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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 371775 times) Average Rating: 5
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« Reply #3825 on: March 09, 2014, 01:38:57 AM »

Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World
Another great book about creatures of the sea:
The Secret Life of Lobsters: How fisherman and scientists are unraveling the mysteries of our favorite crustacean by Trevor Corson.
(Note: AFAIK Roman Catholics can eat fish food such as cod and lobsters on Fridays of Lent).
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« Reply #3826 on: March 09, 2014, 08:59:40 AM »

Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World
Another great book about creatures of the sea:
The Secret Life of Lobsters: How fisherman and scientists are unraveling the mysteries of our favorite crustacean by Trevor Corson.
(Note: AFAIK Roman Catholics can eat fish food such as cod and lobsters on Fridays of Lent).

They can also eat alligator:

Quote
Following a question from a parishoner, New Orleans Archbishop Gregory M. Aymond wrote, “Concerning the question if alligator is acceptable to eat during the Lenten season...yes, the alligator is considered in the fish family.” Aymond wrote the letter in 2010, but it was just provided to the CNA last month.

I wonder who decided that alligator was in the "fish" family? Roll Eyes
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« Reply #3827 on: March 09, 2014, 10:07:28 AM »

Right now going through my World Book Day loot.
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« Reply #3828 on: March 09, 2014, 10:13:21 AM »

Right now going through my World Book Day loot.
Oh, I thought you mean the 'real' World Book. Shocked
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« Reply #3829 on: March 11, 2014, 11:28:18 PM »

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« Reply #3830 on: March 12, 2014, 10:44:22 AM »



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« Reply #3831 on: March 12, 2014, 11:27:27 AM »

Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World
Another great book about creatures of the sea:
The Secret Life of Lobsters: How fisherman and scientists are unraveling the mysteries of our favorite crustacean by Trevor Corson.
(Note: AFAIK Roman Catholics can eat fish food such as cod and lobsters on Fridays of Lent).

They can also eat alligator:

Quote
Following a question from a parishoner, New Orleans Archbishop Gregory M. Aymond wrote, “Concerning the question if alligator is acceptable to eat during the Lenten season...yes, the alligator is considered in the fish family.” Aymond wrote the letter in 2010, but it was just provided to the CNA last month.

I wonder who decided that alligator was in the "fish" family? Roll Eyes

The way I reason it, if it has a backbone but is cold-blooded, it's allowed on any day that fish is allowed. But I don't think tradition is explicit about creatures like alligators that aren't a traditional part of Greek or Russian cuisine. (I've heard from some quarters that reptiles in general are forbidden, but to be honest I'm doubtful about the authority behind that prohibition).

Some Orthodox would say invertebrates like lobsters are allowed on any fast day, though the Greek tradition I'm used to says shellfish are only allowed on oil days.

The Roman Catholics haven't forbidden fish on fast days since before the Schism, as far as I know. Actually, many Orthodox eventually adopted the practice of eating fish (but not meat or dairy) on fast days; I know that this at least formerly was the norm in Russia, except during the strictest periods like Clean Week and Holy Week.
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« Reply #3832 on: March 12, 2014, 04:41:07 PM »

I'm still reading stuff on Buddhism.
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« Reply #3833 on: March 12, 2014, 05:20:30 PM »

Actually, many Orthodox eventually adopted the practice of eating fish (but not meat or dairy) on fast days; I know that this at least formerly was the norm in Russia, except during the strictest periods like Clean Week and Holy Week.

LOL, if that was acceptable, I'd love Lent.  As it is, we agree to disagree on a few things.  Tongue
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« Reply #3834 on: March 12, 2014, 05:49:15 PM »

Alexis de Tocqueville - Democracy in America

A great book.
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« Reply #3835 on: March 12, 2014, 09:30:04 PM »

Actually, many Orthodox eventually adopted the practice of eating fish (but not meat or dairy) on fast days; I know that this at least formerly was the norm in Russia, except during the strictest periods like Clean Week and Holy Week.

