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Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4725 on: October 31, 2015, 01:25:01 PM »
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4726 on: November 19, 2015, 06:32:23 AM »


I went through 100 pages of it in a couple of hours yesterday, while riding or waiting around for the bus, which is crazy fast for me. Its readability is as extreme as its interest.
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4727 on: November 19, 2015, 12:33:03 PM »
On a daily basis the Bible. More precisely the Proverbs and Sirach, and Psalms.

Dao de jing - A philosophical translation
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I thought the introduction was well written and rather persuasive why a new translation is necessary. My first time reading this.
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Offline biro

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4728 on: November 19, 2015, 12:43:28 PM »
"The Circle," Bernard Minier. Just started.
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4729 on: November 19, 2015, 05:44:27 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
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Offline TheTrisagion

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4730 on: November 19, 2015, 05:46:17 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)
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Offline Theophania

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4731 on: November 19, 2015, 05:49:20 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Well, it's a big one.

I hope it was the Peavear and Volokhonsky (sp?) translation. I've read their translations of Anna Karenina and War and Peace and they are beautiful.
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Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4732 on: November 19, 2015, 05:55:34 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Well, it's a big one.

I hope it was the Peavear and Volokhonsky (sp?) translation. I've read their translations of Anna Karenina and War and Peace and they are beautiful.

I never read their Tolstoy.  Maybe I should do that, it's been awhile since I read Tolstoy. I've read a lot of their Dostoyevsky,  Gogol, and Checkov.  They are great, and I think they're a good Orthodox boy and girl.  I remember looking to see if they did Pushkin, unfortunately they don't (I read Nabokovs translation, it's suprisingly horrible).
« Last Edit: November 19, 2015, 05:57:25 PM by William T »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4733 on: November 19, 2015, 06:23:13 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Well, it's a big one.

I hope it was the Peavear and Volokhonsky (sp?) translation. I've read their translations of Anna Karenina and War and Peace and they are beautiful.

I never read their Tolstoy.  Maybe I should do that, it's been awhile since I read Tolstoy. I've read a lot of their Dostoyevsky,  Gogol, and Checkov.  They are great, and I think they're a good Orthodox boy and girl.  I remember looking to see if they did Pushkin, unfortunately they don't (I read Nabokovs translation, it's suprisingly horrible).
Man I love Pevear's rendering of TBK. It's direct, "hard-hitting", and above all gripping. I couldn't put it down.

Now C&P on the other hand was terrible. Maybe I'll try it again to see what's so great, but man trudging through that middle section of Raskolnikov basically moping around on a couch was so boring. Although how the opening unfolded was pretty exciting before it ended abruptly in this boring meditation on the internalization of his "guilt".
"The business of the Christian is nothing else than to be ever preparing for death (μελεπᾷν ἀποθνήσκειν)."

— Saint Irenaeus of Lyons, Fragment XI

Modernist thinking and being consists of nothing but uncritical acceptance.

Offline Timon

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4734 on: November 19, 2015, 06:27:01 PM »
The Brothers Karamasov
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4735 on: November 19, 2015, 06:32:54 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Ah, well yes, hopefully he is done by now.  Thanks for pointing that out.   :D

As for Dostoevsky - I prefer him to Tolstoy - love them both.  Also Chekov is another great one.  His short stories are really beautiful.  Constance Garnett is one of the best translators to English for Russian literature.  Anything translated by her is quite good.
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Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4736 on: November 19, 2015, 07:02:53 PM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Well, it's a big one.

I hope it was the Peavear and Volokhonsky (sp?) translation. I've read their translations of Anna Karenina and War and Peace and they are beautiful.

I never read their Tolstoy.  Maybe I should do that, it's been awhile since I read Tolstoy. I've read a lot of their Dostoyevsky,  Gogol, and Checkov.  They are great, and I think they're a good Orthodox boy and girl.  I remember looking to see if they did Pushkin, unfortunately they don't (I read Nabokovs translation, it's suprisingly horrible).
Man I love Pevear's rendering of TBK. It's direct, "hard-hitting", and above all gripping. I couldn't put it down.

