OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 02, 2014, 01:51:08 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Catholic on the fence re: converting to orthodoxy  (Read 4589 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Fotina02
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 172



« Reply #45 on: March 14, 2012, 10:26:28 PM »



I thought that I would update on this topic.

I met with my priest yesterday to discuss. I advised that we had planned on doing the baptisms in early May, since the front office had told me that there are no baptisms during Lent. The priest said that was not accurate, so we are plowing ahead to baptize the kids ASAP.

I will also be accepted by chrismation.



Awesome.

Is your wife joining the Orthodox Church at the same time?

No, not at this time. I believe she will come in time. I believe that you can't argue anyone into believing, so have just done my best to live the faith (imperfectly as have been) and hope that what meager fruits I have would be a good influence. We also keep up the bible study and discussions.

The other week, I saw her cross herself during Liturgy and almost fell over. I was not prepared for that! (but overjoyed!)



Here's a link your wife may like (disregard if repeat):

http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/

Many years!!
Logged
Sauron
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
Posts: 844


« Reply #46 on: March 14, 2012, 10:49:59 PM »



I thought that I would update on this topic.

I met with my priest yesterday to discuss. I advised that we had planned on doing the baptisms in early May, since the front office had told me that there are no baptisms during Lent. The priest said that was not accurate, so we are plowing ahead to baptize the kids ASAP.

I will also be accepted by chrismation.



Awesome.

Is your wife joining the Orthodox Church at the same time?

No, not at this time. I believe she will come in time. I believe that you can't argue anyone into believing, so have just done my best to live the faith (imperfectly as have been) and hope that what meager fruits I have would be a good influence. We also keep up the bible study and discussions.

The other week, I saw her cross herself during Liturgy and almost fell over. I was not prepared for that! (but overjoyed!)



Here's a link your wife may like (disregard if repeat):

http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/

Many years!!

Thank you very much. I believe I have shown it to her some time ago, but I think that was when we first started going. I think it is worth another visit.

This is the church that is closest to her house in Japan. We plan to attend during our annual summer trip this June:
http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/annai/n-osaka.html

Logged
Fotina02
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 172



« Reply #47 on: March 14, 2012, 11:49:17 PM »



I thought that I would update on this topic.

I met with my priest yesterday to discuss. I advised that we had planned on doing the baptisms in early May, since the front office had told me that there are no baptisms during Lent. The priest said that was not accurate, so we are plowing ahead to baptize the kids ASAP.

I will also be accepted by chrismation.



Awesome.

Is your wife joining the Orthodox Church at the same time?

No, not at this time. I believe she will come in time. I believe that you can't argue anyone into believing, so have just done my best to live the faith (imperfectly as have been) and hope that what meager fruits I have would be a good influence. We also keep up the bible study and discussions.

The other week, I saw her cross herself during Liturgy and almost fell over. I was not prepared for that! (but overjoyed!)



Here's a link your wife may like (disregard if repeat):

http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/

Many years!!

Thank you very much. I believe I have shown it to her some time ago, but I think that was when we first started going. I think it is worth another visit.

This is the church that is closest to her house in Japan. We plan to attend during our annual summer trip this June:
http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/annai/n-osaka.html



St Nicholas of Japan worked tirelessly to found the Church of Japan.

    O holy Saint Nicholas, the Enlightener of Japan,
    You share the dignity and the throne of the Apostles:
    You are a wise and faithful servant of Christ,
    A temple chosen by the Divine Spirit,
    A vessel overflowing with the love of Christ.
    O hierarch equal to the Apostles,
    Pray to the life-creating Trinity
    For all your flock and for the whole world.

http://orthodoxwiki.org/Nicholas_of_Japan
Logged
Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #48 on: March 14, 2012, 11:56:08 PM »



I thought that I would update on this topic.

I met with my priest yesterday to discuss. I advised that we had planned on doing the baptisms in early May, since the front office had told me that there are no baptisms during Lent. The priest said that was not accurate, so we are plowing ahead to baptize the kids ASAP.

