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Author Topic: Catholic Serbs  (Read 1543 times) Average Rating: 0
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romanbyzantium
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« on: May 13, 2004, 07:33:15 PM »

Are there any catholic serbs?
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Elisha
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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2004, 07:38:54 PM »

I'm sure there are.  Try Google for starters.  We wouldn't know much - we're not Roman Catholic.   Smiley
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romanbyzantium
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2004, 07:39:42 PM »

I'm sure there are.  Try Google for starters.  We wouldn't know much - we're not Roman Catholic.   Smiley

if there were any catholic serbs they would not be roman catholic.
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Mor Ephrem
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2004, 07:43:47 PM »

Why not?
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romanbyzantium
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2004, 07:48:34 PM »

Why not?  

Sorry... I meant to add " not necessarily"

As a sidenote, I have been reading up on serbia and its history. I looked at the online catholic encyclopedia and I came across the following entry. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13732a.htm

At various times during the first centuries of their history they were obliged to acknowledge the supremacy either of the Eastern Empire or of the Bulgarians. For short periods also they were able to maintain their independence. They accepted Latin Christianity in the eighth century, during the period of Bulgarian suzerainty. Until the union of Servia with the Greek Orthodox Church, the Servian Church was under the control of the Latin Archbishop of Spalato and, later, the Latin Archbishop of Antivari. After the death of the most powerful of the Bulgarian princes, Symeon (927), the Servian Zupan Cestaw was able, for the first time, to unite several Servian tribes against Peter, the weak ruler of the Bulgarians. However, the destruction of the Bulgarian kingdom by Basil II, Bulgaroktonos, the Byzantine emperor (976-1025), re-established Byzantine supremacy over the whole Balkan Peninsula. Although the oppressive sway of the Eastern Empire led to repeated revolts of the Serbs, the supremacy of Constantinople continued until the twelfth century. For a time indeed the Grand Zupan Michael (1050-80) was able to maintain his independence; he even received the title of king from Pope Gregory VII. In the twelfth century the family of the Nemanyich, to whom the union of the Serbs is due, became prominent in Servian history.
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« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2004, 09:33:18 PM »

Interesting excerpt.  Im curious as to what 'Zupan' means, since I know someone with that last name (not sure of his exact family history, but he's white and somewhat hippyish).
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ByzantineSerb
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« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2004, 10:11:58 PM »

Zupan, I believe, means like a head of a clan or family.
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2004, 03:04:43 AM »

I believe a large number of serbians just converted recently in Croatia to the catholic faith...but I have a feeling they did that to be accepted in there communities.

I am sure there are Serbs that are of all faiths........
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romanbyzantium
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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2004, 02:42:22 PM »

I believe a large number of serbians just converted recently in Croatia to the catholic faith...but I have a feeling they did that to be accepted in there communities.

I am sure there are Serbs that are of all faiths........

Really. where can I read that. do you have a link.
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« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2004, 07:49:15 AM »

Zhupan is an old title of sovereignty and means something like duke or prince, though I don't know if it can be translated with 100% accuracy. Stefan Nemanya was the Grand Zhupan who founded the first lasting Serbian state in the 12th century. He succeded in establishing sovereignty from the Byzantine Empire in 1185, if my memory serves me correctly. It's interesting that Nemanya was baptized in a Roman Catholic church and later became Orthodox. I would love to know more about why this happened, may try to ask why on a Serbian forum. Maybe some Serbs wer RC in his day, but Orthodoxy became the established faith and proper orthopraxis received encouragement from Nemanya's son St. Sava, who established the autocephalous Serbian church. Note that Nemanya himself eventually abdicated and became a monk under the name Simeon. His relics let forth myrrh and he is known as Sveti Simeon Mirotochivi (St. Symeon the Myrrh Gusher).

Later on, many of the Serbs who lived in Dalmatia were Roman Catholics, I am guessing because of their Venetian and/or Austrian overlords. Later, these Serbs were assimilated to the Croatian population and indeed much of Dalmatia is now part of Croatia, officially (it wasn't in the past, though). And during World War II, when Croatia was a Nazi puppet state, Serbs faced horrendous persecution there. They were mutilated and killed in such abominable conditions that the Germans were ashamed of it. Some Serbs formally converted to Roman Catholicism in face of this persecution. I think there were mass ceremonies when they would gather a lot of Serbs and bring priests to "convert" them. I don't know how many, if any Serbs did convert during the last wars, but as Croatia was ethnically cleansed of scores of Serbs, I don't know if there are many people remaining.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2004, 07:50:33 AM by erracht » Logged

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