Now C&P on the other hand was terrible. Maybe I'll try it again to see what's so great, but man trudging through that middle section of Raskolnikov basically moping around on a couch was so boring. Although how the opening unfolded was pretty exciting before it ended abruptly in this boring meditation on the internalization of his "guilt".

Uhh yeah CP is Dostoyevsky at his worst.  I read it once and will not read it again.  I was  talking about translation versions though.  For example, Demons is way better than the Penguin translation.  When I found P&V translations, it made me reread a few books I already read, but I guess if you can, any book worth reading should be read more than once..so finding those translations helped me read some books twice.

TBK is his best novel though.  I like Demons more, and there are some short stories I prefer, but TBK is his best by far.  And yeah the PV version is waaay more "visceral" than the Penguin version.

If you ever have the time check out the Richard Lattimore version of the Gospel.  It has a "visceral" , hard hitting, and direct quality to it.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2015, 07:22:43 PM by William T »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4737 on: November 19, 2015, 08:25:30 PM »
If you ever have the time check out the Richard Lattimore version of the Gospel.  It has a "visceral" , hard hitting, and direct quality to it.
Will do, thanks for the recommendation.
"The business of the Christian is nothing else than to be ever preparing for death (μελεπᾷν ἀποθνήσκειν)."

— Saint Irenaeus of Lyons, Fragment XI

Modernist thinking and being consists of nothing but uncritical acceptance.

Offline Timon

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4738 on: November 20, 2015, 08:59:48 AM »
Anna Karenina

Lucky you - that is my favorite novel of all time.
I hope he is done with it by now!  ;)

Well, it's a big one.

I hope it was the Peavear and Volokhonsky (sp?) translation. I've read their translations of Anna Karenina and War and Peace and they are beautiful.

I never read their Tolstoy.  Maybe I should do that, it's been awhile since I read Tolstoy. I've read a lot of their Dostoyevsky,  Gogol, and Checkov.  They are great, and I think they're a good Orthodox boy and girl.  I remember looking to see if they did Pushkin, unfortunately they don't (I read Nabokovs translation, it's suprisingly horrible).
Man I love Pevear's rendering of TBK. It's direct, "hard-hitting", and above all gripping. I couldn't put it down.

Now C&P on the other hand was terrible. Maybe I'll try it again to see what's so great, but man trudging through that middle section of Raskolnikov basically moping around on a couch was so boring. Although how the opening unfolded was pretty exciting before it ended abruptly in this boring meditation on the internalization of his "guilt".

Uhh yeah CP is Dostoyevsky at his worst.  I read it once and will not read it again.  I was  talking about translation versions though.  For example, Demons is way better than the Penguin translation.  When I found P&V translations, it made me reread a few books I already read, but I guess if you can, any book worth reading should be read more than once..so finding those translations helped me read some books twice.

TBK is his best novel though.  I like Demons more, and there are some short stories I prefer, but TBK is his best by far.  And yeah the PV version is waaay more "visceral" than the Penguin version.

If you ever have the time check out the Richard Lattimore version of the Gospel.  It has a "visceral" , hard hitting, and direct quality to it.

Is anyone familiar with the MacAndrew translation of TBK featured in the Bantam Classics edition? Thats the one I am currently reading, and I must say, I REALLY like it.

TBK was on my list, and I found it used for $2 at a bookstore. I was planning to read the P&V translation as I hear that its the most accurate, but picked this up as it was all they had. I did a quick google search to see what the general opinion is of the MacAndrew translation and most folks really like it because of it's readability. It is very easy to read and understand. I dont know if that means it sacrifices some of its translation accuracy, but I knew for me to get through a 1000 page book that readability would be important!

Anyways, I recommend it.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2015, 09:00:10 AM by Timon »
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Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4739 on: November 20, 2015, 02:41:58 PM »
Yes, I've read the MacAndrew version of TBK.  It is very readable.  I personally think too much is made of who is translating.  There is nothing wrong with Constance Garnett - though some make a huge fuss about her.  It is unfounded.  Her work is accurate and very well done.  The main point is just to read the book, whatever fairly reputable translation you prefer.  They are not THAT different. 