I will also be accepted by chrismation.



Awesome.

Is your wife joining the Orthodox Church at the same time?

No, not at this time. I believe she will come in time. I believe that you can't argue anyone into believing, so have just done my best to live the faith (imperfectly as have been) and hope that what meager fruits I have would be a good influence. We also keep up the bible study and discussions.

The other week, I saw her cross herself during Liturgy and almost fell over. I was not prepared for that! (but overjoyed!)



Here's a link your wife may like (disregard if repeat):

http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/

Many years!!

Thank you very much. I believe I have shown it to her some time ago, but I think that was when we first started going. I think it is worth another visit.

This is the church that is closest to her house in Japan. We plan to attend during our annual summer trip this June:
http://www.orthodoxjapan.jp/annai/n-osaka.html



St Nicholas of Japan worked tirelessly to found the Church of Japan.

    O holy Saint Nicholas, the Enlightener of Japan,
    You share the dignity and the throne of the Apostles:
    You are a wise and faithful servant of Christ,
    A temple chosen by the Divine Spirit,
    A vessel overflowing with the love of Christ.
    O hierarch equal to the Apostles,
    Pray to the life-creating Trinity
    For all your flock and for the whole world.

http://orthodoxwiki.org/Nicholas_of_Japan

Amen!
Logged
mountainman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: orthodox
Jurisdiction: oca
Posts: 65


« Reply #49 on: March 15, 2012, 06:17:05 AM »

I too am a former RC and even attended catholic school through grade 12.  I also found the RC Church to be too legalistic.  But the catholic parishioners are so very pious and their love for God so great!  This I have also found within orthodoxy.  When it comes right down to it, though, I have not doubt that my place is in orthodoxy.  I've been attending services in the Orthodox Church for about a year and have found that the faith provides me with a pathway to God like no other church has.  I have become more humble, have started a prayer rule, and feel more connected to God than ever before.  I plan to be chrismated soon and got over my "catholic guilt" a long time ago.  And I do indeed understand why it's so hard to make the decision to leave the Catholic Church.  My advice to you would be to continue to attend the divine liturgy and also some of the other services, especially during Lent.   And, if it helps, remember that the Catholic Church actually allows it's members to fulfill their Sunday obligation by attending an Eastern Orthodox divine liturgy.  Just take your time like I have and you'll find out where you need to be.  Good luck and may God bless you!

+1
Logged
Peter J
Formerly PJ
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Melkite
Posts: 6,114



« Reply #50 on: March 15, 2012, 10:04:01 AM »

And I do indeed understand why it's so hard to make the decision to leave the Catholic Church.    

Nice to see that there are still some people who understand that. Smiley
Logged

- Peter Jericho (a CAF poster)
JamesR
Virginal Chicano Blood
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: On-n-Off
Jurisdiction: OCA (the only truly Canonical American Orthodox Church)
Posts: 5,561


St. Augustine of Hippo pray for me!


« Reply #51 on: March 17, 2012, 02:30:21 AM »

History is what won me over. The moment I discovered that Rome instigated the schism by laying the Bull of Exocommunication I knew right then and there that Orthodoxy was the way to go and that rather than us being in schism from the Catholic Church, they separated themselves from the Catholic Church, which is us. I know that a lot of people are going to suggest taking months to think about this and everything, but to be honest, I converted very quickly. I do not know about most people here, but I place a very large importance to history. I know that Jesus said He would protect His Church through all the ages, and He sent His apostles to establish it, so upon finding out that Orthodoxy was the true historical Church that did not instigate schism, I decided to convert right then and there. Every doctrine and teaching in Orthodoxy I have had to learn from square one because I knew nothing about what Orthodoxy taught. I accepted and still do accept these teachings based off of my trust in Jesus' promise, which was confirmed through history. I thought that if Jesus said He would protect His Church forever, and I was entirely sure that Orthodoxy was the true Church, then Jesus would not allow the Orthodox Church to officially adopt a false dogma. Therefore, all of the teachings must have been correct. This won me over, and although to many existentialists who would have rather done more research and 'felt' Orthodoxy through attending the services for a few years before making a decision, I made my decision very quickly and I do not regret it at all. As a lawyer, I'm sure that you know that reason is the most is the most important factor in decision making. Now, if you are aware of the fact that Rome instigated the schism, then you should not be afraid of leaving Rome because they are not really the Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church after all, rather, they broke off from it. Come to Orthodoxy; you will love it.