LOL, if that was acceptable, I'd love Lent.  As it is, we agree to disagree on a few things.  Tongue

Fish is expensive so I don't eat it much except on designated fish days.
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« Reply #3836 on: March 12, 2014, 09:34:19 PM »

James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

A children's book, but great to read as an adult to appreciate what a great storyteller the man was. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is great, too. And I suppose Matilda, though I only saw the movie of that. Wikipedia is right that he is books are void of sentimentality and have a sort of dark humour, something I think is good for children. They need a healthy dose of violence--bad aunts getting smashed by a giant peach for years of abuse and nastiness or the enormous crocodile who is set on eating children who gets thrown off to the sun and burned to a crisp. It's good for children. And so are some tears because a character dies like Charlotte in Charlotte's Web. I remember bawling when my mom and I read that chapter when I was a kid.
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Aristotle says in the Metaphysics that "in mathematics goodness does not exist." It is a rather great quote to show to any math teacher when they tell you how important math is. Give them a riddle: I am not tall, I am not short, nor big nor take up any space but simply am. I have no name but I am.
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« Reply #3837 on: March 12, 2014, 09:37:03 PM »

Actually, many Orthodox eventually adopted the practice of eating fish (but not meat or dairy) on fast days; I know that this at least formerly was the norm in Russia, except during the strictest periods like Clean Week and Holy Week.

LOL, if that was acceptable, I'd love Lent.  As it is, we agree to disagree on a few things.  Tongue

Fish is expensive so I don't eat it much except on designated fish days.

However, lobster, crab, crayfish, snails, clams, shrimp, squid, octopus, and mussels are not considered fish as they are invertebrates. Because these boneless seafood and French snails are considered extremely expensive delicacies now, many do not consider this to be proper for Lent. Yet, several centuries ago, it was considered to be a poor man's diet.

An aside: I used to collected buckets of snails from my garden to feed to our Muscovy ducks who would stuff themselves with these French delicacies. It saved on our purchase of feed from the local tack store.
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« Reply #3838 on: March 12, 2014, 09:38:19 PM »


That book was required reading in our philosophy class when I was in college. I got to attend a awesome lecture by the author and shake his hand.
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« Reply #3839 on: March 12, 2014, 11:37:58 PM »


That book was required reading in our philosophy class when I was in college. I got to attend a awesome lecture by the author and shake his hand.

I also attended a lecture by him but I did not shake his hand. He also went to my church for the Divine Liturgy a couple of times and I think he spoke there after the service once (my memory is vague on this latter point).

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« Reply #3840 on: March 12, 2014, 11:56:03 PM »


An aside: I used to collected buckets of snails from my garden to feed to our Muscovy ducks who would stuff themselves with these French delicacies. It saved on our purchase of feed from the local tack store.

Ducks are great for getting rid of snails. Better than snail bait. We had a couple, sequentially. One watched the Kennedy assassination coverage on TV, the other Neal Armstrong landing on the moon (when each were young). I keep thinking I could make a business out of their snail eating capabilities, along with goats for weeding hillsides.
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« Reply #3841 on: March 13, 2014, 07:54:24 AM »

Actually, many Orthodox eventually adopted the practice of eating fish (but not meat or dairy) on fast days; I know that this at least formerly was the norm in Russia, except during the strictest periods like Clean Week and Holy Week.

LOL, if that was acceptable, I'd love Lent.  As it is, we agree to disagree on a few things.  Tongue

Fish is expensive so I don't eat it much except on designated fish days.

However, lobster, crab, crayfish, snails, clams, shrimp, squid, octopus, and mussels are not considered fish as they are invertebrates. Because these boneless seafood and French snails are considered extremely expensive delicacies now, many do not consider this to be proper for Lent. Yet, several centuries ago, it was considered to be a poor man's diet.

An aside: I used to collected buckets of snails from my garden to feed to our Muscovy ducks who would stuff themselves with these French delicacies. It saved on our purchase of feed from the local tack store.

