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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 373342 times) Average Rating: 5
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« Reply #2160 on: January 11, 2012, 05:57:03 PM »

I'm not enjoying my books. I feel we should start a book exchange then i could swap them for something more interesting. It could be a secret book exchange then you wouldn't know what you'd be getting.

 laugh
As long as you promise me nothing by Danielle Steele.
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« Reply #2161 on: January 11, 2012, 06:30:50 PM »

I'm not enjoying my books. I feel we should start a book exchange then i could swap them for something more interesting. It could be a secret book exchange then you wouldn't know what you'd be getting.

 laugh
As long as you promise me nothing by Danielle Steele.

What about Stieg Larsson?
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« Reply #2162 on: January 12, 2012, 10:48:01 PM »

We've got all his books here at the house. Thrillers aren't really my thing, I guess. I tend to stick to the classics for some reason.
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« Reply #2163 on: January 12, 2012, 11:26:42 PM »

I'm not enjoying my books. I feel we should start a book exchange then i could swap them for something more interesting. It could be a secret book exchange then you wouldn't know what you'd be getting.

 laugh

HECK YES.

What about Stieg Larsson?

This is also a yes.
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« Reply #2164 on: January 14, 2012, 11:52:42 AM »

Right now, I'm reading Rome and the Eastern Churches by Aidan Nichols.
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« Reply #2165 on: January 14, 2012, 05:19:16 PM »

I'm almost done with the audiobook of "The Stonehenge Legacy," by Sam Christer. It's really good.  Smiley
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« Reply #2166 on: January 16, 2012, 09:43:27 PM »



evharistijsko bogoslovlje, A.Šmeman
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« Reply #2167 on: January 18, 2012, 04:53:45 PM »

An Open Life: Joseph Campbell In Conversation With Michael Toms, ed. by Maher and Briggs
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« Reply #2168 on: January 18, 2012, 04:54:29 PM »

Right now, I'm reading Rome and the Eastern Churches by Aidan Nichols.

What do you think of it?
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« Reply #2169 on: January 18, 2012, 05:00:53 PM »

I'm re-reading Lewis' Four Loves and Vernor Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep," with a little of GK Chesterton's "Hilaire Belloc: The Man and His Work" on the side when I can manage it.
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« Reply #2170 on: January 18, 2012, 05:21:27 PM »

"Rapture" by David B. Currie.
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« Reply #2171 on: January 18, 2012, 09:39:22 PM »

How much do y'all tend to read a day?

Asteriktos, anything to report on that Genesis book you were reading?

Also, anybody here read any John Lennox? Is he any good as an apologist?
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« Reply #2172 on: January 18, 2012, 09:42:03 PM »

Just started this morning...



How is that? Does it support the idear that the Fathers all believed in a pretty literal creation narrative?

If memory serves, St Basil mentioned that not all of the Old Testament is to be taken literally. However, I do not recall where I read this.

But, if someone is going to be making such an ahistorical argument that literal understanding of the Bible were the norm throughout the Church, then referring to the works of learned Church Fathers would not help anyway since the person is choosing to only listen to history that they agree with.

What do you think of Fr. Seraphim Rose's work on the topic, Father?
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« Reply #2173 on: January 18, 2012, 10:00:28 PM »

How much do y'all tend to read a day?

Asteriktos, anything to report on that Genesis book you were reading?

For me reading varies, some days I might read 5 hours, some days none. It all depends on what I'm doing, what books I'm reading etc. Perhaps the biggest factor is whether I'm reading something for pleasure/learning or for research... if it's for the latter it takes a lot longer because not only am I writing down notes from the book, but often I end up writing a page of thoughts that came to me because of the line or two from the book.