EDIT:

I really must commend the OP and all of the Roman Catholic converts on this forum for coming to Orthodoxy. That must be pretty brave to leave the Roman Catholic Church out of faith to pursue God. I honestly cannot relate to that because I came from a Protestant background and Protestants usually really have no organization or formalization of the Church and doctrines; they all believe different things and people Church-hop to different Churches every week like it is nothing, so it is really hard to get attached to one like in Roman Catholicism.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 02:33:47 AM by JamesR » Logged

Quote
You're really on to something here. Tattoo to keep you from masturbating, chew to keep you from fornicating... it's a whole new world where you outsource your crosses. You're like a Christian entrepreneur or something.
Quote
James, you have problemz.
militantsparrow
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 626


militantsparrow
« Reply #52 on: March 17, 2012, 08:55:03 AM »

I was Roman Catholic as well. I'm now an Orthodox catechumen. I studied and struggled to discern for 3 years. It wasn't until after I stopped trying to reason out a definitive answer that the decision came to me. My wife asked me some simple questions about the things that really matter--things I had been taking for granted. Things like the sacraments and the liturgy.
Logged

"Yeah, the sparrow hath found an house..." -Psalm 84:3
Sauron
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
Posts: 844


« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2012, 10:32:33 PM »

Well, it looks like next Tuesday will be my kids' lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I will be accepted by chrismation.

In getting sure I had everything in order, I asked if I needed to be confessed prior to being chrismated, but was told I would not. Is the idea that the chrismation effects my infant Roman baptism and therefore confers the absolution?

Logged
Ortho_cat
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: AOCA-DWMA
Posts: 5,392



« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2012, 10:37:17 PM »

Well, it looks like next Tuesday will be my kids' lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I will be accepted by chrismation.

In getting sure I had everything in order, I asked if I needed to be confessed prior to being chrismated, but was told I would not. Is the idea that the chrismation effects my infant Roman baptism and therefore confers the absolution?



my priest heard my confession before chrismation, and he gave me the absolution during the chrismation rite.
Logged
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,483



« Reply #55 on: March 23, 2012, 11:02:41 PM »

Well, it looks like next Tuesday will be my kids' lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I will be accepted by chrismation.

In getting sure I had everything in order, I asked if I needed to be confessed prior to being chrismated, but was told I would not. Is the idea that the chrismation effects my infant Roman baptism and therefore confers the absolution?
Many years!

Yes, there are prayers of absolution in the rite of chrismation, and to supply what is lacking in the prior baptism.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Punch
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Body of Christ
Posts: 5,304



« Reply #56 on: March 24, 2012, 01:04:26 PM »

And I do indeed understand why it's so hard to make the decision to leave the Catholic Church.    

Nice to see that there are still some people who understand that. Smiley

I am a former Lutheran, and I can also understand why it is so difficult to make the decision to leave the Roman Church.  Even Luther did not want to do so.
Logged

Orthodox only because of God and His Russians.
peteprint
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 704



« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2012, 02:31:56 PM »

Well, it looks like next Tuesday will be my kids' lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I will be accepted by chrismation.

In getting sure I had everything in order, I asked if I needed to be confessed prior to being chrismated, but was told I would not. Is the idea that the chrismation effects my infant Roman baptism and therefore confers the absolution?



May God grant you and your family many years.  Congratulations!
Logged
Sauron
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
Posts: 844


« Reply #58 on: March 27, 2012, 11:06:05 PM »

Today was my children's lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I was accepted by chrismation. Our first communion will be on Sunday.

