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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 389412 times) Average Rating: 5
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« Reply #2520 on: August 04, 2012, 08:23:44 AM »


In what language? I've been trying to take it easy this week after some insane weeks of work, so this has been my method of winding down a little before getting early and decent sleep all week.

Eco is a genius. The intro is pure brilliance.

Enjoy!

And Alpo, you seem like someone who wouldn't mind a little ESL help, although you hardly require it as your English is quite good.

In American English for the most part at least, we borrow books from a library which lends them to use.

Let me know what you think of the book!



Do'h! I should have noticed that. Thanks. I try not to think of grammar while writing or speaking in English since being a perfectionist I could spend ages polishing everything but the method has it's downsides.

My copy is in Finnish. I try to remember write something if I actually end up reading it.

No you are correct in your method. It is one I should've adopted when learning the languages I did.

It was just a friendly correction.

Let me know if the Finnish translator followed Eco's own intentionally left untranslated passages or fragments in everything that is not in Italian.

I liked the English translator's decision not to offer an English translation for the parts of the text within the text or in foot or endnotes.
Did you skip over the Latin parts or ?

It ain't just Latin.

The Latin isn't terribly difficult and neither are any of the other uses of foreign languages.

Frankly, I find keeping the politics in mind more difficult. I've always hated history as such. In any historical piece of fiction, that is what I find the most difficult.

The references to prevailing thought is a bit too cute and feels forced at times. But I think the overall narrative to be just clever enough and not given to extremity by much so-called post-modern literature.
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« Reply #2521 on: August 04, 2012, 11:10:02 AM »



(Yes, that really is the cover of the book.)

I am about to start Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic's book God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse. 
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« Reply #2522 on: August 04, 2012, 02:16:27 PM »

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« Reply #2523 on: August 04, 2012, 02:18:56 PM »



(Yes, that really is the cover of the book.)

I am about to start Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic's book God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse. 
That sounds awesome.
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« Reply #2524 on: August 04, 2012, 02:19:25 PM »

(Yes, that really is the cover of the book.)

I am about to start Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic's book God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse. 

I may like this cover. I am undecided. Hmm...
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« Reply #2525 on: August 04, 2012, 02:45:26 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.
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« Reply #2526 on: August 04, 2012, 02:50:06 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.

My good friend, may I recommend you "The Latin Syntax" by prof. Samolewicz...
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« Reply #2527 on: August 04, 2012, 03:53:27 PM »

How to post a picture of the cover?
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« Reply #2528 on: August 04, 2012, 04:05:43 PM »

In the middle column of command icons, second from left is a picture of a... picture Wink . Click on it, then you'll get this thing: (img) (/img), although in square brackets. Simply paste the link to the picture in space between middle square brackets (img)here(/img).
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« Reply #2529 on: August 04, 2012, 04:11:38 PM »

Thank you, it was a tough one Wink
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« Reply #2530 on: August 04, 2012, 04:16:14 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.



Boringest book I ever read.
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« Reply #2531 on: August 04, 2012, 04:58:24 PM »



RIP. His earlier work and shorter fiction is better, but a worthy read nonetheless.
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« Reply #2532 on: August 04, 2012, 04:59:28 PM »

Anyone has a profile on Goodreads?
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« Reply #2533 on: August 04, 2012, 05:05:57 PM »



(Yes, that really is the cover of the book.)

I am about to start Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic's book God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse. 

Zizek ripped off 28% of what he writes and says from me. Of his popular material 71%.

He and Eminem took my identity and split it in half and did a lot more with the half they had than I did with the whole I had. Like a lot, lot more.

Since you are starting to read him, you have no reason to keep talking to me.

So long and enjoy my company.


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« Reply #2534 on: August 04, 2012, 05:25:07 PM »

I just went to Barnes and Noble to check that book James Rottnek posted and read the introduction by Boris. Wow that was incredible. I was going to buy it but B&N wants 20 bucks for it when I can get it for 13 on amazon, bleh.

And I'm scared to death to read Proust at the moment.
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« Reply #2535 on: August 04, 2012, 05:28:24 PM »

Anyone has a profile on Goodreads?

I have one on LibraryThing, though no books are currently listed  Cool
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« Reply #2536 on: August 04, 2012, 05:29:23 PM »

Zizek ripped off 28% of what he writes and says from me. Of his popular material 71%.

He and Eminem took my identity and split it in half and did a lot more with the half they had than I did with the whole I had. Like a lot, lot more.

Since you are starting to read him, you have no reason to keep talking to me.

So long and enjoy my company.



Ah I thought you had some Slim Shady resemblances.
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« Reply #2537 on: August 04, 2012, 06:31:23 PM »

Zizek ripped off 28% of what he writes and says from me. Of his popular material 71%.

