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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 398070 times) Average Rating: 5
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« Reply #3330 on: October 09, 2013, 04:49:19 PM »

A Short History of Byzantium by John Julius Norwich

I picked up this book at a used bookstore.  I might start reading it  . . . any comments OC.net?

Pop history.

Is there a better place to start for a survey of Byzantine history?

I liked A History of the Byzantine State and Society by Warren Treadgold.
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« Reply #3331 on: October 12, 2013, 03:54:05 PM »

The Revelation.
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« Reply #3332 on: October 12, 2013, 03:59:17 PM »

The Moralia by Plutarch. It'll keep me busy for a while.
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« Reply #3333 on: October 13, 2013, 12:48:56 AM »

Catholicism and Fundamentalism - The Attack on "Romanism" by "Bible Christians" by Karl Keating
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« Reply #3334 on: October 13, 2013, 07:50:20 AM »

Extended interview with metropolitan Savva.
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« Reply #3335 on: October 13, 2013, 11:51:19 AM »

Knowledge of the Holy, by A.W. Tozer.

Recommended to me by a "non-denominational" Christian friend several years ago. I'm finding it to be quite good, actually.
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« Reply #3336 on: October 13, 2013, 05:15:04 PM »

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« Reply #3337 on: October 13, 2013, 05:41:39 PM »

I have a rather odd story concerning Everyday Saints and Other Stories.

Earlier this year, I kept encountering it everywhere on the internet, especially on this site. So, one day, I figured that I'd go to the official website and read one of the selected stories. The very first one listed is about Archimandrite John (Krestiankin) and reading it, I was well pleased, until I neared the end and saw that he had died on the morning of February 5th, 2006.

This wouldn't have meant much if it wasn't for the fact that, according to Moscow Time, it was actually the morning of February 5th, 2013, the seventh anniversary of his repose.

It could just be a wild coincidence, but it scared me nonetheless.
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« Reply #3338 on: October 13, 2013, 06:28:27 PM »

Game of Thrones

Book of Genesis

Ancient Greek Philosophy Reader
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« Reply #3339 on: October 13, 2013, 06:41:51 PM »


Is that real???


LOL@ the selected stories photos.

This is an EPIC pic.
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« Reply #3340 on: October 13, 2013, 11:56:59 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification

« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 12:10:39 AM by Severian » Logged

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« Reply #3341 on: October 15, 2013, 04:23:04 PM »

Ausberg and Constantinople and The New Testament and the People of God.
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« Reply #3342 on: October 15, 2013, 04:46:51 PM »

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« Reply #3343 on: October 15, 2013, 04:50:51 PM »

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Happy Holidays!


« Reply #3344 on: October 15, 2013, 06:14:54 PM »

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« Reply #3345 on: October 15, 2013, 06:42:28 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification



Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/

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« Reply #3346 on: October 15, 2013, 06:49:20 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification



Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/



Oh, I saw the physics issue as well,

http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Calculus-Analysis-Volume-I/dp/1461389577

Courant might afford a more "practical" approach and problem sets thus maybe helping with the physics (I am not sure what maths you are using in physics), while Spivak tends towards analysis, IIRC. Integration is also presented first, again IIRc.
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« Reply #3347 on: October 15, 2013, 06:53:40 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification



Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/


For some strange reason, I really enjoyed Calc III.
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« Reply #3348 on: October 15, 2013, 06:57:23 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification



Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/


For some strange reason, I really enjoyed Calc III.

What's Calc III? Depending on quarters or semesters it differs and I guess whether you go to a school that attempts to combine such curriculum across engineering / sci and math majors.
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« Reply #3349 on: October 15, 2013, 07:25:34 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification


Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.
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« Reply #3350 on: October 15, 2013, 07:26:15 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification



Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/


For some strange reason, I really enjoyed Calc III.

What's Calc III? Depending on quarters or semesters it differs and I guess whether you go to a school that attempts to combine such curriculum across engineering / sci and math majors.
Basically just multidimensional Calc.

At my college we learned differntiation in Calc I, Integration in Calc II, and in Calc three we applied both to multivariable functions ( f(x,y), f(x,y,z), f(x,y,z...) etc. I guess for some strange reason I just liked graphing and finding integrals in three dimensions. Not very high level stuff, but fun for some strange reason.
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« Reply #3351 on: October 15, 2013, 07:31:57 PM »

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.
That's really interesting.

Thanks for sharing that piece of info, now I can be snarky if I ever meet one of those AP nerds again.
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« Reply #3352 on: October 15, 2013, 07:43:52 PM »

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.
That's really interesting.