Regarding the Beginnings book, I am about half way done with it, having got through the stuff on St. Paul, and the early Christian apologists. I plan on writing a review of certain elements of it* when I'm finished with it. Fwiw here's are two snippets that I think capture the overall spirit/tone of the work:

"Paul was not averse to the sporadic use of allegory, but he did not allegorize Adam. Yet he is finally uninterested in the question of who Adam is, caring only about what Adam is and the role he plays in counterpoint to Christ... So Paul's Adam is the first in a lineage of sin and, through sin, death. Linking Adam's function with his primordial setting makes him, in effect, chiefly a symbol: he is a stand-in for (fallen) humanity in general and subsequently a type for Christ, an icon of the 'old self' that is to be put off in favor of the new. Yet given Adam's genealogical significance, he is at least implicitly a person before he is a symbol." - Peter C. Bouteneff, Beginnings: Ancient Christian Readings of the Biblical Creation Narratives, (Baker Academic, 2008), p. 40

"Certainly Paul came to focus on Adam as a result of his finding Christ. Although it would be difficult to say that Paul bears the sole responsibility for the movement towards typological readings of the OT, his readings of the OT as illuminated by and illuminating Christ was groundbreaking and became the guiding rubric under which the Christian fathers read Scripture. Saying that 'the rock was Christ' or that Adam is a type of Christ stems from Paul's reading of the function of the entire (OT) Scripture. As he shows in 2 Corthinians 3:12-4:7, to read Scripture sheerly in chronological terms, as a history of the world or as a story of the nation of Israel, is to have a veil over one's eyes. One lifts the veil when one turns to the Lord (3:16). The Scriptures are about Christ, the treasure who lies within the clay jars (4:7)." - Ibid., p. 46


* I wouldn't call it a book review as I don't intend it to be an overview of the entire book, but rather just some info on his approach regarding literal vs. non-literal interpretations.
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« Reply #2174 on: January 18, 2012, 11:13:48 PM »

Finished the 30 Years War : Europe's Tragedy.  Now taking a break and reading the Count of Monte Cristo.  Fun book.
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« Reply #2175 on: January 21, 2012, 02:15:16 AM »

War with the Newts by Karel Capek (not about Newt Gingrich lol)

For school I've got a bunch of history articles and excerpts from The Birth of Tragedy by Nietszche (for my Aesthetics course).
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« Reply #2176 on: January 24, 2012, 07:50:05 PM »

In the mail today arrived an order from the monks with soap for the wife and "Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy" by Fr Damick then about an hour later my neighbor stops in and gives me a UPS package that was mine (delivered wrong) "On Pascha" by Melito of Sardis...but these have to wait till I'm through "St Silouan the Athonite" by Elder Sophrony...EO reading list isn't getting any shorter lol.
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« Reply #2177 on: January 24, 2012, 08:13:59 PM »

EO reading list isn't getting any shorter lol.

Haha, and it only gets worse as time goes on! Smiley
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« Reply #2178 on: January 24, 2012, 08:31:14 PM »

EO reading list isn't getting any shorter lol.

Haha, and it only gets worse as time goes on! Smiley

Man, can I empathize...

My Orthodox neighbor lent me a dozen books on Orthodoxy a few months ago. I got a little overexcited and tried reading like four of them at once. Have yet to finish three of them.  Smiley
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« Reply #2179 on: January 24, 2012, 09:58:40 PM »

"The Memoirs of Cleopatra, a Novel" by Margaret George.  Rather interesting fictional read. And the price was right, only a dollar at my favorite used book store on 39th street! 
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« Reply #2180 on: January 24, 2012, 10:26:00 PM »

EO reading list isn't getting any shorter lol.

Haha, and it only gets worse as time goes on! Smiley

Man, can I empathize...

My Orthodox neighbor lent me a dozen books on Orthodoxy a few months ago. I got a little overexcited and tried reading like four of them at once. Have yet to finish three of them.  Smiley
I can keep a couple books going at a time as long as one is fiction~don't do well with too many "serious" books on the go unless they are very different subjects.  Fiction I'm reading at bedtime is the "Belgariad" series by Eddings (maybe the 5th time through in the past 15 years lol).
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« Reply #2181 on: January 24, 2012, 10:30:45 PM »

Aftershock by Robert Reich.
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« Reply #2182 on: January 25, 2012, 05:29:22 PM »

Right now, I'm reading Rome and the Eastern Churches by Aidan Nichols.

