Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 465169 times)

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Offline JamesR

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3555 on: November 06, 2013, 02:31:18 AM »
Beyond Good and Evil by Nietzsche.
...Or it's just possible he's a mouthy young man on an internet forum.
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Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3556 on: November 06, 2013, 02:36:58 AM »
Beyond Good and Evil by Nietzsche.

A perfect text for you now and when you are twice your age. Different harvests for different seasons.
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3557 on: November 06, 2013, 08:53:58 AM »
A preview of The Luxury of Afterwards by Christine Downing.
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Offline Shiny

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3558 on: November 06, 2013, 09:09:24 AM »
We can take this to PM. Or if you really want to get serious and Shanochros, is up for it, we can take this whole thing somewhere else (we have a place) and do some reading. My head is killing me lately, but Heidegger is familiar enough not to tax it too much anymore.
Hey I will take it serious. I have three day weekend coming up to boot.

I'll seriously pay you money if you think I'm joking.

I dont want you to waste your time

Been thinking about hitting up Romaios on some stuff too...
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Offline Romaios

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3559 on: November 06, 2013, 06:05:06 PM »
IIRC that work of Heidegger's had a somewhat anti-capitalistic gist. He claimed to be horrified by the "enframing"/exploitation of human labour.

To place Heidegger within such categories is to miss the point, which is almost always the case.

I was trying to make him more palatable to Augustin. But that seems to be a lost cause...

I really don't know what to say to that.
How did the wheel enframe locomotion perhaps?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2013, 06:06:10 PM by Romaios »

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3560 on: November 06, 2013, 06:19:46 PM »
I love reading Aristotle

Do you like Aristotle's writing style?
« Last Edit: November 06, 2013, 06:19:53 PM by Cyrillic »
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Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3561 on: November 06, 2013, 06:39:14 PM »
IIRC that work of Heidegger's had a somewhat anti-capitalistic gist. He claimed to be horrified by the "enframing"/exploitation of human labour.

To place Heidegger within such categories is to miss the point, which is almost always the case.

I was trying to make him more palatable to Augustin. But that seems to be a lost cause...

I really don't know what to say to that.
How did the wheel enframe locomotion perhaps?

Augustin needs to discuss such matters over a beer or the like. A symposium if you will.

Really, the old nazi would be quite comforted by Augustin's trust in his volksdasein.
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Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3562 on: November 07, 2013, 03:22:14 AM »
Merton's voluminous journals. More like leafing through them.

Can't go wrong with Merton!  :)


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Offline Jetavan

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3563 on: November 07, 2013, 01:09:44 PM »
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3564 on: November 07, 2013, 01:10:12 PM »
Aeschylus - Eumenides
At nunc desertis cessant sacraria lucis:
aurum omnes victa iam pietate colunt.
-Propertius, Elegies III.XIII:47-48

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Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3565 on: November 07, 2013, 01:18:44 PM »
"Do not tempt the Mor thy Mod."

New thread topic.  Rate the sexual attractiveness of members of OC.net on a scale of 1-10.

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Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3566 on: November 07, 2013, 01:19:52 PM »
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Offline Shiny

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3567 on: November 07, 2013, 01:21:17 PM »
“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan

Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3568 on: November 07, 2013, 01:22:02 PM »
David Bentley Hart, "The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, and Bliss"

Care to offer a review once you are finished?
Youd love his book on atheists lol.

I dunno. I liked his essay on baseball and time.
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Offline Shiny

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3569 on: November 07, 2013, 01:24:14 PM »
David Bentley Hart, "The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, and Bliss"

Care to offer a review once you are finished?
Youd love his book on atheists lol.

I dunno. I liked his essay on baseball and time.
His book on theodicy was a little weak from what I remember. But then again what argument for that is ever strong?

From an amazon.com review in that link:
Hart will help you to understand intellectually why trying to have an ontology without The Ground of our Being (aka God) is like unto trying to have Being and Not Being at the same time. This book is a pretty thorough development of ideas and takes on all the serious naturalists with respect. Thus, not a polemic but an honest bit of philosophy for the honest and open reader.
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Offline Jetavan

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3570 on: November 07, 2013, 02:19:07 PM »
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
सर्वभूतहित
Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3571 on: November 10, 2013, 07:52:19 PM »
David Bentley Hart, "The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, and Bliss"
Hart's argument is directed toward the New Atheist, especially those who claim that the existence of 'God', being potentially empirically verifiable, has not been scientifically confirmed. Victor Stenger on the 'God Hypothesis' (see, e.g., here) is one example of such.

