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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 396627 times) Average Rating: 5
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« Reply #1935 on: September 25, 2011, 07:43:26 PM »

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

A lot of Gadamer? More than most people I would imagine. //:=)

Yes. Really Gadamer is just filling out Heidegger's understanding hermeneutics for the most part. I respect Gadamer a lot and could on about him forever.

Edith Stein, not so much, given her Thomistic turn. However she is one person in a line of many who, if people care about biography, show Heidegger out to be an @$$. Stein, Arendt, Celan . . . but not nearly the @$$ people want him to be.

Frankly I don't care much about biography as such and don't find it too informative in reading anything other than just more context and usually as meaningful as what I had for breakfast.

I wondered why you would have an interest in the above so looked into Edith Stein wikipage. I didn't realize how her life was lived out.

Lord have mercy on her.




I love Gadamer...I have his biography, but have not read it yet.  I also have the letters of Hannah Arendt and Karl Jaspers, also have not read them though plan to do so...sometime. 

Yes...Edith Stein's Thomistic turn was precisely what allowed her to "correct" Heidegger.

There are several 20th century minds that I cling to for some sort of sanity.

Edith is one of them.  Henri de Lubac another.  Bernard Lonnergan is another.  Thomas Langan another.  Jacques Maritan another.  Etienne Gilson another.  Jaques Barzun another.  Hannah Arendt another.  Joseph Ratzinger another.  Karol Wojtyla another.  Giles Emery another.  Slavoj Zizek and Jurgen Habermas to round things out.  Smiley....and Janet Flanner and Iris Murdock to give me a few laughs as a woman, and wonder at the odd things of the world.

Yipes.

Surprised to see Levinas missing.
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« Reply #1936 on: September 25, 2011, 07:50:16 PM »

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

A lot of Gadamer? More than most people I would imagine. //:=)

Yes. Really Gadamer is just filling out Heidegger's understanding hermeneutics for the most part. I respect Gadamer a lot and could on about him forever.

Edith Stein, not so much, given her Thomistic turn. However she is one person in a line of many who, if people care about biography, show Heidegger out to be an @$$. Stein, Arendt, Celan . . . but not nearly the @$$ people want him to be.

Frankly I don't care much about biography as such and don't find it too informative in reading anything other than just more context and usually as meaningful as what I had for breakfast.

I wondered why you would have an interest in the above so looked into Edith Stein wikipage. I didn't realize how her life was lived out.

Lord have mercy on her.




I love Gadamer...I have his biography, but have not read it yet.  I also have the letters of Hannah Arendt and Karl Jaspers, also have not read them though plan to do so...sometime. 

Yes...Edith Stein's Thomistic turn was precisely what allowed her to "correct" Heidegger.

There are several 20th century minds that I cling to for some sort of sanity.

Edith is one of them.  Henri de Lubac another.  Bernard Lonnergan is another.  Thomas Langan another.  Jacques Maritan another.  Etienne Gilson another.  Jaques Barzun another.  Hannah Arendt another.  Joseph Ratzinger another.  Karol Wojtyla another.  Giles Emery another.  Slavoj Zizek and Jurgen Habermas to round things out.  Smiley....and Janet Flanner and Iris Murdock to give me a few laughs as a woman, and wonder at the odd things of the world.

Yipes.

Surprised to see Levinas missing.

Nope.  Not Levinas, Bergson or Marion...You'll notice Husserl is not on the list either.  Nor Heidegger.

Remember I said they are there to keep me sane...and there are only so many hours in a day.   Cheesy
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« Reply #1937 on: September 26, 2011, 06:34:49 PM »

Got tired of just trudging through Heidegger, so I picked up two more books at the library today...

The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Plague, by Albert Camus

I'm already gleaning insights from the master...
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« Reply #1938 on: September 30, 2011, 11:47:07 AM »

Well, here are the books that I've read most recently:

The Hobbit
The Lord of the Rings
Diary of a City Priest by Fr. John McNamee
Soul of the Indian by Charles A. Eastman (aka Ohiyesa)

Diary of a City Priest is really great. Fr. John is a Catholic priest who serves an old parish in the inner city (which was formerly an Irish community). He talks about his struggles in helping the poor which really shows his life of self denial. I highly recommend it.

And I'm currently reading Black Elk Speaks by John Neihardt.


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« Reply #1939 on: September 30, 2011, 11:57:40 AM »

Got tired of just trudging through Heidegger, so I picked up two more books at the library today...