What do you think of it?

It was quite good I thought. I just finished it today. He gives a nice brief history of the schisms of the Assyrian Church and the Non-Chalcedonians and discusses what Rome is doing to attempt reunification with them. He goes much more in depth concerning the Eastern Orthodox providing information on the main causes of the schism (cultural, political, and theological) and attempts at reunification. His information on "Uniatism" (I know it is a naughty word here, but it is the word he uses) is fascinating. I think it is a good study and a good read. I think his assertion that the Orthodox and the Catholics need each other makes sense. The Orthodox need Rome to help combat the Orthodox Church's nationalistic problems and administrative mess; Rome needs the Orthodox to help combat liberalism and renovationist tendencies on their own front in order to insure that authentic Catholicism prospers.

I recommend it.
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« Reply #2183 on: January 25, 2012, 05:34:53 PM »

I've been reading Ovid and Catullus off and on.  I have a copy of the Aeneid on the shelf.  After a conversation with scamandrius on Sunday I might give it a read.
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« Reply #2184 on: January 25, 2012, 07:18:58 PM »

Right now, I'm reading Rome and the Eastern Churches by Aidan Nichols.

What do you think of it?

It was quite good I thought. I just finished it today. He gives a nice brief history of the schisms of the Assyrian Church and the Non-Chalcedonians and discusses what Rome is doing to attempt reunification with them. He goes much more in depth concerning the Eastern Orthodox providing information on the main causes of the schism (cultural, political, and theological) and attempts at reunification. His information on "Uniatism" (I know it is a naughty word here, but it is the word he uses) is fascinating. I think it is a good study and a good read. I think his assertion that the Orthodox and the Catholics need each other makes sense. The Orthodox need Rome to help combat the Orthodox Church's nationalistic problems and administrative mess; Rome needs the Orthodox to help combat liberalism and renovationist tendencies on their own front in order to insure that authentic Catholicism prospers.

I recommend it.

Cool, thanks for the overview Smiley
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« Reply #2185 on: January 25, 2012, 08:27:23 PM »

One of the most wonderful Orthodox books worth reading is "Recollection" by Theophan the Recluse. It helps a great deal to retain peace and continues prayer.
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« Reply #2186 on: January 25, 2012, 09:20:28 PM »

Books One and Two of The New Organum by Francis Bacon

You May Ask Yourself: Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist by Dalton Conley
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« Reply #2187 on: January 25, 2012, 11:43:51 PM »

Right now, I'm reading Rome and the Eastern Churches by Aidan Nichols.

What do you think of it?

It was quite good I thought. I just finished it today. He gives a nice brief history of the schisms of the Assyrian Church and the Non-Chalcedonians and discusses what Rome is doing to attempt reunification with them. He goes much more in depth concerning the Eastern Orthodox providing information on the main causes of the schism (cultural, political, and theological) and attempts at reunification. His information on "Uniatism" (I know it is a naughty word here, but it is the word he uses) is fascinating. I think it is a good study and a good read. I think his assertion that the Orthodox and the Catholics need each other makes sense. The Orthodox need Rome to help combat the Orthodox Church's nationalistic problems and administrative mess; Rome needs the Orthodox to help combat liberalism and renovationist tendencies on their own front in order to insure that authentic Catholicism prospers.

I recommend it.