All Dostoevsky books are uneven - he has highs and lows and he does ramble on.  Tolstoy was a better novelist - particularly AK.  (War and Peace goes very boring for me in many spots.)  AK to me anyway is the world's best novel - structure, content, characters - as a work of art.  Dostoevsky is never that polished or structured. 

C&P is a great, great novel - the murder and the cat and mouse game with the prosecutor is brilliant.  I like the guilt driving Raskolnikov to distraction and think it is very effectively done.  He sets out to eliminate a cruel useless old woman and use her money for good - but learns that such a rational justification for her death is pointless. (and of course he kills Lizaveta too)  He has committed a crime, a sin before God.  Slowly he goes back to faith.  Sadly, that is the weakest part of the book for me.    Sonia seems just pathetic and weak - nothing particularly inspiring about her faith or her love for Rasolnikov.  His "conversion" is unconvincing, mechanical.  That is the odd thing about Dostoevsky - his atheists are always much more gripping inspiring characters than his Christians.  (except maybe Aloysha in spots though I prefer Mitya and Ivan to be honest)

The Idiot is another great one - again good and bad (or slow) parts.  TBK is the far and away the best.  Also like the Devils.  Notes from Underground is a must (1st part).  Tolstoy can't touch it.   ;)
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Offline Timon

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4740 on: November 23, 2015, 08:23:34 AM »
Yes, I've read the MacAndrew version of TBK.  It is very readable.  I personally think too much is made of who is translating.  There is nothing wrong with Constance Garnett - though some make a huge fuss about her.  It is unfounded.  Her work is accurate and very well done.  The main point is just to read the book, whatever fairly reputable translation you prefer.  They are not THAT different. 

All Dostoevsky books are uneven - he has highs and lows and he does ramble on.  Tolstoy was a better novelist - particularly AK.  (War and Peace goes very boring for me in many spots.)  AK to me anyway is the world's best novel - structure, content, characters - as a work of art.  Dostoevsky is never that polished or structured. 

C&P is a great, great novel - the murder and the cat and mouse game with the prosecutor is brilliant.  I like the guilt driving Raskolnikov to distraction and think it is very effectively done.  He sets out to eliminate a cruel useless old woman and use her money for good - but learns that such a rational justification for her death is pointless. (and of course he kills Lizaveta too)  He has committed a crime, a sin before God.  Slowly he goes back to faith.  Sadly, that is the weakest part of the book for me.    Sonia seems just pathetic and weak - nothing particularly inspiring about her faith or her love for Rasolnikov.  His "conversion" is unconvincing, mechanical.  That is the odd thing about Dostoevsky - his atheists are always much more gripping inspiring characters than his Christians.  (except maybe Aloysha in spots though I prefer Mitya and Ivan to be honest)

The Idiot is another great one - again good and bad (or slow) parts.  TBK is the far and away the best.  Also like the Devils.  Notes from Underground is a must (1st part).  Tolstoy can't touch it.   ;)

I have just recently tapped into Russian literature. Or really, just literature in general. I was never a big reader growing up and have just really began to read consistently over the last couple years.

So far ive only read Notes From The Underground and the first 300 pages of TBK. Love both. The first part of Notes was difficult for me to understand. He seriously seemed insane. The 2nd part was very enjoyable to me!

The thing about these old Russian guys who wrote insanely long novels is that I have to remember they are smarter than me. Their books are much smarter than me. Even when I am cruising merrily along with the readable MacAndrew translation of TBK, I know I am likely not grasping a majority of the themes, imagery, etc.

I'll keep trudging along for now though!
Even if we have thousands of acts of great virtue to our credit, our confidence in being heard must be based on God's mercy and His love for men. Even if we stand at the very summit of virtue, it is by mercy that we shall be saved.

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Offline Arachne

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4741 on: November 23, 2015, 09:20:04 AM »
Even more history.