The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Plague, by Albert Camus

I'm already gleaning insights from the master...

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Camus sucks or blows. Can you do both at once?
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« Reply #1940 on: September 30, 2011, 12:02:31 PM »

Got tired of just trudging through Heidegger, so I picked up two more books at the library today...

The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Plague, by Albert Camus

I'm already gleaning insights from the master...

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Camus sucks or blows. Can you do both at once?

Yes, but not out of the same orifice.
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« Reply #1941 on: September 30, 2011, 12:04:37 PM »

Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks: An Epic Quest for Reality Among Role Players, Online Gamers, and Other Dwellers of Imaginary Realms by Ethan Gilsdorf.

If you every played D&D, you'll love this book. 
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« Reply #1942 on: September 30, 2011, 12:04:56 PM »

Got tired of just trudging through Heidegger, so I picked up two more books at the library today...

The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Plague, by Albert Camus

I'm already gleaning insights from the master...

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Camus sucks or blows. Can you do both at once?

Yes, but not out of the same orifice.


don't DO that when I am drinking something!!
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« Reply #1943 on: September 30, 2011, 01:08:56 PM »

Diary of a City Priest is really great. Fr. John is a Catholic priest who serves an old parish in the inner city (which was formerly an Irish community). He talks about his struggles in helping the poor which really shows his life of self denial. I highly recommend it.

That's interesting.  On another thread the topic of "Centering Prayer" is being discussed.  I first met Fr. John (the author of the book above) at a talk given by the Jesuit priest and Zen Roshi (yes you read that right  Shocked) Robbert Kennedy SJ at St. Joseph's Jesuit University in Philadelphia.  A Roman Catholic nun in Philadelphia, whose sister is a Maryknoll nun and also zen roshi in Japan, brought Fr. John to the talk and later she started a Centering Prayer/Christian Meditation group at his parish after she attended the group I was leading for a while in a church several miles from there (obviously, prior to my being received into the Orthodox Church). 
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« Reply #1944 on: September 30, 2011, 02:16:14 PM »

Diary of a City Priest is really great. Fr. John is a Catholic priest who serves an old parish in the inner city (which was formerly an Irish community). He talks about his struggles in helping the poor which really shows his life of self denial. I highly recommend it.

That's interesting.  On another thread the topic of "Centering Prayer" is being discussed.  I first met Fr. John (the author of the book above) at a talk given by the Jesuit priest and Zen Roshi (yes you read that right  Shocked) Robbert Kennedy SJ at St. Joseph's Jesuit University in Philadelphia.  A Roman Catholic nun in Philadelphia, whose sister is a Maryknoll nun and also zen roshi in Japan, brought Fr. John to the talk and later she started a Centering Prayer/Christian Meditation group at his parish after she attended the group I was leading for a while in a church several miles from there (obviously, prior to my being received into the Orthodox Church). 

Interesting. I'm guessing Fr. John was involved with the Zen meditation?
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« Reply #1945 on: September 30, 2011, 03:50:45 PM »

Diary of a City Priest is really great. Fr. John is a Catholic priest who serves an old parish in the inner city (which was formerly an Irish community). He talks about his struggles in helping the poor which really shows his life of self denial. I highly recommend it.

That's interesting.  On another thread the topic of "Centering Prayer" is being discussed.  I first met Fr. John (the author of the book above) at a talk given by the Jesuit priest and Zen Roshi (yes you read that right  Shocked) Robbert Kennedy SJ at St. Joseph's Jesuit University in Philadelphia.  A Roman Catholic nun in Philadelphia, whose sister is a Maryknoll nun and also zen roshi in Japan, brought Fr. John to the talk and later she started a Centering Prayer/Christian Meditation group at his parish after she attended the group I was leading for a while in a church several miles from there (obviously, prior to my being received into the Orthodox Church). 

Interesting. I'm guessing Fr. John was involved with the Zen meditation?

No, I don't think so.  From my impression he was interested, curious, and perhaps supportive of Roman Catholic participation in Zen and other such things, but I don’t think he personally had such a practice.  In his parish he allowed the Maryknoll nun/Zen Roshi to give a few talks on how RC’s can benefit from Zen, so he certainly wasn’t opposed to this, but that doesn’t mean that he was personally engaged in it either. 
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« Reply #1946 on: October 01, 2011, 01:05:43 AM »

Got tired of just trudging through Heidegger, so I picked up two more books at the library today...