He and Eminem took my identity and split it in half and did a lot more with the half they had than I did with the whole I had. Like a lot, lot more.

Since you are starting to read him, you have no reason to keep talking to me.

So long and enjoy my company.



Ah I thought you had some Slim Shady resemblances.

It's worser than you know.
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« Reply #2538 on: August 04, 2012, 10:14:51 PM »

I just went to Barnes and Noble to check that book James Rottnek posted and read the introduction by Boris. Wow that was incredible. I was going to buy it but B&N wants 20 bucks for it when I can get it for 13 on amazon, bleh.

And I'm scared to death to read Proust at the moment.
Let me add that I think it is very unsettling that Boris brings up the Divine Comedy when I wanted to organize an OC.net reading.
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« Reply #2539 on: August 04, 2012, 11:26:10 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.

Anything by Lossky makes me sleepy.
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« Reply #2540 on: August 04, 2012, 11:26:10 PM »



(Yes, that really is the cover of the book.)

I am about to start Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic's book God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse. 

Zizek ripped off 28% of what he writes and says from me. Of his popular material 71%.

He and Eminem took my identity and split it in half and did a lot more with the half they had than I did with the whole I had. Like a lot, lot more.

Since you are starting to read him, you have no reason to keep talking to me.

So long and enjoy my company.




You don't know how hard I laughed.
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« Reply #2541 on: August 05, 2012, 10:50:31 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.

Anything by Lossky makes me sleepy.

You have not yet acquired an Orthodox phronema!  Tongue
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« Reply #2542 on: August 05, 2012, 11:19:18 PM »

I need some books that when reading them put you instantly to sleep.

Anything by Lossky makes me sleepy.

You have not yet acquired an Orthodox phronema!  Tongue

The funny thing is, I found both Orthodox Dogmatic Theology by Protopresbyter Michael Pomazansky, and An Overview of Orthodox Canon Law by Met. Rodopoulos to be rather interesting, and not sleep-inducing in the least.
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« Reply #2543 on: August 06, 2012, 12:54:29 AM »

The funny thing is, I found both Orthodox Dogmatic Theology by Protopresbyter Michael Pomazansky, and An Overview of Orthodox Canon Law by Met. Rodopoulos to be rather interesting, and not sleep-inducing in the least.

I didn't mind Dogmatic theology by Fr. Michael (and didn't Fr. Seraphim have some stuff in there as well?), but the Canon Law one, well I gave my thoughts on that one before. I do agree though that Lossky can get a boring at times though.
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« Reply #2544 on: August 06, 2012, 02:54:29 PM »

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« Reply #2545 on: August 06, 2012, 03:26:33 PM »

The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ: Selected Writings from St. Maximus the Confessor.
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« Reply #2546 on: August 06, 2012, 03:36:05 PM »

The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ: Selected Writings from St. Maximus the Confessor.
Do want.

And I have Orthodox Dogmatic Theology as well, I love it.
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« Reply #2547 on: August 06, 2012, 03:59:32 PM »

The Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ: Selected Writings from St. Maximus the Confessor.
Do want.

It's very interesting, even if the first thing I understood was on page 47.
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« Reply #2548 on: August 06, 2012, 04:37:20 PM »



Where do you find the time for everything you do?

Sheesh.
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« Reply #2549 on: August 06, 2012, 09:35:00 PM »


Where do you find the time for everything you do?

Sheesh.

I'm quite scatter-brained... if I don't have seven things going at once I get bored easily.
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« Reply #2550 on: August 06, 2012, 10:35:36 PM »

Possessed by Thomas B. Allen

http://www.amazon.com/Possessed-Thomas-Allen/dp/0595132642


Good book with some insightful Catholic theology in it, but why do I keep reading it while I fall asleep? Nightmares man!



Selam
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« Reply #2551 on: August 06, 2012, 10:57:48 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.
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« Reply #2552 on: August 06, 2012, 11:09:25 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.


I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.


Selam
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« Reply #2553 on: August 06, 2012, 11:21:23 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.


I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.


Selam
I thought maybe that she had interviewed you. Shocked
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« Reply #2554 on: August 06, 2012, 11:40:46 PM »


Where do you find the time for everything you do?

Sheesh.

I'm quite scatter-brained... if I don't have seven things going at once I get bored easily.
Scatter brains...unite!...wait I'm a little scattered over here
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« Reply #2555 on: August 07, 2012, 01:20:11 AM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!