'Evil isn't the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as evil, maybe more so, and it's a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against stupid. That might actually make a difference.'~Harry Dresden

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Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4742 on: November 23, 2015, 02:42:44 PM »
Yes, I've read the MacAndrew version of TBK.  It is very readable.  I personally think too much is made of who is translating.  There is nothing wrong with Constance Garnett - though some make a huge fuss about her.  It is unfounded.  Her work is accurate and very well done.  The main point is just to read the book, whatever fairly reputable translation you prefer.  They are not THAT different. 

All Dostoevsky books are uneven - he has highs and lows and he does ramble on.  Tolstoy was a better novelist - particularly AK.  (War and Peace goes very boring for me in many spots.)  AK to me anyway is the world's best novel - structure, content, characters - as a work of art.  Dostoevsky is never that polished or structured. 

C&P is a great, great novel - the murder and the cat and mouse game with the prosecutor is brilliant.  I like the guilt driving Raskolnikov to distraction and think it is very effectively done.  He sets out to eliminate a cruel useless old woman and use her money for good - but learns that such a rational justification for her death is pointless. (and of course he kills Lizaveta too)  He has committed a crime, a sin before God.  Slowly he goes back to faith.  Sadly, that is the weakest part of the book for me.    Sonia seems just pathetic and weak - nothing particularly inspiring about her faith or her love for Rasolnikov.  His "conversion" is unconvincing, mechanical.  That is the odd thing about Dostoevsky - his atheists are always much more gripping inspiring characters than his Christians.  (except maybe Aloysha in spots though I prefer Mitya and Ivan to be honest)

The Idiot is another great one - again good and bad (or slow) parts.  TBK is the far and away the best.  Also like the Devils.  Notes from Underground is a must (1st part).  Tolstoy can't touch it.   ;)

I have just recently tapped into Russian literature. Or really, just literature in general. I was never a big reader growing up and have just really began to read consistently over the last couple years.

So far ive only read Notes From The Underground and the first 300 pages of TBK. Love both. The first part of Notes was difficult for me to understand. He seriously seemed insane. The 2nd part was very enjoyable to me!

The thing about these old Russian guys who wrote insanely long novels is that I have to remember they are smarter than me. Their books are much smarter than me. Even when I am cruising merrily along with the readable MacAndrew translation of TBK, I know I am likely not grasping a majority of the themes, imagery, etc.

I'll keep trudging along for now though!

Good for you.  My dad was a French teacher and he pushed books pretty hard, so I had no choice - this included the Russians.  (I remember reading War & Peace when I was like 15 - Natasha at the ball.  Great stuff. )  It is definitely work and takes time - but there is a lot of beauty and wisdom you receive that you will not get off the Internet.  You'll never regret it.  Reputable biographies of authors are good too - they help a lot with themes, where the author is coming from.  I reread books over time too - much easier and more meaningful the second, third time.
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Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4743 on: November 23, 2015, 02:56:48 PM »
Yeah, I had books and poetry pushed on me hard as a kid.  That's why I tell people it's no big deal that I've read so much.  It's just a good habit that I was fortunate enough to be raised with.  Reading isn't really a big deal to me.

I read a lot of philosophy and academic theology on my own though.  Mostly out of spite.  That stuff is a whole different world, with a really strange breed of characters that can really tax my patience.  I don't have the temperment for that I guess.


Anyway, you are ultimately right about translation (though there are some notable exceptions).  It doesn't matter too much.  But if you know a great translation it really helps the experience. 
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 03:00:33 PM by William T »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4744 on: November 23, 2015, 03:05:27 PM »
I read a lot of philosophy and academic theology on my own though.  Mostly out of spite.  That stuff is a whole different world, with a really strange breed of characters that can really tax my patience.  I don't have the temperment for that I guess.
Mind if you share with us what you have read?
"The business of the Christian is nothing else than to be ever preparing for death (μελεπᾷν ἀποθνήσκειν)."

— Saint Irenaeus of Lyons, Fragment XI

Modernist thinking and being consists of nothing but uncritical acceptance.