Cool, thanks for the overview Smiley

You're welcome.  Smiley
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« Reply #2188 on: January 27, 2012, 12:06:41 AM »

Today, I started reading Contemplative Prayer by Thomas Merton. I also plan to start reading Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization by Richard Miles tomorrow.
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« Reply #2189 on: January 27, 2012, 12:10:27 AM »

We've been reading Lord of the Flies for school. Pretty good.
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« Reply #2190 on: January 27, 2012, 03:02:11 AM »

Most of my reading this semester will be books for my classes. Got a readings seminar on classics in military history which means I'll be reading books like Clausewitz' On War, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Thucydides, Ulysses S. Grant's Memoirs, and more. Also have classes on the French Enlightenment and also Tudor & Stewart England. Many books and readings from books there as well, and there's also the books I must read for my various papers in those classes. I could have ~35 books read by the end of the semester (not word-for-word certainly, but I will definitely be familiar with them).

As for books that are purely my choice: I have Jean Francois Revel's Last Exit to Utopia, an anthology titled Europe in 1848 edited by Dieter Dowe, and I may pick up Mark Levin's Ameritopia. It is almost certain that I won't be finishing these this semester (that anthology is 937 pages not including index and bibliography), but they are what I am definitely planning to read at some point this year.

For light stuff, I'll just be reading some manga. Hayate the Combat Butler is my favorite, though I also like Toradora and Durarara!, among a few others.
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« Reply #2191 on: January 27, 2012, 05:26:10 PM »

Most of my reading this semester will be books for my classes. Got a readings seminar on classics in military history which means I'll be reading books like Clausewitz' On War, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Thucydides, Ulysses S. Grant's Memoirs, and more. Also have classes on the French Enlightenment and also Tudor & Stewart England. Many books and readings from books there as well, and there's also the books I must read for my various papers in those classes. I could have ~35 books read by the end of the semester (not word-for-word certainly, but I will definitely be familiar with them).

As for books that are purely my choice: I have Jean Francois Revel's Last Exit to Utopia, an anthology titled Europe in 1848 edited by Dieter Dowe, and I may pick up Mark Levin's Ameritopia. It is almost certain that I won't be finishing these this semester (that anthology is 937 pages not including index and bibliography), but they are what I am definitely planning to read at some point this year.

For light stuff, I'll just be reading some manga. Hayate the Combat Butler is my favorite, though I also like Toradora and Durarara!, among a few others.

Vom Krieg is pretty dry.  It's also pretty thick.  Have fun. 

Thucydides is a pretty good read, I thought.  I read a lot of him in College.  If you are interested you might pick up Xenophon's Hellenica, it picks up where Thucydides leaves off.  One little gem is that Thucydides makes at least one mention of his own actions in the Amphipolis campaign - in the third person!
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« Reply #2192 on: January 27, 2012, 08:56:07 PM »

Most of my reading this semester will be books for my classes. Got a readings seminar on classics in military history which means I'll be reading books like Clausewitz' On War, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Thucydides, Ulysses S. Grant's Memoirs, and more. Also have classes on the French Enlightenment and also Tudor & Stewart England. Many books and readings from books there as well, and there's also the books I must read for my various papers in those classes. I could have ~35 books read by the end of the semester (not word-for-word certainly, but I will definitely be familiar with them).

As for books that are purely my choice: I have Jean Francois Revel's Last Exit to Utopia, an anthology titled Europe in 1848 edited by Dieter Dowe, and I may pick up Mark Levin's Ameritopia. It is almost certain that I won't be finishing these this semester (that anthology is 937 pages not including index and bibliography), but they are what I am definitely planning to read at some point this year.

For light stuff, I'll just be reading some manga. Hayate the Combat Butler is my favorite, though I also like Toradora and Durarara!, among a few others.

Vom Krieg is pretty dry.  It's also pretty thick.  Have fun. 