The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Plague, by Albert Camus

I'm already gleaning insights from the master...

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Camus sucks or blows. Can you do both at once?

This reaction does not surprise me  Cheesy
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« Reply #1947 on: October 01, 2011, 04:08:00 AM »


And I'm currently reading Black Elk Speaks by John Neihardt.



One of my favorites!



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« Reply #1948 on: October 01, 2011, 11:40:38 AM »


And I'm currently reading Black Elk Speaks by John Neihardt.



One of my favorites!



Selam

The more I read it, the more easily its becoming one of mine.  Smiley
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« Reply #1949 on: October 01, 2011, 12:03:11 PM »

Joseph Margolis-The Flux of History and the Flux of Science

Michael Harrington-The Politics at God's Funeral
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« Reply #1950 on: October 01, 2011, 07:09:31 PM »

Joseph Margolis-The Flux of History and the Flux of Science

Michael Harrington-The Politics at God's Funeral
Someone once told me that in Norwegian "flux" is an impolite term for excreta. Since then I have to laugh when I see it a book title like that.
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« Reply #1951 on: October 01, 2011, 07:30:50 PM »

What I am reading:

-St. Athanasius' works (specifically: his first discourse against the Arians, then Contra Gentes, then I am going to re-read "On the Incarnation", and a few of his most important letters, etc.)
-St. Cyril's Third Book Against Theodore
-St. Severus' letters
-St. Philoxenus' letters

Then I'll be reading:

-Scholion On the Incarnation by St. Cyril
-The Apologies of St. Justin Martyr
-The Mystic Treatises of St. Isaac of Nineveh
-On Those Who Seek to Decry Images by John of Damascus
-The Minutes of the Council of Ephesus II presided over by St. Dioscorus (hopefully)
-The Ladder of Divine Ascent by St. John Climacus
-The Celestial Hierarchy by St. (Pseudo-) Dionysios the Areopagite
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« Reply #1952 on: October 01, 2011, 07:39:01 PM »

Joseph Margolis-The Flux of History and the Flux of Science

Michael Harrington-The Politics at God's Funeral
Someone once told me that in Norwegian "flux" is an impolite term for excreta. Since then I have to laugh when I see it a book title like that.

The flux is indeed an historical reference to dysentery.   I try not to think of it with that title but he makes it difficult!
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« Reply #1953 on: October 01, 2011, 07:42:04 PM »

The Life of Moses by St. Gregory of Nyssa.
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« Reply #1954 on: October 01, 2011, 07:45:45 PM »

The Life of Moses by St. Gregory of Nyssa.

The heartbeat of the Way of Perfection [the stages of the spiritual life and the prayer of union].
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« Reply #1955 on: October 02, 2011, 08:36:55 AM »

The Journals of Father Alexander Schmemann, 1973-1983
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« Reply #1956 on: October 02, 2011, 01:00:01 PM »

"The Ways of the Lord," by Archbishop Demetrios. Figured it's about time I got back to some reading on the faith.
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« Reply #1957 on: October 06, 2011, 01:06:30 AM »

The Ultimate Guide to Video Game Writing and Design, by Flint Dille and John Zuur Platten

Figured maybe it'd make me appreciate games more... or get me to pay more attention to them... or something...
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« Reply #1958 on: October 06, 2011, 12:09:45 PM »

Found this blog that has some very interesting books.  I think I'll read this one next:

http://easternorthodoxlibrarian.blogspot.com/2010/11/dragons-wine-and-angels-bread.html
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« Reply #1959 on: October 06, 2011, 12:41:20 PM »

Hey, thanks! That looks really cool!
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« Reply #1960 on: October 06, 2011, 01:05:57 PM »

I'm just reading small e-books about frugality right now because that thread put me to utter shame. However, I've been reading about it too much and still not controlling my shopping habits. I'm not doing a very good job. :-/
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« Reply #1961 on: October 07, 2011, 12:17:59 AM »

Dragon Age: The Calling, by David Gaider

One of the prequels to the Dragon Age game(s), with the events taking place about 16 years before Origins. I'm only about 30 pages in, but here's some things I've noticed so far:

- The map of Ferelden in the book is not exactly the same as the one in Origins (or the larger ones I've seen). Some differences I notice are: Redcliffe is in a slightly different location (it is on the western side of the lake, rather than at the south); there is an island shown at the northern end of Lake Calenhad, but it is not labeled as the location of the Circle of Magi; and Ostagar is not labeled/nowhere to be found.