Thanks for sharing that piece of info, now I can be snarky if I ever meet one of those AP nerds again.
I actually was one of those people who took AP Calc in high school, and yes, it made the first semester of college calc difficult. We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.
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« Reply #3353 on: October 15, 2013, 07:47:32 PM »

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.
That's really interesting.

Thanks for sharing that piece of info, now I can be snarky if I ever meet one of those AP nerds again.

IME, the only justification for an AP class is if the teacher is exceptionally good.
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« Reply #3354 on: October 15, 2013, 07:52:17 PM »

Now:
A Briefer History of Time
Physics Essentials for Dummies
Calculus Essentials for Dummies
The Life of Saint Anthony


Later:
A Brief History of Time (the remaining chapters which I haven't already read)
Calculus for Dummies
Calculus II for Dummies
Six Easy Pieces
Saint Athanasius and Sanctification


Are you struggling with calc?

Having recently looked at some texts, I can't recommend more highly the following for beginning calc:

This is a classic and available for free as editions are out of copyright or can pay for a bound copy I guess:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus_Made_Easy

You will laugh out loud. The Elements of Style of mathematics.

I am not sure why this is not used at the standard text in school on calc:

http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-4th-Michael-Spivak/dp/0914098918/

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.

Same here.

I took hillybilly calc. We didn't have no GPA raising "AP" courses nowhere.
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« Reply #3355 on: October 15, 2013, 07:59:08 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!! 
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« Reply #3356 on: October 15, 2013, 08:02:44 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!! 

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.
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« Reply #3357 on: October 15, 2013, 08:22:12 PM »

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.

Same here.

I took hillybilly calc. We didn't have no GPA raising "AP" courses nowhere.

Excellent. Just out of curiosity, I assume it was a public school?

I really thought and still think that I learned more mental skills in high school while playing sports than in classes, with a couple exceptions.
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« Reply #3358 on: October 15, 2013, 08:24:05 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!!  

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.
This is actually very true. Our mathematical education in public schools tends to focus on calculations and algorithms. But in college, professors are more intersted in conceptual knoweldge. 
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« Reply #3359 on: October 15, 2013, 08:33:09 PM »

When I took freshman Calculus, the students who had the worst time were the ones who had taken AP Calc in high school. The degree of correlation was really startling.

Same here.

I took hillybilly calc. We didn't have no GPA raising "AP" courses nowhere.

Excellent. Just out of curiosity, I assume it was a public school?

I really thought and still think that I learned more mental skills in high school while playing sports than in classes, with a couple exceptions.

Public? Yeah, I think half of us were on free lunch.

I was lucky to have a math teacher who went back to the sticks to inherit a ton of tobacco money through marriage rather than do middling research at a university, so I actually learned something my maths.

But everything else was pointless. But yeah, wrestling was more important than anything else.
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« Reply #3360 on: October 15, 2013, 08:49:40 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!! 

What high school teaches inorganic chemistry??

I mean, beyond "this is Sodium, this is Boson, this is a Salt..."
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« Reply #3361 on: October 15, 2013, 08:58:01 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!! 

What high school teaches inorganic chemistry??

I mean, beyond "this is Sodium, this is Boson, this is a Salt..."

Our science teacher had a teaching certificate in "physical sciences".

If you check out the curricula for teaching majors you would take high school teachers even less seriously.

I once considered doing something like "giving back" while in college and I love kidz, teenz, and people like that. So I walk over to the teacher's college and the advisor looks at my classes and gradez and basically asked if I had lost my mind.

I also would've lost money taking up being learned teaching and would have been burdened with taking undergrad seminars with girlz about topics like the shadowbox.

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« Reply #3362 on: October 15, 2013, 09:10:37 PM »

^ so that's the reason my high school education sucked.

I took an AP social studies class, they wanted me to write 3 page papers every two nights. I dropped outta that shabang real quick.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 09:11:20 PM by Achronos » Logged

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« Reply #3363 on: October 15, 2013, 09:12:22 PM »

^ so that's the reason my high school education sucked.

I took an AP social studies class, they wanted me to write 3 page papers every two nights. I dropped outta that shabang real quick.

Cause given your post frequency you certainly couldn't BS that much?
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« Reply #3364 on: October 15, 2013, 09:14:45 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!! 

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.

Well I'm glad there's one other person in the world who doesn't think I'm insane for going into science to avoid math.
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« Reply #3365 on: October 15, 2013, 09:15:12 PM »

What high school teaches inorganic chemistry??