Stenger writes: "The scientific method is not limited to what professional scientists do but can be applied to any question that relates to observations." He also notes that that the deities most people worship are deities that have an effect on the natural world (e.g., miracles).

Hart's emphasis, though, is on the 'deity' who makes existence itself (including all 'deities') possible. He terms this 'deity' 'God', the 'God' of classical theism. He differentiates God -- which is the only true 'God' -- with a 'deity', a 'god', who is inherently separate from its creation, manipulating its creation like a potter manipulates his clay to produce a clay pot, a potter whose death does not alter the existence of the now-made clay pot. The true 'God', however, is that which makes anything possible, and whose non-existence would necessarily mean the non-existence of all beings. Such God is not observable, and not even theoretically empirically verifiable.

Fortunately, Hart does include a chapter where he discusses how contemplative prayer is able to put one into communion with God, and how contemplative prayer is the 'method' that can confirm whether God exists, but this method does not involve 'observation' or 'empiricism'. It involves going deeply into the second characteristic of God (and of ourselves) -- consciousness (the first being 'existence' itself). Hart notes that contemplative prayer, of one sort or another, is associated with all types of theistic traditions, from Christianity to Vedanta to Sufism to Judaism and so forth (even, he hints, to Theravada Buddhism, but I digress).

The source of all being is also absolutely conscious, and the consciousness of the source of all being is inherently blissful, thus giving us the third characteristic of God: all-bliss, all-joy, which is reflected in the human desire for the 'good' (which desire even supposed 'atheists' have). Hart then ties this desire for good as posing problems for evolutionary theory's supposition that altruism can be explained by means of natural selection. Personally, I found his critique of evolution in this regard less than satisfying, but I appreciated his critique of Intelligent Design as a theology of a lesser 'god' and not the true God.

I found his idea intriguing that modern atheism is not so much the result of more scientific information, but of a modern forgetting of what God really is, the mystery of being itself. In this way, much of what passes for Christian theology is actually simply another form of this forgetting, another form of atheism. Whereas the New Atheists rejects 'god', much of modern Christian theology defends 'god', being oblivious to God.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 07:55:10 PM by Jetavan »
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
सर्वभूतहित
Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.

Offline Marc1152

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3572 on: November 10, 2013, 11:02:05 PM »

"Grain Brain" by Dr. David Perlmutter
Your idea has been debunked 1000 times already.. Maybe 1001 will be the charm

Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3573 on: November 11, 2013, 01:31:25 AM »
David Bentley Hart, "The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, and Bliss"
Hart's argument is directed toward the New Atheist, especially those who claim that the existence of 'God', being potentially empirically verifiable, has not been scientifically confirmed. Victor Stenger on the 'God Hypothesis' (see, e.g., here) is one example of such.

Stenger writes: "The scientific method is not limited to what professional scientists do but can be applied to any question that relates to observations." He also notes that that the deities most people worship are deities that have an effect on the natural world (e.g., miracles).

Hart's emphasis, though, is on the 'deity' who makes existence itself (including all 'deities') possible. He terms this 'deity' 'God', the 'God' of classical theism. He differentiates God -- which is the only true 'God' -- with a 'deity', a 'god', who is inherently separate from its creation, manipulating its creation like a potter manipulates his clay to produce a clay pot, a potter whose death does not alter the existence of the now-made clay pot. The true 'God', however, is that which makes anything possible, and whose non-existence would necessarily mean the non-existence of all beings. Such God is not observable, and not even theoretically empirically verifiable.

Fortunately, Hart does include a chapter where he discusses how contemplative prayer is able to put one into communion with God, and how contemplative prayer is the 'method' that can confirm whether God exists, but this method does not involve 'observation' or 'empiricism'. It involves going deeply into the second characteristic of God (and of ourselves) -- consciousness (the first being 'existence' itself). Hart notes that contemplative prayer, of one sort or another, is associated with all types of theistic traditions, from Christianity to Vedanta to Sufism to Judaism and so forth (even, he hints, to Theravada Buddhism, but I digress).