According to the canonist Balsamon, shellfish are forbidden on days of xerophagy, and this is the tradition we follow at St Markella's. I know other authorities say shellfish can be had on any fast day, but this restriction would be in keeping with your point.

Maine fishermen would eat the cheap and plentiful lobsters after selling their catch of fish.
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« Reply #3842 on: March 13, 2014, 08:41:46 AM »

Some books are surprisingly good, and some are surprisingly disappointing. I ordered The Politics of Jesus by John H. Yoder, a renowned Christian pacifist from the Anabaptist tradition. This book has been hailed as one of the best defenses of Christian pacifism ever written. But I couldn't get past the first three pages. Highly unreadable. I couldn't understand anything he was saying. I skipped through to other chapters to see if they were more engaging, but alas it was the same. I had high expectations for it. Very disappointed. I don't mind struggling with ideas or wrestling with arguments, but I don't want to have to strain to understand your writing.


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« Reply #3843 on: March 13, 2014, 07:05:30 PM »

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« Reply #3844 on: March 14, 2014, 09:08:47 PM »

Back to reading this for school:

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« Reply #3845 on: March 15, 2014, 02:57:49 PM »

"The Preacher," Camilla Läckberg.  Smiley I like mysteries.
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« Reply #3846 on: March 19, 2014, 04:44:06 PM »

Alexis de Tocqueville - Memoir on Pauperism.

The guy was a genious.
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« Reply #3847 on: March 20, 2014, 03:59:39 PM »

Metallica: This Monster Lives (The Inside Story of the Film Some Kind of Monster), by Joe Berlinger and Greg Milner
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« Reply #3848 on: March 23, 2014, 05:13:51 PM »

Unsettling Diaspora: The Old Believers of Alaska, a thesis by Amber Lee Silva.

While focusing primarily on the priestly Old Believers of Nikolaevsk rather than my own priestless ones in the other villages, there's a shared history and much is applicable.

Though I only skimmed through it - I'll read it properly later - what little I saw left me somewhat depressed. When my generation is old and withered, our descendants won't know how much we lost and how much we failed to pass down to them.
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« Reply #3849 on: March 25, 2014, 02:15:57 AM »

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight for school.

That and some Poe stories for fun. I just read a very interesting one I never knew of called Eleonora. Obviously it's alluding to his wife/cousin Virginia Clem, who is the Lenore of The Raven and the Annabel Lee of that poem. She was the true love of his life. It is said he used to weep himself to sleep on her grave and thus the famous closing lines to Annabel Lee.


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And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
   Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
   In her sepulchre there by the sea—
   In her tomb by the sounding sea.


In fact reading the story and the poem side by side on can see it clearly. He constantly speaks of Eleonora's bright eyes in the story and he makes it clear it is his first cousin, just like Virginia Clem was, who he grew up with. In the story the narrator and Eleonora fall in love in a mystical valley called the Valley of the Many-Colored Grass and then Eleonora dies, but before she dies the narrator makes a vow never to love another woman, under a clearly grim fate if he should.  The narrator breaks his vow, just like Poe ended up finding another woman to satisfy his romantic leanings, but he is absolved of breaking his vow by Eleonora and granted permission to marry this other woman by his dead beloved. The story is almost a narrative poem in itself, more mystical than a story in terms of a story line. It's so clear who and what he is writing about. Written towards the of his life it is a clear way to mystically cope with the death of Virginia.

http://poestories.com/read/eleonora
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Aristotle says in the Metaphysics that "in mathematics goodness does not exist." It is a rather great quote to show to any math teacher when they tell you how important math is. Give them a riddle: I am not tall, I am not short, nor big nor take up any space but simply am. I have no name but I am.
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« Reply #3850 on: March 25, 2014, 01:23:57 PM »

Euripides - Ion
Plato - Crito
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« Reply #3851 on: March 25, 2014, 03:45:51 PM »