I mean, beyond "this is Sodium, this is Boson, this is a Salt..."

Not high school, college.  I remember learning how to do certain calculations in high school, and then having to do the same in college via a different method.  I was able to get the right answer, but I was wrong because I couldn't do it their way.  I tried seeing the TA's for extra help, but they appeared to have been recent immigrants from China, and I couldn't understand their English through their accents.  Chemistry was fun in high school, but frustrating in college.  

So I went into theology.   Undecided
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« Reply #3366 on: October 15, 2013, 09:26:00 PM »

What high school teaches inorganic chemistry??

I mean, beyond "this is Sodium, this is Boson, this is a Salt..."

Not high school, college.  I remember learning how to do certain calculations in high school, and then having to do the same in college via a different method.  I was able to get the right answer, but I was wrong because I couldn't do it their way.  I tried seeing the TA's for extra help, but they appeared to have been recent immigrants from China, and I couldn't understand their English through their accents.  Chemistry was fun in high school, but frustrating in college.  

So I went into theology.   Undecided

This school I went to for half a minute would let pretty much anyone "matriculate" into Engineering if you hit the ACT minimals for the department which was pretty low, like a 28 or 30.

Any, they used their block calc to weed odd everyone the first quarter. Bell curve with tests no one could pass. No one without some degree of genius.

And the TAs were literally all Chinese kids who just got to America. Profs phoning it in. And TAs who couldn't speak English.

I took the one block final to help them figure out how "fair" they were being to the engineers.

The average was ~34%. I was one of the best students in the math department at the time and I got an 85%.

Two girls managed to best me by 3 points. We were on scholarship in maths. And none of us had gotten less than an A on a math exam. The next math student hit a 58%.

Thing that was insane was that was how all these students tests were. I can't imagine the anxiety the managed to force these kids through. Engineering is now joke in terms of work and they add that garbage on top of that? Due to lazy admissions and turning a buck on students.

Oh and those who dropped outta engineering?

IT not comp sci and yes, teachers. All of them.
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« Reply #3367 on: October 15, 2013, 09:26:08 PM »

^ so that's the reason my high school education sucked.

I took an AP social studies class, they wanted me to write 3 page papers every two nights. I dropped outta that shabang real quick.

Cause given your post frequency you certainly couldn't BS that much?
I had an F and the teacher pulled me into his office after school, second week in.

I ended up moving to an Honors class.

I yelled at an Honors English teacher and was pulled to go to regular 10th grade English.

I took Spanish in HS for 3 years and every single time I ended up in the Dean's office for screaming at them.

I really don't know what it was about those Spanish teachers. One of them accused me of stealing her textbook. These accusations went back and forth for a good 2 minutes then I raised my voice and cussed her out.

Find out the following day this stupid kid in my class had the book, was going to stop our dialogue, but knew where it was going and did nothing.

Cool thing my counselor treated me so special, bailed me out everytime.
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« Reply #3368 on: October 15, 2013, 09:28:40 PM »

Make matters worse, Halo 2 ruined me. After school I pretty much played that game all the time, online with friends.

My parents wasted like 100 bucks for a dumb prep ACT class. We tried to cram 12 grades worth of education in a 90 minute class.

It was a complete catastrophe.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 09:30:47 PM by Achronos » Logged

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« Reply #3369 on: October 15, 2013, 09:34:20 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!!  

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.

Well I'm glad there's one other person in the world who doesn't think I'm insane for going into science to avoid math.

What science? I listened to a guy who had some interesting ideas about changing how science is taught at University and high school level.

Doing science from time to time and seeing what actually succeeds, I couldn't help but agree.

He really believes risk and experimenting (in the pedestrian sense) should be more emphasized and that school should eschew intelligence since it seems at once you hit near genius levels of intelligence, as typically understood, you simply aren't going to be that great at science as you will likely lack the lower threshold for stimulation required to see tentative guesses through to their fruition. IOW, you will be a failed "idea man".

He also thought that with the more lax approach to doing, heavy emphasis should be put on record keeping as the play is done. Since meticulous recorded keeping is needed help weed out those who are terrible at it.

I see this being a balancing act which fails in the work I see, play vs. insane anal retentive record keeping. But this would likely get too specific and likely border on disclosing more than my contract would allow and likely be much more boring that what has preceded.
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« Reply #3370 on: October 15, 2013, 09:36:33 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!!  

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.

Well I'm glad there's one other person in the world who doesn't think I'm insane for going into science to avoid math.