My son (age 7) reported, "that was awesome!" as I dried him off to change into his new clothes. He paid close attention during the ceremony and was able to answer for himself on most questions. My daughter (age 4) did very well also, although I think it was all a bit above her head. She loves her cross, though!

Mostly, my thoughts were with my children. While I am very happy to be chrismated, I do not think it is going to sink in until communion on Sunday. I have not communed for almost two years, and I was in an ICU at that time.

Logged
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,416



WWW
« Reply #59 on: March 27, 2012, 11:14:06 PM »

Today was my children's lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I was accepted by chrismation. Our first communion will be on Sunday.

My son (age 7) reported, "that was awesome!" as I dried him off to change into his new clothes. He paid close attention during the ceremony and was able to answer for himself on most questions. My daughter (age 4) did very well also, although I think it was all a bit above her head. She loves her cross, though!

Mostly, my thoughts were with my children. While I am very happy to be chrismated, I do not think it is going to sink in until communion on Sunday. I have not communed for almost two years, and I was in an ICU at that time.



Many years!
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
akimori makoto
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Non-heretical Christian
Jurisdiction: Fully-sik-hektic archdiocese of Australia, bro
Posts: 3,126

No-one bound by fleshly pleasures is worthy ...


« Reply #60 on: March 27, 2012, 11:20:32 PM »

Today was my children's lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I was accepted by chrismation. Our first communion will be on Sunday.

My son (age 7) reported, "that was awesome!" as I dried him off to change into his new clothes. He paid close attention during the ceremony and was able to answer for himself on most questions. My daughter (age 4) did very well also, although I think it was all a bit above her head. She loves her cross, though!

Mostly, my thoughts were with my children. While I am very happy to be chrismated, I do not think it is going to sink in until communion on Sunday. I have not communed for almost two years, and I was in an ICU at that time.



God grant you and your family many years, brother!
Logged

The Episcopallian road is easy and wide, for many go through it to find destruction. lol sorry channeling Isa.
NicholasMyra
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian/Greek
Posts: 5,853


Avowed denominationalist


« Reply #61 on: March 28, 2012, 12:54:17 AM »

Many years.
Logged

Quote from: Orthonorm
if Christ does and says x. And someone else does and says not x and you are ever in doubt, follow Christ.

"You are philosophical innovators. As for me, I follow the Fathers." -Every heresiarch ever
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Faith: Agnostic
Posts: 29,581



« Reply #62 on: March 28, 2012, 12:58:47 AM »

Many years, and congrats! Smiley
Logged
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #63 on: March 28, 2012, 04:39:49 AM »

Many years!
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
JR
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: No idea
Jurisdiction: Athens
Posts: 381



« Reply #64 on: March 28, 2012, 05:35:48 AM »

Congratulations and many years  Smiley
Logged

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them".

Mother Teresa
Ioannis Climacus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 863


"There is no religion higher than TRUTH"


« Reply #65 on: March 29, 2012, 09:36:54 PM »

Many years!
Logged

Note : Many of my posts (especially the ones antedating late 2012) do not reflect charity, tact, or even views I presently hold. Please forgive me for any antagonism I have caused.
Tgebar
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antioch
Posts: 84


This is the edge now, it's all we're living for.


« Reply #66 on: April 02, 2012, 09:29:06 AM »

History is what won me over. The moment I discovered that Rome instigated the schism by laying the Bull of Exocommunication I knew right then and there that Orthodoxy was the way to go and that rather than us being in schism from the Catholic Church, they separated themselves from the Catholic Church, which is us. I know that a lot of people are going to suggest taking months to think about this and everything, but to be honest, I converted very quickly. I do not know about most people here, but I place a very large importance to history. I know that Jesus said He would protect His Church through all the ages, and He sent His apostles to establish it, so upon finding out that Orthodoxy was the true historical Church that did not instigate schism, I decided to convert right then and there. Every doctrine and teaching in Orthodoxy I have had to learn from square one because I knew nothing about what Orthodoxy taught. I accepted and still do accept these teachings based off of my trust in Jesus' promise, which was confirmed through history. I thought that if Jesus said He would protect His Church forever, and I was entirely sure that Orthodoxy was the true Church, then Jesus would not allow the Orthodox Church to officially adopt a false dogma. Therefore, all of the teachings must have been correct. This won me over, and although to many existentialists who would have rather done more research and 'felt' Orthodoxy through attending the services for a few years before making a decision, I made my decision very quickly and I do not regret it at all. As a lawyer, I'm sure that you know that reason is the most is the most important factor in decision making. Now, if you are aware of the fact that Rome instigated the schism, then you should not be afraid of leaving Rome because they are not really the Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church after all, rather, they broke off from it. Come to Orthodoxy; you will love it.