I really enjoy Hermann Hesse, but the translation I got is a bit cumbersome, still a superb work at the level of Siddhartha, but nonetheless hindered by the translation.  I relate to Hesse like an esoteric Hunter Thompson meets the pragmatism of Joseph Campbell.

stay blessed,
habte selassie
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« Reply #2556 on: August 07, 2012, 08:34:59 AM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.
I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.
Selam
The text addresses how many converts were "seekers" in the spiritual marketplace that is modern America, with so many religious choices available (and how this "seeker" mentality" may or may not remain present even while Orthodox). The chapters focus on the process of catechesis and socialization for converts, the motivations that converts have for converting (with different motivations for true-blood "seekers" and those who enter Orthodoxy via spouses), the role of Orthodox ritual in the convert life, and convert responses to ethnicity issues. The author often compares cradle Orthodox with converts, noting the often more "rigorous" Orthodoxy of the convert meeting/clashing with a more "open-ended" Orthodoxy of the cradles.

Most of her focus was on the Orthodox converts in Pittsburgh, but she has a chapter on Jackson. Here's one excerpt:

Quote
Not only did the Mississippi converts characterize southerners, in general, as more open to discussing God and religious faith, they themselves more frequently referenced classic elements of Christian life and cosmology -- such as heaven, hell, and salvation -- than their Pittsburgh counterparts. Significantly, the Jackson informants described their relationships to the church and the divine also in much more emotionally diffuse and open terms. For example, a much higher percentage of the Mississippi converts (40 percent) wept in the course of relation their conversion stories, as compared to 10 percent of the northern informants. In discussing their newfound Orthodox faith, the converts were often clearly drawing upon the conceptual frameworks and vocabularies of former confessions and evangelical sensibilities. One informant, for example, remarked that, if nothing else, her "Baptist heritage" had taught her that "there will be an accounting," an accounting wholly compatible with her present Orthodox church membership. She explained, "There will be an accounting for people for what they do, say, and justify. Am I making sense? Do you know where I'm coming from? There will be an accounting. There will be a Judgment Day and I'm so glad to be Orthodox. I'm sure there will be things I'll answer for like everybody. I'm not a perfect person by any means. But, I want to be in my shoes on Judgment Day." [150]
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« Reply #2557 on: August 08, 2012, 04:55:26 AM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.
I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.
Selam
The text addresses how many converts were "seekers" in the spiritual marketplace that is modern America, with so many religious choices available (and how this "seeker" mentality" may or may not remain present even while Orthodox). The chapters focus on the process of catechesis and socialization for converts, the motivations that converts have for converting (with different motivations for true-blood "seekers" and those who enter Orthodoxy via spouses), the role of Orthodox ritual in the convert life, and convert responses to ethnicity issues. The author often compares cradle Orthodox with converts, noting the often more "rigorous" Orthodoxy of the convert meeting/clashing with a more "open-ended" Orthodoxy of the cradles.

Most of her focus was on the Orthodox converts in Pittsburgh, but she has a chapter on Jackson. Here's one excerpt:

Quote
Not only did the Mississippi converts characterize southerners, in general, as more open to discussing God and religious faith, they themselves more frequently referenced classic elements of Christian life and cosmology -- such as heaven, hell, and salvation -- than their Pittsburgh counterparts. Significantly, the Jackson informants described their relationships to the church and the divine also in much more emotionally diffuse and open terms. For example, a much higher percentage of the Mississippi converts (40 percent) wept in the course of relation their conversion stories, as compared to 10 percent of the northern informants. In discussing their newfound Orthodox faith, the converts were often clearly drawing upon the conceptual frameworks and vocabularies of former confessions and evangelical sensibilities. One informant, for example, remarked that, if nothing else, her "Baptist heritage" had taught her that "there will be an accounting," an accounting wholly compatible with her present Orthodox church membership. She explained, "There will be an accounting for people for what they do, say, and justify. Am I making sense? Do you know where I'm coming from? There will be an accounting. There will be a Judgment Day and I'm so glad to be Orthodox. I'm sure there will be things I'll answer for like everybody. I'm not a perfect person by any means. But, I want to be in my shoes on Judgment Day." [150]


Interesting. I haven't noticed the same trend, but I'm sure there may be some merit to it. Thanks for sharing that excerpt.

Selam
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« Reply #2558 on: August 08, 2012, 02:09:12 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.
I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.
Selam
The text addresses how many converts were "seekers" in the spiritual marketplace that is modern America, with so many religious choices available (and how this "seeker" mentality" may or may not remain present even while Orthodox). The chapters focus on the process of catechesis and socialization for converts, the motivations that converts have for converting (with different motivations for true-blood "seekers" and those who enter Orthodoxy via spouses), the role of Orthodox ritual in the convert life, and convert responses to ethnicity issues. The author often compares cradle Orthodox with converts, noting the often more "rigorous" Orthodoxy of the convert meeting/clashing with a more "open-ended" Orthodoxy of the cradles.