Offline christiane777

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4745 on: November 23, 2015, 03:23:46 PM »
Yeah, I had books and poetry pushed on me hard as a kid.  That's why I tell people it's no big deal that I've read so much.  It's just a good habit that I was fortunate enough to be raised with.  Reading isn't really a big deal to me.

I read a lot of philosophy and academic theology on my own though.  Mostly out of spite.  That stuff is a whole different world, with a really strange breed of characters that can really tax my patience.  I don't have the temperment for that I guess.


Anyway, you are ultimately right about translation (though there are some notable exceptions).  It doesn't matter too much.  But if you know a great translation it really helps the experience.

Yes, I went through a very intense Nietszche period - I think read all of his stuff - lasted about 4 or 5 years.  Of course that was in my atheist days.  He left an impact, no doubt.  Kierkegaard, also, though he is insanely difficult to read.  I always have to read good books about him at the same time, just to make sure I am getting all the subjectivity, irony, the Hegel jabs, etc.  But I have gotten a lot out of him, no doubt. 

Another thing, philosophy and literature really train the mind and make the Church fathers quite an easy read.  Luther is fun to read - Aquinas is hard,  but you get a lot out of him.  Gregory of Nyssa.  The Bible of course - St. Paul is great stuff (and of course truth  :)).  Psalms, Proverbs, Job. 

I also want to put in a plug for Walden by Thoreau.  If anyone who is interested has not read Walden, please do.  It holds up very well and is pretty readable.  One of the most important American books of all time.  Thoreau is good for looking at life beyond the "American" way - what it means, how to live it.  A real treasure.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 03:24:14 PM by christiane777 »
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Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4746 on: November 23, 2015, 03:30:10 PM »
I read a lot of philosophy and academic theology on my own though.  Mostly out of spite.  That stuff is a whole different world, with a really strange breed of characters that can really tax my patience.  I don't have the temperment for that I guess.
Mind if you share with us what you have read?

That might not be appropriate.  It might be overwhelming or hard for me to just list things.

But,

For philosophy: I was went to Catholic high school and got a useless degree in Classic Studies for college...so I had some formal education with the Greeks and some scholastic stuff (mostly Aquinas).

After that it's probably safe to say that I at least read solid in depth, important chunks of all the major continental guys. I've also read some modern analytic stuff, both for school and a couple things on my own. There are some people I've read a lot of, some major people I've just read what I figured I needed to read. Once again, it would be a bit overwhelming (and it might come off as a bit eccentric) to really say anymore than this.

As for theology, not as much.  And as far as what I know, most of it is vogue for modern academic theologians...or at least the three I knew.  Anything I read there came from dialogue with them.

If you want anymore info you can ask about specifics or pm me, I'll be happy to answer.  But like I said, philosophy or theology are far from my thing.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 04:01:44 PM by William T »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4747 on: November 23, 2015, 04:03:21 PM »
the Hegel jabs, etc.
The opening of Part One in Sickness Unto Death is probably my favorite jab, it cracked me up when I first read it.
"The business of the Christian is nothing else than to be ever preparing for death (μελεπᾷν ἀποθνήσκειν)."

— Saint Irenaeus of Lyons, Fragment XI

Modernist thinking and being consists of nothing but uncritical acceptance.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4748 on: November 23, 2015, 10:41:14 PM »
And speaking of Huxley, this just came in the mail today! Can't wait to dig into it.  :)




Selam

This was excellent!


Selam
"Whether it’s the guillotine, the hangman’s noose, or reciprocal endeavors of militaristic horror, radical evil will never be recompensed with radical punishment. The only answer, the only remedy, and the only truly effective response to radical evil is radical love."
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Offline Luke

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4749 on: November 26, 2015, 01:59:56 AM »
History, tales, and sketches / Washington Irving.

Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4750 on: November 30, 2015, 08:47:09 PM »
Serge Schmemann: Echoes of a Native Land.

Just started reading it.  Seems promising.
Holy Toledo!

Offline Echa

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4751 on: December 04, 2015, 03:24:28 PM »
Hitlers Furiën - Wendy Lower
Христос възкресе! Наистина възкресе!

Offline sakura95

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4752 on: December 10, 2015, 10:18:07 PM »
I'm getting into Soren Kierkegaard recently.