EDIT:

I really must commend the OP and all of the Roman Catholic converts on this forum for coming to Orthodoxy. That must be pretty brave to leave the Roman Catholic Church out of faith to pursue God. I honestly cannot relate to that because I came from a Protestant background and Protestants usually really have no organization or formalization of the Church and doctrines; they all believe different things and people Church-hop to different Churches every week like it is nothing, so it is really hard to get attached to one like in Roman Catholicism.

I don't think the issue is that black and white; there's a reason we have the term 'Byzantine politics'. Now, this isn't an admonition against converting to the Orthodox Faith, I just think it's a bit historically inaccurate to pretend that there was no petty infighting and political bickering on the part of the Byzantine Empire and the Orthodox Church that lent itself to the schism as much so as, or at the very least somewhat less so than the Roman Church.
Logged

Smiley
mabsoota
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 2,470


Kyrie eleison


« Reply #67 on: April 02, 2012, 09:34:30 AM »

may God bless yr family and give u many years.
 Smiley
Logged
Ioannis Climacus
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 863


"There is no religion higher than TRUTH"


« Reply #68 on: April 07, 2012, 03:53:23 AM »

I don't think the issue is that black and white; there's a reason we have the term 'Byzantine politics'. Now, this isn't an admonition against converting to the Orthodox Faith, I just think it's a bit historically inaccurate to pretend that there was no petty infighting and political bickering on the part of the Byzantine Empire and the Orthodox Church that lent itself to the schism as much so as, or at the very least somewhat less so than the Roman Church.
If you have a little free time, you should check out this article by Fr. John Romanides. It is a very good read and, in my opinion, presents a much fairer analysis than most western history books.

http://www.romanity.org/htm/rom.03.en.franks_romans_feudalism_and_doctrine.01.htm
Logged

Note : Many of my posts (especially the ones antedating late 2012) do not reflect charity, tact, or even views I presently hold. Please forgive me for any antagonism I have caused.
Tgebar
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antioch
Posts: 84


This is the edge now, it's all we're living for.


« Reply #69 on: April 08, 2012, 02:48:41 PM »

Ioannis, you dog you, you know just the kind of long-winded sort of documents I love to bury myself in! Thank you! And I'm being honest when I say my sentiment is sincere.  Smiley
Logged

Smiley
xariskai
юродивый/yurodivy
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 1,340


יהוה עזי ומגני


« Reply #70 on: April 08, 2012, 04:04:29 PM »

Congratulations to you and your family, and many years!
Logged

Silly Stars
biro
Excelsior
Site Supporter
Warned
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox
Posts: 13,104


Και κλήρονομον δείξον με, ζωής της αιωνίου

fleem
WWW
« Reply #71 on: April 08, 2012, 07:38:35 PM »

Today was my children's lucky day to be baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. I was accepted by chrismation. Our first communion will be on Sunday.

My son (age 7) reported, "that was awesome!" as I dried him off to change into his new clothes. He paid close attention during the ceremony and was able to answer for himself on most questions. My daughter (age 4) did very well also, although I think it was all a bit above her head. She loves her cross, though!


Thanks be to God. Congratulations.  angel
Logged

Charlie Rose: If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be?

Fran Lebowitz: Everything. There is not one thing with which I am satisfied.

http://spcasuncoast.org/
Tags: catholic  convert 
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.128 seconds with 53 queries.