICE OF THE GREAT VESPERS OF PENTECOST
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2004, 07:33:40 PM »
Are you talking about the "Kneeling Prayers" (Byzantine rite), or the Vespers served on the eve of Pentecost Sunday?
« Last Edit: May 26, 2004, 07:34:15 PM by Mor Ephrem »
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Offline Ben

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Re:THE OFFICE OF THE GREAT VESPERS OF PENTECOST
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2004, 08:10:17 PM »
Yes, the "kneeling" prayers usually done right after Divine Liturgy on Pentecost Sunday, here is a link to the text:

www.goarch.org/en/chapel/liturgical_texts/pentecost_kneel.asp?printit=yes
"I prefer to be accused unjustly, for then I have nothing to reproach myself with, and joyfully offer this to the good Lord. Then I humble myself at the thought that I am indeed capable of doing the thing of which I have been accused. " - Saint