Just started reading "Fear and Trembling" and "The Sickness Unto Death"(my uni's library just so happens to have a book with the two together which I borrowed)



My Lord, My Lord, give my worthless soul the illumination of Wisdom in your mercy

Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4753 on: December 11, 2015, 03:07:38 AM »
I'm getting into Soren Kierkegaard recently.

Just started reading "Fear and Trembling" and "The Sickness Unto Death"(my uni's library just so happens to have a book with the two together which I borrowed)

I love Kierkegaard.


Selam
"Whether it’s the guillotine, the hangman’s noose, or reciprocal endeavors of militaristic horror, radical evil will never be recompensed with radical punishment. The only answer, the only remedy, and the only truly effective response to radical evil is radical love."
+ Gebre Menfes Kidus +
http://bookstore.authorhouse.com/Products/SKU-000984270/Rebel-Song.aspx

Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4754 on: December 11, 2015, 03:29:35 AM »
Gebre do you like the pacifist Mennonite rapist theologian. He came up in passing the other day. what was his name? Yoder?

The Politics of Jesus I believe he wrote. I thought about you when he was brought up, because of the pacifist part, not the rapist part.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4755 on: December 11, 2015, 04:36:21 AM »
Gebre do you like the pacifist Mennonite rapist theologian. He came up in passing the other day. what was his name? Yoder?

The Politics of Jesus I believe he wrote. I thought about you when he was brought up, because of the pacifist part, not the rapist part.

I found "The Politics of Jesus" to be poorly written. I actually gave up trying to read it and sent it to a friend who liked it very much. He's much smarter than I am. But I loved Yoder's short book, "What Would You Do?" I frequently recommend it to those who attempt to refute pacifism with the specious arguments of situational ethics.

I've heard about the scandalous accusations, but I have no way of knowing if they are true. So I can't speak to that. But a straight line can be drawn with a crooked stick.

Selam
"Whether it’s the guillotine, the hangman’s noose, or reciprocal endeavors of militaristic horror, radical evil will never be recompensed with radical punishment. The only answer, the only remedy, and the only truly effective response to radical evil is radical love."
+ Gebre Menfes Kidus +
http://bookstore.authorhouse.com/Products/SKU-000984270/Rebel-Song.aspx

Offline sakura95

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4756 on: December 12, 2015, 02:12:06 PM »
I'm getting into Soren Kierkegaard recently.

Just started reading "Fear and Trembling" and "The Sickness Unto Death"(my uni's library just so happens to have a book with the two together which I borrowed)

I love Kierkegaard.


Selam

I can certainly agree with this. I have an affinity for his Existentialism and his portrayal of Faith as a struggle one goes through throughout his/her lifetime.
My Lord, My Lord, give my worthless soul the illumination of Wisdom in your mercy

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4757 on: December 12, 2015, 02:21:49 PM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Iconodule

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4758 on: December 12, 2015, 03:06:36 PM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.
Quote
“A goose to hatch the Crystal Egg after an Eagle had half-hatched it! Aye, aye, to be sure, that’s right,” said the Old Woman of Beare. “And now you must go find out what happened to it. Go now, and when you come back I will give you your name.”
- from The King of Ireland's Son, by Padraic Colum

Offline Iconodule

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4759 on: December 12, 2015, 03:07:07 PM »
Tess of the D'Urbervilles. I'm kicking myself for not reading this many years ago.
Quote
“A goose to hatch the Crystal Egg after an Eagle had half-hatched it! Aye, aye, to be sure, that’s right,” said the Old Woman of Beare. “And now you must go find out what happened to it. Go now, and when you come back I will give you your name.”
- from The King of Ireland's Son, by Padraic Colum

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4760 on: December 12, 2015, 03:53:58 PM »
Centuries of Meditations, by Thomas Traherne

Offline Porter ODoran

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4761 on: December 12, 2015, 04:08:55 PM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.