Joseph de Maistre - On the Pope
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« Reply #3852 on: March 26, 2014, 11:01:01 AM »

I'm looking for some article about Scientism. Any recommendations? I've been assuming that it is basically naiive, simplistic and false idea of science comparable to any religion but I haven't given it much thought. Maybe reading something about it would help to clear my thoughts.
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« Reply #3853 on: March 26, 2014, 02:35:59 PM »

Joseph de Maistre - On the Pope

Interesting. I know an Orthodox fellow, a convert from Catholicism, who is a fan of Maistre. How's the book reading it from an Eastern Orthodox perspective? Do you like Maistre?
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Aristotle says in the Metaphysics that "in mathematics goodness does not exist." It is a rather great quote to show to any math teacher when they tell you how important math is. Give them a riddle: I am not tall, I am not short, nor big nor take up any space but simply am. I have no name but I am.
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« Reply #3854 on: March 26, 2014, 03:26:48 PM »

Joseph de Maistre - On the Pope

Interesting. I know an Orthodox fellow, a convert from Catholicism, who is a fan of Maistre. How's the book reading it from an Eastern Orthodox perspective? Do you like Maistre?

He's a bit weird. He seems to really like absolute monarchies and claims that kings and popes should be regarded as infallible, even when only the Pope really is infallible according to de Maistre. His ideas about human nature and society do sometimes make sense, but I don't think that many today would subscribe to his entire ideology. He's more extreme and more of an idealist than, lets say, a contemporary like Burke. But De Maistre's wit and eloquence makes his works easier to read.

On the Pope is mainly a theological book and only now and then takes on the French Revolution. He's mainly interested in defending ultramontanism and even bothers to look into and cite Church Slavonic service books. Not many people in the West took the Orthodox very seriously at that time, let alone were interested in Church Slavonic, so that makes reading De Maistre from an Orthodox perspective somewhat interesting. He really does go out of his way to defend ultramontanism, though. His political theories are nice for the hyperdox as well since they're into that whole czar-worshipping thing.
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« Reply #3855 on: March 26, 2014, 03:38:40 PM »

Sound's interesting. I would say more but this is not the political section. I will say to some degree I share your view on absolute monarchy but I am really not able to say more given the limits of this section. I'll have to read De Maistre when I get a chance. I know a French royalist fellow who considers him more or less divine. From what I have read I agree he seems to have some good social points, but goes to far on monarchy and papacy.
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Aristotle says in the Metaphysics that "in mathematics goodness does not exist." It is a rather great quote to show to any math teacher when they tell you how important math is. Give them a riddle: I am not tall, I am not short, nor big nor take up any space but simply am. I have no name but I am.
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« Reply #3856 on: March 27, 2014, 06:43:44 PM »

Pope Benedict's Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week.
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« Reply #3857 on: March 28, 2014, 01:30:59 AM »

Golden Mouth, the life of John Chrysostom by JND Kelly

I'm currently going through this book faster than alot of the other materials I have and his depiction of Saint John is fair while being very critical of certain perceived flaws in John Chrysostom. I'm enjoying it alot and learning alot as well and I think I'll read more of Dr Kelly's books in the future.

Also reading Nausicaa of the valley of the wind, which surprised me as being alot better than the movie, in that it was not a super environmentalist Graphic novel (absolute rejection of technology), but instead offering a depiction of a world in decline and facing many disease, famine and health issues with the lack of modern technology.
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« Reply #3858 on: March 28, 2014, 02:42:46 AM »

Golden Mouth, the life of John Chrysostom by JND Kelly

I'm currently going through this book faster than alot of the other materials I have and his depiction of Saint John is fair while being very critical of certain perceived flaws in John Chrysostom. I'm enjoying it alot and learning alot as well and I think I'll read more of Dr Kelly's books in the future.

Also reading Nausicaa of the valley of the wind, which surprised me as being alot better than the movie, in that it was not a super environmentalist Graphic novel (absolute rejection of technology), but instead offering a depiction of a world in decline and facing many disease, famine and health issues with the lack of modern technology.