- I don't know if Duncan changes over the course of the book, but his character is completely different so far as compared to how he is in Origins. Whereas in Origins he's highly respected by all who know him, well traveled, able to handle any situation just as it should be handled, etc., in the book so far he's impetuous, awkward, etc.  I suppose he could have changed in the 16 years in between, it just seems like such a huge difference. *shrugs*

- Teryn Loghain was always an a**hole. Not that there was much doubt, I suppose...
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« Reply #1962 on: October 12, 2011, 05:27:33 PM »

Dragon Age: The Stolen Throne, by David Gaider - The first prequel. Has been great reading. Or maybe I'm just a sucker for all thing Dragon Age  Grin Also, I simply can't read anything Loghain says in the book without hearing the actor's voice from Dragon Age: Origins.

Concise History of World Religions: An Illustrated Time Line, by National Geographic (ed. Tim Cooke) - Pretty pictures. Exotic religions.

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« Reply #1963 on: October 12, 2011, 06:36:20 PM »

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« Reply #1964 on: October 12, 2011, 06:42:21 PM »


Are you far enough along to talk about it a bit?
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« Reply #1965 on: October 12, 2011, 07:51:43 PM »

Way of a Pilgrim. Intriguing, bizarre, and creating an inexplicable urge within me to say the Jusus Prayer.
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« Reply #1966 on: October 12, 2011, 07:57:09 PM »

Way of a Pilgrim. Intriguing, bizarre, and creating an inexplicable urge within me to say the Jusus Prayer.

I think the above would have covered it better, no?  angel
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« Reply #1967 on: October 12, 2011, 09:25:54 PM »

*, are you in one of your attack modes?   police
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« Reply #1968 on: October 12, 2011, 09:45:19 PM »

*, are you in one of your attack modes?   police

Lol, why? Because I think you'd have to be 16 feet deep in a prelest pit to think Way of a Pilgrim is anywhere near normal or worthy of emulation?    police

Well, maybe I am in such a mode... *shrugs* attacking PRELEST! angel

Anyway... yeah... I guess motivation is one thing, and all well and good... just please don't anyone go trying to imitate the guy, mkay?  Grin
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« Reply #1969 on: October 13, 2011, 01:28:14 AM »

Has anyone else out there read The Cross of Iron?  Read that long ago.  Still one of my favorite books.
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« Reply #1970 on: October 13, 2011, 01:34:54 AM »

The Way Into the Kingdom of Heaven - St. Innocent of Alaska

Henry IV 1 & 2

Read these Sunday or Monday or something.
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« Reply #1971 on: October 13, 2011, 04:39:51 AM »

Nurses at the Front: Writing the Wounds of the Great War by Margaret R. Higonnet

It's a memoir collection.

I also recently finished There's a Devil in the Drum by John F. Lucy, an Irishman who fought for the Brits in WWI. As you can tell, these are for school but I do actually really "like" war memoirs, for lack of a more appropriate word.
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« Reply #1972 on: October 13, 2011, 12:21:26 PM »

*, are you in one of your attack modes?   police

Lol, why? Because I think you'd have to be 16 feet deep in a prelest pit to think Way of a Pilgrim is anywhere near normal or worthy of emulation?    police

Well, maybe I am in such a mode... *shrugs* attacking PRELEST! angel

Anyway... yeah... I guess motivation is one thing, and all well and good... just please don't anyone go trying to imitate the guy, mkay?  Grin

I could say worse *, if it would help take some of this heat off of you.

It is sorta like the book version of Ostrov, incredibly more saccharine though and with a greater time investment.

I've questioned the intelligence and literary taste of everyone who ranks this above Everyone Poops. Really this would be nice a intro to Orthodox Spirituality for toddlers.

I could easily reduce the entire story to a form that would fit into those "teething" picture books kids like chew on.

And of things written by a human, did this need a sequel?

But for those who want to LARP that they are a "simple" peasant going throughout their life achieving the prayer of the heart, I could not more heartily recommend this for their delusion.