Most of her focus was on the Orthodox converts in Pittsburgh, but she has a chapter on Jackson. Here's one excerpt:

Quote
Not only did the Mississippi converts characterize southerners, in general, as more open to discussing God and religious faith, they themselves more frequently referenced classic elements of Christian life and cosmology -- such as heaven, hell, and salvation -- than their Pittsburgh counterparts. Significantly, the Jackson informants described their relationships to the church and the divine also in much more emotionally diffuse and open terms. For example, a much higher percentage of the Mississippi converts (40 percent) wept in the course of relation their conversion stories, as compared to 10 percent of the northern informants. In discussing their newfound Orthodox faith, the converts were often clearly drawing upon the conceptual frameworks and vocabularies of former confessions and evangelical sensibilities. One informant, for example, remarked that, if nothing else, her "Baptist heritage" had taught her that "there will be an accounting," an accounting wholly compatible with her present Orthodox church membership. She explained, "There will be an accounting for people for what they do, say, and justify. Am I making sense? Do you know where I'm coming from? There will be an accounting. There will be a Judgment Day and I'm so glad to be Orthodox. I'm sure there will be things I'll answer for like everybody. I'm not a perfect person by any means. But, I want to be in my shoes on Judgment Day." [150]

This is probably not a very good attitude to have.
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« Reply #2559 on: August 09, 2012, 12:12:38 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.


I live in Jackson, MS.

We need to meet up sometime. lol
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« Reply #2560 on: August 10, 2012, 06:03:22 PM »

I drove to a neighboring town to grab a couple books they have at their library...





Somewhat refreshers. I've read the St. John book 3-4 times now, but it's a great book. I've also read many of the selections in the first one (Vl. Lossky, Fr. Georges Florovsky, etc.), but about half the book has essays I haven't read yet.
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« Reply #2561 on: August 10, 2012, 06:14:49 PM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.
I live in Jackson, MS. I'd be interested to know what it says about us.
Selam
The text addresses how many converts were "seekers" in the spiritual marketplace that is modern America, with so many religious choices available (and how this "seeker" mentality" may or may not remain present even while Orthodox). The chapters focus on the process of catechesis and socialization for converts, the motivations that converts have for converting (with different motivations for true-blood "seekers" and those who enter Orthodoxy via spouses), the role of Orthodox ritual in the convert life, and convert responses to ethnicity issues. The author often compares cradle Orthodox with converts, noting the often more "rigorous" Orthodoxy of the convert meeting/clashing with a more "open-ended" Orthodoxy of the cradles.

Most of her focus was on the Orthodox converts in Pittsburgh, but she has a chapter on Jackson. Here's one excerpt:

Quote
Not only did the Mississippi converts characterize southerners, in general, as more open to discussing God and religious faith, they themselves more frequently referenced classic elements of Christian life and cosmology -- such as heaven, hell, and salvation -- than their Pittsburgh counterparts. Significantly, the Jackson informants described their relationships to the church and the divine also in much more emotionally diffuse and open terms. For example, a much higher percentage of the Mississippi converts (40 percent) wept in the course of relation their conversion stories, as compared to 10 percent of the northern informants. In discussing their newfound Orthodox faith, the converts were often clearly drawing upon the conceptual frameworks and vocabularies of former confessions and evangelical sensibilities. One informant, for example, remarked that, if nothing else, her "Baptist heritage" had taught her that "there will be an accounting," an accounting wholly compatible with her present Orthodox church membership. She explained, "There will be an accounting for people for what they do, say, and justify. Am I making sense? Do you know where I'm coming from? There will be an accounting. There will be a Judgment Day and I'm so glad to be Orthodox. I'm sure there will be things I'll answer for like everybody. I'm not a perfect person by any means. But, I want to be in my shoes on Judgment Day." [150]

This is probably not a very good attitude to have.

You ain't seen the kicks I sport then.
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« Reply #2562 on: August 11, 2012, 04:23:32 AM »

The Eastern Church in the Spiritual Marketplace: American Conversions to Orthodox Christianity, by Amy Slagle. Slagle conducted participant observation and formal semi-structured interviews in Orthodox churches in Pittsburgh, PA -- the "Holy Land" of North American Orthodoxy -- and Jackson, MS, in the Bible Belt -- where the Orthodox Church in American has marshaled significant resources to build mission parishes.


I live in Jackson, MS.

We need to meet up sometime. lol

A day in New Orleans would be fun. I haven't been down there since Katrina. I need to go. PM me and we'll try to work something out.


Selam
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« Reply #2563 on: August 18, 2012, 01:42:09 PM »

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« Reply #2564 on: August 18, 2012, 02:41:36 PM »

I am about to read "Wheat Belly" which is now a best seller. I have seen the author's full lecture on-line.

Wheat drives appetite. Wheat has been so hybridized that it no longer resembles the original plant, the stuff that people made bread out of in biblical times.. It has something akin to an opiate within it , so it is addicting.

One slice of whole wheat bread spikes your insulin higher than a spoon full of table sugar or a bowel of Ice Cream.
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