They would think they were, anyway. He is not without profoundness and subtlety.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline Theophania

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4762 on: December 12, 2015, 04:18:37 PM »
Just started "Recollections of Jerusalem" by Anya Derrick a couple days ago.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2015, 04:20:36 PM by kelly »
It's common knowledge that you secretly want to be born in early 17th century Russia.  As a serf or a royal, I know not.  Chances are serf.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4763 on: December 14, 2015, 05:50:27 AM »
The One and the Many: Studies on God, Man, the Church, and the World Today, by Met. John Zizioulas

Offline Iconodule

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4764 on: December 14, 2015, 11:22:08 AM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.

They would think they were, anyway. He is not without profoundness and subtlety.

Sure. That's part of what makes the "traditionalists" so seductive and creepy.
Quote
“A goose to hatch the Crystal Egg after an Eagle had half-hatched it! Aye, aye, to be sure, that’s right,” said the Old Woman of Beare. “And now you must go find out what happened to it. Go now, and when you come back I will give you your name.”
- from The King of Ireland's Son, by Padraic Colum

Offline Alxandra

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4765 on: December 14, 2015, 11:24:35 AM »
St Seraphim of Sarov :)
"And if the man is the head of the family then the woman is the heart, and this heart is made by God that He may find rest in it”
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Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4766 on: December 14, 2015, 11:31:28 AM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.

They would think they were, anyway. He is not without profoundness and subtlety.

Sure. That's part of what makes the "traditionalists" so seductive and creepy.

Anybody can critique large abstract structures and set up a pie in the sky and sound profound if they put the time into it.  That's the seduction, it's an old Jedi Mind Trick.  That's what cults do.

Anyway,

rereading Salammbrô by Flaubert.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 11:32:46 AM by William T »
Holy Toledo!

Offline Indocern

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4767 on: December 14, 2015, 11:35:05 AM »
St Seraphim of Sarov :)

Good choice. The Bible and Faith, Hope and Love.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 11:40:48 AM by Indocern »

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4768 on: December 14, 2015, 03:07:16 PM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.

They would think they were, anyway. He is not without profoundness and subtlety.

Sure. That's part of what makes the "traditionalists" so seductive and creepy.

Anybody can critique large abstract structures and set up a pie in the sky and sound profound if they put the time into it.  That's the seduction, it's an old Jedi Mind Trick.  That's what cults do.

Yet in no way an accurate description of Evola's philosophy.
"Love ... is an abyss of illumination, a mountain of fire ... . It is the condition of angels, the progress of eternity" (Climacus).

Quote from: Seekingtrue
Yes we who are far from sainthood we can recognize a living saint and I'm talking from personal experience.Yes they are gentle soo gentle it can not be described it is like gentleness and humility in one and also they have this light this energy it's beyond words...and when you are near them you feel ecstatic and very happy

Offline William T

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #4769 on: December 15, 2015, 09:41:03 PM »
Ride the Tiger, a book by Satan, or his servant Julius (Giulio) Evola, that I think Cyrillic would enjoy.

I think Byron or Charles Martel would be more into Evola, if they read books.

They would think they were, anyway. He is not without profoundness and subtlety.

Sure. That's part of what makes the "traditionalists" so seductive and creepy.

Anybody can critique large abstract structures and set up a pie in the sky and sound profound if they put the time into it.  That's the seduction, it's an old Jedi Mind Trick.  That's what cults do.

Yet in no way an accurate description of Evola's philosophy.

Well, Ive nevet read him.  I've only seen him used before, and that was good enough for me to gain disgust.  No doubt I can be hasty and pedantic on some subjects, sometimes I just try to look for basic simple rules these "profound" thinkers utilize that I have no desire to engage but actively dislike and come up from time to time, andI try to write it off as quickly as possible.  That's a bit if a fault of mine, but it saves time, and I think it's a useful fault.  There is no way I'm going to immerse myself in goofy and deranged things like Evola, transumanism, holistic medicine, or occult literature.  I can try and find ways to try to abstract it out though.  If I missed the point on Evola, oh well. Sorry. I'll take your word on it.  It's good some of us read this stuff.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2015, 09:43:58 PM by William T »
Holy Toledo!