I didn't enjoy this book very much. A bit too academic and I also found it disrespectful to our holy father at times. But I do realize this wasn't meant to be hagiography. I think a good, readable book about the Golden Mouth needs to be written that can honestly address his struggles and flaws without undermining his sainthood. Just my opinion.


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« Reply #3859 on: March 28, 2014, 09:46:39 AM »

Proverbs 1-9 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) / Michael V. Fox.
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« Reply #3860 on: March 28, 2014, 10:17:33 AM »

Finished "Unknown Pilgrim" by Rene Gothoni.  Reading "Lenten Spring" by Fr. Thomas Hopko.
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« Reply #3861 on: March 28, 2014, 10:25:37 AM »

Skimming through A Storm of Swords as a refresher, in anticipation of Game of Thrones S4.
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« Reply #3862 on: March 28, 2014, 10:17:10 PM »

Orthodoxy and The Religion of the Future by Father Seraphim Rose

Almost finished with it. Mixed feelings. Hard to process them. I can only say that the book is full of necessary truth, and yet parts of it seem to border on a fundamentalist zealotry that makes me very uneasy. It's hard to disagree with any of Father Seraphim Rose's arguments, but I guess it seems to me that he throws the baby out with the bathwater at times. A bit of an overcorrection I think; but perhaps it was necessary considering the many influential spiritual deceptions that are ensnaring so many people in this day and age. But far be it from me to critique the words of a man who might well be a saint.


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« Reply #3863 on: March 29, 2014, 01:16:14 AM »

Golden Mouth, the life of John Chrysostom by JND Kelly

I'm currently going through this book faster than alot of the other materials I have and his depiction of Saint John is fair while being very critical of certain perceived flaws in John Chrysostom. I'm enjoying it alot and learning alot as well and I think I'll read more of Dr Kelly's books in the future.

Also reading Nausicaa of the valley of the wind, which surprised me as being alot better than the movie, in that it was not a super environmentalist Graphic novel (absolute rejection of technology), but instead offering a depiction of a world in decline and facing many disease, famine and health issues with the lack of modern technology.

I didn't enjoy this book very much. A bit too academic and I also found it disrespectful to our holy father at times. But I do realize this wasn't meant to be hagiography. I think a good, readable book about the Golden Mouth needs to be written that can honestly address his struggles and flaws without undermining his sainthood. Just my opinion.


Selam

I don't think Dr Kelly undermines Saint John any more so than Saint John undermined himself, which I think is the healthy Christian attitude all of us should have. I find the book very fair myself, showing the flaws of Saint John, like I think the most glaring flaw in John was his early over zealous fasting which ruined his health and digestive system, but also showing his zeal which made him go to such lengths in the first place and his desire to spread the word.

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« Reply #3864 on: March 29, 2014, 01:20:04 AM »

Orthodoxy and The Religion of the Future by Father Seraphim Rose

...But far be it from me to critique the words of a man who might well be a saint.

Rest easy! I will take up that difficult and precarious task  Wink Cheesy angel
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« Reply #3865 on: March 29, 2014, 02:38:06 AM »

I do believe he's a Saint but I don't understand why we couldn't criticize his ideas.
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« Reply #3866 on: April 05, 2014, 01:11:38 AM »

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Quote from: Nikolaostheservant
tonight you die of a heart attack in your sleep. your at the pearly gates wanting to get in but you have not been very good nor have you been very bad, sin wise the scales are even. so to break the tie God asks you to explain this post you made, what u gona say?
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« Reply #3867 on: April 05, 2014, 04:40:38 AM »

« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 04:41:29 AM by Asteriktos » Logged
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« Reply #3868 on: April 05, 2014, 11:36:44 AM »



The classic. Got it at a thrift store for $0.50. Much better than I anticipated.
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« Reply #3869 on: April 07, 2014, 09:08:02 PM »

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