The source of all being is also absolutely conscious, and the consciousness of the source of all being is inherently blissful, thus giving us the third characteristic of God: all-bliss, all-joy, which is reflected in the human desire for the 'good' (which desire even supposed 'atheists' have). Hart then ties this desire for good as posing problems for evolutionary theory's supposition that altruism can be explained by means of natural selection. Personally, I found his critique of evolution in this regard less than satisfying, but I appreciated his critique of Intelligent Design as a theology of a lesser 'god' and not the true God.

I found his idea intriguing that modern atheism is not so much the result of more scientific information, but of a modern forgetting of what God really is, the mystery of being itself. In this way, much of what passes for Christian theology is actually simply another form of this forgetting, another form of atheism. Whereas the New Atheists rejects 'god', much of modern Christian theology defends 'god', being oblivious to God.

Thanks. He seems to like Seinsvergessenheit to make hay. I always wonder what he has to say that theologians who have attempted to appropriated Heidegger already haven't.
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Online Justin Kissel

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3574 on: November 12, 2013, 05:46:29 PM »

It's about black metal. And stuff. Lots of pictures. Semi-coffee-table book kind of thing I guess? Anyway, looks interesting enough.


Sort of a light overview of the Dragon Age universe. A bit meh really.

Also rereading the collection of texts by John Henry Newman titled: Conscience, Consensus, and the Development of Doctrine. I hope to take some notes this time around and when I'm done perhaps start a thread on the topic... hopefully one that doesn't devolve into the usual stuff. :angel:

Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3575 on: November 12, 2013, 09:10:56 PM »

It's about black metal. And stuff. Lots of pictures. Semi-coffee-table book kind of thing I guess? Anyway, looks interesting enough.


Sort of a light overview of the Dragon Age universe. A bit meh really.

Also rereading the collection of texts by John Henry Newman titled: Conscience, Consensus, and the Development of Doctrine. I hope to take some notes this time around and when I'm done perhaps start a thread on the topic... hopefully one that doesn't devolve into the usual stuff. :angel:

I thought you were gone.

Oh well . . .
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Offline Hinterlander

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3576 on: November 13, 2013, 12:45:21 AM »

Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3577 on: November 13, 2013, 04:59:15 AM »
I'm only 1500 pages into this one. So far it's a bit dry.




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Online Justin Kissel

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3578 on: November 13, 2013, 11:08:11 PM »
I thought you were gone.

Oh well . . .

I'll be gone when I'm gone, which may or may not be soon. Until then, feel free to bask in my [idiosyncrasies]...

Offline Opus118

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3579 on: November 14, 2013, 12:35:49 AM »
I'm only 1500 pages into this one. So far it's a bit dry.




Selam

This is just to mention that some people recognize this person as Professor Irwin Corey, who deserves to be named rather than ignored. I agree he would not have written about this topic.

Offline W.A.Mozart

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3580 on: November 14, 2013, 08:24:28 PM »
completely new, especially not yet used

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3581 on: November 16, 2013, 03:58:46 PM »
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3582 on: November 16, 2013, 04:03:27 PM »
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.

V. 3, no? I read it earlier this year, and thought I'd like it more than I did. Hope you enjoy it more :)

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3583 on: November 16, 2013, 04:09:07 PM »
^ Yes, v.3.  I read your earlier post and read vols. 1 & 2 and now 3.  Sometimes the author rushes from one theologian to another.  I take it he assumes we already know some about the history of doctrine, but I do not.  I still find it informative and overall am glad I am reading the series.

Offline Rufus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3584 on: November 16, 2013, 05:05:17 PM »
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.

I'm readin #5.

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3585 on: November 16, 2013, 06:08:59 PM »
^ What do you think of it?  Did you read v.4?

Offline Shiny

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3586 on: November 16, 2013, 06:26:57 PM »
Trollope. Nothing in particular.
“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3587 on: November 16, 2013, 06:48:25 PM »
I like this a lot.

FERNANDO PESSOA / ÁLVARO DE CAMPOS
TABACARIA
Tobacco Shop
http://leoleituraescrita.blogspot.com/2010/02/tabacaria-tobacco-shop-fernando-pessoa.html

I am nothing.
Never I'll be anything.
I cannot wish to be anything.
Aside from this, I have within me all the dreams of the world.