Thucydides is a pretty good read, I thought.  I read a lot of him in College.  If you are interested you might pick up Xenophon's Hellenica, it picks up where Thucydides leaves off.  One little gem is that Thucydides makes at least one mention of his own actions in the Amphipolis campaign - in the third person!
When discussing the fact that we'd have to read On War, our professor made his fingers into the shape of a gun and put it in his mouth. Tongue

Before I settled on studying American Indians, I was very seriously considering the history of ancient Rome and Greece. I'm familiar with both Xenophon and Thucydides, but I'm a little rusty, heh.
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« Reply #2193 on: January 27, 2012, 11:01:08 PM »

Most of my reading this semester will be books for my classes. Got a readings seminar on classics in military history which means I'll be reading books like Clausewitz' On War, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Thucydides, Ulysses S. Grant's Memoirs, and more. Also have classes on the French Enlightenment and also Tudor & Stewart England. Many books and readings from books there as well, and there's also the books I must read for my various papers in those classes. I could have ~35 books read by the end of the semester (not word-for-word certainly, but I will definitely be familiar with them).

As for books that are purely my choice: I have Jean Francois Revel's Last Exit to Utopia, an anthology titled Europe in 1848 edited by Dieter Dowe, and I may pick up Mark Levin's Ameritopia. It is almost certain that I won't be finishing these this semester (that anthology is 937 pages not including index and bibliography), but they are what I am definitely planning to read at some point this year.

For light stuff, I'll just be reading some manga. Hayate the Combat Butler is my favorite, though I also like Toradora and Durarara!, among a few others.

Vom Krieg is pretty dry.  It's also pretty thick.  Have fun. 

Thucydides is a pretty good read, I thought.  I read a lot of him in College.  If you are interested you might pick up Xenophon's Hellenica, it picks up where Thucydides leaves off.  One little gem is that Thucydides makes at least one mention of his own actions in the Amphipolis campaign - in the third person!
When discussing the fact that we'd have to read On War, our professor made his fingers into the shape of a gun and put it in his mouth. Tongue

Before I settled on studying American Indians, I was very seriously considering the history of ancient Rome and Greece. I'm familiar with both Xenophon and Thucydides, but I'm a little rusty, heh.

Greeks and Romans were my forte back in the day.  I took a four or five year hiatus but am getting back into reading the Classics.
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« Reply #2194 on: January 28, 2012, 12:33:00 AM »


Greeks and Romans were my forte back in the day.  I took a four or five year hiatus but am getting back into reading the Classics.
Well, even now, I'm a bit of a Romanophile. Love reading about the history and culture of ancient Rome. I even went as far as to take 4 classes in Latin. Greece also interests me, just not as much.
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« Reply #2195 on: January 29, 2012, 01:20:08 AM »

The Way of a Pilgrim, and A Pilgrim Continues His Way - Needed some less academic reading to go with other books I'm reading now, so I started this one again, probably for about the 5th time. The last few times haven't been that helpful/impactful... hopefully things will go better this time.
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« Reply #2196 on: January 31, 2012, 10:25:12 PM »

I haven't updated this in awhile.

Historical: American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson

Spiritual: The Way of the Spirit: Reflection on Life in God

Personal: LOTR (Two Towers presently)

Good ones I've recently finished: (Besides the Hobbit, which needs no assistance in promotion.)
Triumvirate: The Story of the Unlikely Alliance That Saved the Constitution and United the Nation  (although the writing is a bit choppy, I was fascinated by the story of the behind-the-scenes work that went into ensuring the Constitution's passage in the various state conventions)

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President (from Metropolitan Savas' recommendations, and a fantastic story)

Beauty for Ashes: The Spiritual Transformation of a Modern Greek Community (a great work on what kind of foundation a spiritual Christian community needs)
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« Reply #2197 on: February 03, 2012, 12:51:37 AM »

Moby Dick with annotations:

http://www.powermobydick.com/
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« Reply #2198 on: February 03, 2012, 02:07:58 AM »

Moby Dick

Excellent choice!  I hope you enjoy it. I can't adequately put into words how much I did.
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« Reply #2199 on: February 03, 2012, 02:10:53 AM »

Moby Dick

Excellent choice!  I hope you enjoy it. I can't adequately put into words how much I did.
What do you think of that website I linked?
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« Reply #2200 on: February 03, 2012, 02:26:35 AM »