 
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« Reply #1973 on: October 13, 2011, 03:15:20 PM »


Are you far enough along to talk about it a bit?
we can always use private messages  Grin
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« Reply #1974 on: October 13, 2011, 07:32:16 PM »


Are you far enough along to talk about it a bit?
we can always use private messages  Grin

'K...we could/should  But I am curious about that particular book.
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« Reply #1975 on: October 14, 2011, 03:20:20 AM »

*, are you in one of your attack modes?   police
Lol, why? Because I think you'd have to be 16 feet deep in a prelest pit to think Way of a Pilgrim is anywhere near normal or worthy of emulation?    police
Well, maybe I am in such a mode... *shrugs* attacking PRELEST! angel
Anyway... yeah... I guess motivation is one thing, and all well and good... just please don't anyone go trying to imitate the guy, mkay? Grin
I could say worse *, if it would help take some of this heat off of you.
It is sorta like the book version of Ostrov, incredibly more saccharine though and with a greater time investment.
I've questioned the intelligence and literary taste of everyone who ranks this above Everyone Poops. Really this would be nice a intro to Orthodox Spirituality for toddlers.
I could easily reduce the entire story to a form that would fit into those "teething" picture books kids like chew on.
And of things written by a human, did this need a sequel?
But for those who want to LARP that they are a "simple" peasant going throughout their life achieving the prayer of the heart, I could not more heartily recommend this for their delusion.

No heat.  The comment was in good fun, and I think it's a bit much to trash a widely read Orthodox work that someone mentions reading and enjoying. 

Rufus said the book inspired him to pray.  What's the problem with that?  He didn't say he strapped on his peasant tape shoe things to go LARPing.  I admit the book could be problematic (and I personally think Dostoyevsky's Demons is a nice companion work to temper its sentimentality), but he got something, hopefully not 'prelesty' from it.  Not everything has to be complex, riveting, and stunningly well formulated to be worthwhile.  Think of the story of the monk who 'ignantly' prayed to "St. Annunciation" and his prayers were answered.  Certainly ridiculous, definitely stupid.  'Prelesty'? Not really.  Inspiring?  Perhaps.  Leave poor Mr. Pilgrim man and his peasant tape shoe things alone.
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« Reply #1976 on: October 14, 2011, 03:25:36 AM »

*, are you in one of your attack modes?   police
Lol, why? Because I think you'd have to be 16 feet deep in a prelest pit to think Way of a Pilgrim is anywhere near normal or worthy of emulation?    police
Well, maybe I am in such a mode... *shrugs* attacking PRELEST! angel
Anyway... yeah... I guess motivation is one thing, and all well and good... just please don't anyone go trying to imitate the guy, mkay? Grin
I could say worse *, if it would help take some of this heat off of you.
It is sorta like the book version of Ostrov, incredibly more saccharine though and with a greater time investment.
I've questioned the intelligence and literary taste of everyone who ranks this above Everyone Poops. Really this would be nice a intro to Orthodox Spirituality for toddlers.
I could easily reduce the entire story to a form that would fit into those "teething" picture books kids like chew on.
And of things written by a human, did this need a sequel?
But for those who want to LARP that they are a "simple" peasant going throughout their life achieving the prayer of the heart, I could not more heartily recommend this for their delusion.

No heat.  The comment was in good fun, and I think it's a bit much to trash a widely read Orthodox work that someone mentions reading and enjoying. 

Rufus said the book inspired him to pray.  What's the problem with that?  He didn't say he strapped on his peasant tape shoe things to go LARPing.  I admit the book could be problematic (and I personally think Dostoyevsky's Demons is a nice companion work to temper its sentimentality), but he got something, hopefully not 'prelesty' from it.  Not everything has to be complex, riveting, and stunningly well formulated to be worthwhile.  Think of the story of the monk who 'ignantly' prayed to "St. Annunciation" and his prayers were answered.  Certainly ridiculous, definitely stupid.  'Prelesty'? Not really.  Inspiring?  Perhaps.  Leave poor Mr. Pilgrim man and his peasant tape shoe things alone.

Who is Rufus?

Is this thing actually a trilogy?
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« Reply #1977 on: October 14, 2011, 03:35:21 AM »

Who is Rufus?

Is this thing actually a trilogy?

Heh, he's the poster who mentioned recently reading Way of the Pilgrim.

I don't think it's a trilogy.  As far as I know, just that odd continuation bit at the end.
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« Reply #1978 on: October 14, 2011, 08:30:24 AM »

Who is Rufus?

Is this thing actually a trilogy?

Heh, he's the poster who mentioned recently reading Way of the Pilgrim.

I don't think it's a trilogy.  As far as I know, just that odd continuation bit at the end.

I thought Rufus might be part of some prequel or sequel. I dunno.
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« Reply #1979 on: October 14, 2011, 12:26:23 PM »

Well, aside from philosophy text books for school, I am reading:









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