What science? I listened to a guy who had some interesting ideas about changing how science is taught at University and high school level.

Doing science from time to time and seeing what actually succeeds, I couldn't help but agree.

He really believes risk and experimenting (in the pedestrian sense) should be more emphasized and that school should eschew intelligence since it seems at once you hit near genius levels of intelligence, as typically understood, you simply aren't going to be that great at science as you will likely lack the lower threshold for stimulation required to see tentative guesses through to their fruition. IOW, you will be a failed "idea man".

He also thought that with the more lax approach to doing, heavy emphasis should be put on record keeping as the play is done. Since meticulous recorded keeping is needed help weed out those who are terrible at it.

I see this being a balancing act which fails in the work I see, play vs. insane anal retentive record keeping. But this would likely get too specific and likely border on disclosing more than my contract would allow and likely be much more boring that what has preceded.
Can we have a serious discussion on why people champion these pseudo Science nerds on MythBusters?

I hate how people who do science well = them being a genius.

It's ridiculous. Science is a terrible marker on intelligence IMO.
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« Reply #3371 on: October 15, 2013, 09:37:54 PM »

What high school teaches inorganic chemistry??

I mean, beyond "this is Sodium, this is Boson, this is a Salt..."

Not high school, college.  I remember learning how to do certain calculations in high school, and then having to do the same in college via a different method.  I was able to get the right answer, but I was wrong because I couldn't do it their way.  I tried seeing the TA's for extra help, but they appeared to have been recent immigrants from China, and I couldn't understand their English through their accents.  Chemistry was fun in high school, but frustrating in college.  

So I went into theology.   Undecided

On the fun versus frustrating in college, see my other post. More than a few profs probably think you shudda haven't been run out of the sciences. The folks I have to work with in science who are old timers and very brilliant and successful say that once degrees over experience became emphasized quality of the R&D done went way down.

Theology? RLY? I had no idea. Good job.
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« Reply #3372 on: October 15, 2013, 09:46:13 PM »

say that once degrees over experience became emphasized quality of the R&D done went way down.
I've had this theory in my head for awhile now, that my generation, in order to justify their dumb decision in life (like that degree in anthropology), forcing everybody else to get one too. These companies are already ridiculous in selecting folks just for entree level jobs. Gotta have a bachelor's now to answer calls in a call center, say what?

I'd go with experience over a degree any day of the week.  Most college grads just went through the motions to get a piece of paper.
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« Reply #3373 on: October 15, 2013, 09:48:07 PM »

Theology? RLY? I had no idea. Good job.

Fixed it for you.  Tongue

I enjoyed the sciences in high school, but college ruined it for me.  I think I probably could've done well in a different type of setting, but maybe that's just wishful thinking.  Or is it?    
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« Reply #3374 on: October 15, 2013, 10:04:32 PM »

We had learned to do things one way in hs, but our professors wanted us to do it a different way in college.

That's what happened with me and inorganic chemistry!!  

In college, math professors want you to do math, unless you are incapable like engineering and science majors.

But most kidz nowdays get calc from a math / sci / engineering TAs at colleges.

Look out when analysis and abstract happens.

Well I'm glad there's one other person in the world who doesn't think I'm insane for going into science to avoid math.

What science? I listened to a guy who had some interesting ideas about changing how science is taught at University and high school level.

Doing science from time to time and seeing what actually succeeds, I couldn't help but agree.

He really believes risk and experimenting (in the pedestrian sense) should be more emphasized and that school should eschew intelligence since it seems at once you hit near genius levels of intelligence, as typically understood, you simply aren't going to be that great at science as you will likely lack the lower threshold for stimulation required to see tentative guesses through to their fruition. IOW, you will be a failed "idea man".

He also thought that with the more lax approach to doing, heavy emphasis should be put on record keeping as the play is done. Since meticulous recorded keeping is needed help weed out those who are terrible at it.

I see this being a balancing act which fails in the work I see, play vs. insane anal retentive record keeping. But this would likely get too specific and likely border on disclosing more than my contract would allow and likely be much more boring that what has preceded.

This is where I can say some good things about my school, even though it's not exactly in line with your guy's suggestion.

I studied Chemistry. And in the last couple of years, it was lab work up the wazoo. Not kiddie lab work, but actually doing research with grad students. It was where I learned EVERYTHING. And when the other kid persisted in messing things up and giving the illusion he had gotten anything done, he was "fired."

Sure, I perpetrated a few catastrophes myself. But it comes with the territory.
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