About 30 pages left in The Mountain of Silence.  I've never read anything by this author before (Kyriacos C. Markides), though he's written several books.  Overall, it is pretty good, but Mr. (Dr.?  He's a professor in an American university, so I'd imagine he has a Ph.D., but I'm not 100% certain) Markides does in spots seem to make odd inferences and writes more than a couple bizarre things.
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« Reply #2201 on: February 03, 2012, 02:38:24 AM »

About 30 pages left in The Mountain of Silence.  I've never read anything by this author before (Kyriacos C. Markides), though he's written several books.  Overall, it is pretty good, but Mr. (Dr.?  He's a professor in an American university, so I'd imagine he has a Ph.D., but I'm not 100% certain) Markides does in spots seem to make odd inferences and writes more than a couple bizarre things.

I'm about 10 pages deep but kind of tossed it aside for now. I don't like his style of writing.
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« Reply #2202 on: February 03, 2012, 02:42:43 AM »

Moby Dick
Excellent choice!  I hope you enjoy it. I can't adequately put into words how much I did.
What do you think of that website I linked?

It seems quite interesting. The books I've read have been fairly well annotated (footnotes I believe), but not like that.  The format of the site would actually distract me from the story, but if you can avoid that, great.  I'll certainly use that website in the future, to pick up on terms and meanings that I've previously missed.
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« Reply #2203 on: February 03, 2012, 02:48:58 AM »

About 30 pages left in The Mountain of Silence.  I've never read anything by this author before (Kyriacos C. Markides), though he's written several books.  Overall, it is pretty good, but Mr. (Dr.?  He's a professor in an American university, so I'd imagine he has a Ph.D., but I'm not 100% certain) Markides does in spots seem to make odd inferences and writes more than a couple bizarre things.

I'm about 10 pages deep but kind of tossed it aside for now. I don't like his style of writing.

When he gets to the part of the book where he spends an entire spring in Cyprus (I think it starts in the third chapter, or second half of second chapter - so you're almost there) he begins quote very heavily from Fr. Maximos, to the point that the book is probably 70% Fr. Maximos' words (if not more), and his writing style does start to improve.  Of course, I didn't mind it too much to begin with, but I think you might be glad if you give the book some time.
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I know a secret about a former Supreme Court Justice.  Can you guess what it is?

The greatest tragedy in the world is when a cigarette ends.

American Spirits - the eco-friendly cigarette.

Preston Robert Kinney (September 8th, 1997-August 14, 2011
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« Reply #2204 on: February 03, 2012, 02:54:03 AM »

Moby Dick
Excellent choice!  I hope you enjoy it. I can't adequately put into words how much I did.
What do you think of that website I linked?

It seems quite interesting. The books I've read have been fairly well annotated (footnotes I believe), but not like that.  The format of the site would actually distract me from the story, but if you can avoid that, great.  I'll certainly use that website in the future, to pick up on terms and meanings that I've previously missed.
Have any recommendations on what edition I can buy in print?

About 30 pages left in The Mountain of Silence.  I've never read anything by this author before (Kyriacos C. Markides), though he's written several books.  Overall, it is pretty good, but Mr. (Dr.?  He's a professor in an American university, so I'd imagine he has a Ph.D., but I'm not 100% certain) Markides does in spots seem to make odd inferences and writes more than a couple bizarre things.

I'm about 10 pages deep but kind of tossed it aside for now. I don't like his style of writing.

When he gets to the part of the book where he spends an entire spring in Cyprus (I think it starts in the third chapter, or second half of second chapter - so you're almost there) he begins quote very heavily from Fr. Maximos, to the point that the book is probably 70% Fr. Maximos' words (if not more), and his writing style does start to improve.  Of course, I didn't mind it too much to begin with, but I think you might be glad if you give the book some time.
Yeah I will. His "biography" was boring in the beginning. I got too many other books I want to read at the moment, like Moby Dick and Lossky.
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“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
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