Windows of my bedroom,
Of my bedroom of one of the world's millions nobody knows who is
(And if they knew who is, what would they know?)
Give access to the mystery of a street constantly crossed by people.
To a street inaccessible to all of thoughts,
Real, impossibly real, certain, unknowingly certain,
With the mystery of things beneath the stones and beings,
With death putting dampness in the walls and men's white hairs,
With Destiny driving the wagon of everything through the road of nothing.

Today I am defeated, as if I knew the truth.
Today I am lucid, as if I were about to die
And had no more brotherhood with things
Than a goodbye, becoming this house and this streetside
A row of train wagons, and a whistled departure
From inside my head,
And a jolt of my nerves and a grind of bones on the going.

Today I am perplexed, as one who wondered and found and forgot.
Today I am divided between the loyalty I owe
To the Tobacco Shop on the other side of the street, as external real thing,
And to the feeling that everything is a dream, as inward real thing.

I have failed in everything.
And since I had no purposes, maybe everything was nothing.
The learning they gave me,
I go down from this by the window at the back of the house.
I went to the open country with grand purposes.
But there I found only grass and trees,
And when there were people, they were just as other.
I move away from the window, I sit in a chair. What shall I think about ?

More in the link.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 06:48:38 PM by Shiny »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3588 on: November 16, 2013, 09:08:20 PM »
Old Greek literature schoolbooks.
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3589 on: November 16, 2013, 10:12:12 PM »
Pablo Neruda's sonnets.
Happy shall he be, that shall take and dash thy little ones against the rock. Alleluia.

No longer pasting here.

Another blog - http://literarydiktator.blogspot.com/

Offline Andrew21091

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3590 on: November 16, 2013, 10:22:54 PM »
Confessor Between East and West: A Portrait of Ukrainian Cardinal Josyf Slipyj by Jaroslav Pelikan

Offline xOrthodox4Christx

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3591 on: November 16, 2013, 11:01:53 PM »
Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why, Bart Ehrman

I am also reading a few books by John Dominic Crossan and the Jesus Seminar. (I can anticipate the reactions, but I also read some conservative authors too)

Something interesting as I read The First Paul was that Crossan and Borg (a Catholic and Lutheran respectively) come to an Orthodox understanding of Paul's meaning of Justification and the Passion of Christ and he condemns the Protestant and Catholic view.
I think I may lend this book to some fundy friends. :) I might lend away Ehrman's too, when I am finished with it.

If anyone is wondering 'why' it's because my final paper is going to be on the Historical Jesus. And obviously textual criticism, interpretive philosophy and many sources are required for that.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 11:09:57 PM by xOrthodox4Christx »
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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3592 on: November 16, 2013, 11:36:34 PM »
The Book of Common Prayer 1928. Yeah, I needed the Morning and Evening Office Readings tables...
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Offline scamandrius

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3593 on: November 17, 2013, 02:31:51 AM »
The Brothers Menaechmus by Plautus.
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Offline biro

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3594 on: November 17, 2013, 02:53:22 PM »
The Fellowship of the Ring.

Offline newtoorthodoxy

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3595 on: November 17, 2013, 04:30:51 PM »
Mother Angelica's biography.  Fascinating life, but she got into some weird stuff here and there.

Some of my questions might appear patently stupid to those well-versed in Orthodoxy, but I'm brand new, having no background in the faith.  Please grant me a great deal of patience and consideration as I learn the basics.

Offline Rufus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3596 on: November 17, 2013, 08:55:05 PM »
^ What do you think of it?  Did you read v.4?

Haven't read any other part of the series. I picked this one up to get an introduction to modern theology, which I desperately need to know more about.

So far it is lacking in the penetrating analysis that I live for, but it is nonetheless serving as an excellent introductory textbook.

Offline Jetavan

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3597 on: November 18, 2013, 05:26:48 PM »
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
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Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.

Offline Rufus

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3598 on: November 18, 2013, 06:00:40 PM »
The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy.

Offline orthonorm

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Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #3599 on: November 18, 2013, 08:58:46 PM »
The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy.

A quick review when you are finished? Yeah, neah, that type of thing.
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