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Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 367931 times) Average Rating: 5
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Schultz
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« Reply #1890 on: September 06, 2011, 10:20:59 AM »

Spray-Paint the Walls: the Story of Black Flag by Stevie Chick.

Not bad.  The stories are great, I just wish the author wouldn't write like an '80s British journalist from Sounds.  The descriptions of songs/albums are ridiculously overblown and full of useless adjectives.  He's trying too hard.

Sounds like he is doing his work in the same spirit as Hank. Possible anecdote about the psychological effects from seeing Angry Hank in Soccer Shorts revealing entirely too much with too little to drink around four in the afternoon in a nearly empty room of people not sure why the soccer short guy is so angry.

It's more like the same spirit of Garry Bushell (whom I loathe).  Hank does try too hard, but you don't read his stuff and go, "Oh, will you stop trying to impress me with your thesaurus!"  With Henry, it's more like, "Oh, will you just please come out of the closet already!"

As to the rest, a friend of mine recently was at an Evens gig (Ian MacKaye's "kiddie" band, for lack of a better word) where Hank was in attendance.  In a room full of toddlers and parents, Henry was standing near the front, arms crossed, with his usual angry and annoyed look on his face.

It brought many lulz to those who knew who he was.
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« Reply #1891 on: September 06, 2011, 10:24:08 AM »

Spray-Paint the Walls: the Story of Black Flag by Stevie Chick.

Not bad.  The stories are great, I just wish the author wouldn't write like an '80s British journalist from Sounds.  The descriptions of songs/albums are ridiculously overblown and full of useless adjectives.  He's trying too hard.

Sounds like he is doing his work in the same spirit as Hank. Possible anecdote about the psychological effects from seeing Angry Hank in Soccer Shorts revealing entirely too much with too little to drink around four in the afternoon in a nearly empty room of people not sure why the soccer short guy is so angry.

It's more like the same spirit of Garry Bushell (whom I loathe).  Hank does try too hard, but you don't read his stuff and go, "Oh, will you stop trying to impress me with your thesaurus!"  With Henry, it's more like, "Oh, will you just please come out of the closet already!"

As to the rest, a friend of mine recently was at an Evens gig (Ian MacKaye's "kiddie" band, for lack of a better word) where Hank was in attendance.  In a room full of toddlers and parents, Henry was standing near the front, arms crossed, with his usual angry and annoyed look on his face.

It brought many lulz to those who knew who he was.

LOL!

Gotta tell my anecdote now, well later, but committed to it, since you made the subtext, the surtext.
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« Reply #1892 on: September 06, 2011, 11:37:59 AM »

I have a book recommendation for anyone who is interested in the history of language.  I'm reading Made in America: An Informal History of the English Language in the United States by Bill Bryson.  He's a really funny writer (Notes from a Small Island, The Mother Tongue, A Dictionary of Troublesome Words).  This is the most fascinating book I've read in a long time.  What we think we know about the origin of words, phrases in the US is so off.   
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« Reply #1893 on: September 06, 2011, 11:44:52 AM »

thanks, Tina!  I'm going to check that out.  My local library has a few copies and I've had one sent to my nearest branch.

Thanks again!
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« Reply #1894 on: September 06, 2011, 11:54:13 AM »

Spray-Paint the Walls: the Story of Black Flag by Stevie Chick.
Not bad.  The stories are great, I just wish the author wouldn't write like an '80s British journalist from Sounds.  The descriptions of songs/albums are ridiculously overblown and full of useless adjectives.  He's trying too hard.
Sounds like he is doing his work in the same spirit as Hank. Possible anecdote about the psychological effects from seeing Angry Hank in Soccer Shorts revealing entirely too much with too little to drink around four in the afternoon in a nearly empty room of people not sure why the soccer short guy is so angry.

It's more like the same spirit of Garry Bushell (whom I loathe).  Hank does try too hard, but you don't read his stuff and go, "Oh, will you stop trying to impress me with your thesaurus!"  With Henry, it's more like, "Oh, will you just please come out of the closet already!"

As to the rest, a friend of mine recently was at an Evens gig (Ian MacKaye's "kiddie" band, for lack of a better word) where Hank was in attendance.  In a room full of toddlers and parents, Henry was standing near the front, arms crossed, with his usual angry and annoyed look on his face.
It brought many lulz to those who knew who he was.

Schultz, you pretty much summed up my feelings about all of the above, but particularly about Garry Bushell's nonsense.
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« Reply #1895 on: September 06, 2011, 03:14:54 PM »

Re-reading Irene Zabytko's The Sky Unwashed. Hoping to have some time this week to pick up a new book, but I don't think that's going to happen!

WOW! I haven't read this one. And I should have - it's about Ukrainian immigrants, right?

On the same topic, have you read this book, http://www.reviewsofbooks.com/short_history_of_tractors_in_ukrainian/?
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« Reply #1896 on: September 06, 2011, 04:14:02 PM »

Yes. I love both of her books. (And The Sky Unwashed is very, very, very good.)

Marina Lewycka's writing in A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, depicting the vulgar Ukrainian gold-digger and her son are laugh out loud funny, though the tale is more darkly funny than anything else (we're dealing with a man heading into dementia, here). She delves into Ukrainian culture in her writing, but her novels are much more broad than that.
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« Reply #1897 on: September 06, 2011, 05:18:34 PM »

The Old Calendar Orthodox Church of Greece, by Archbp. Chrysostomos, Bp. Ambrose and Bp. Auxentios (w/prologue by Met. Cyprian)

That's a lot of bishops working on a book that's 80 pages long!  angel  Grin
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« Reply #1898 on: September 09, 2011, 04:27:10 PM »

For the regulars in the oc.net chat... remember about a week ago when we were talking about existentialism and whatnot? And I mentioned the book on existentialism by Walter Kaufmann, and our resident philosophizer was aghast and recommended going with something different? Yeah. Well guess what I picked up at Barnes and Noble today  Cheesy

Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre, by Walter Kaufmann

Sorry Jason!  Grin
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« Reply #1899 on: September 09, 2011, 06:53:06 PM »

For the regulars in the oc.net chat... remember about a week ago when we were talking about existentialism and whatnot? And I mentioned the book on existentialism by Walter Kaufmann, and our resident philosophizer was aghast and recommended going with something different? Yeah. Well guess what I picked up at Barnes and Noble today  Cheesy

Existentialism: From Dostoevsky to Sartre, by Walter Kaufmann

Sorry Jason!  Grin

Probably better to read that so you can understand what everyone thinks they know about.

Will serve you well on this board!

EDIT: Oh yeah, gotta lulz nearly every time I hear or see Dostoyevsky near the word Existentialism. Better though than when people call him the "greatest" writer ever.
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« Reply #1900 on: September 09, 2011, 08:46:35 PM »

Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
&
Clausewitz' On War.
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« Reply #1901 on: September 12, 2011, 06:01:40 AM »

There's a Devil in the Drum by John F. Lucy

The memoir of an Irish soldier who fought in World War I.
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« Reply #1902 on: September 12, 2011, 07:41:06 AM »

Almost done with: On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense - David Brooks

A legit laugh out loud funny look at American suburbia today.

http://www.amazon.com/Paradise-Drive-Always-Future-Tense/dp/0743227387
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« Reply #1903 on: September 12, 2011, 09:47:09 AM »

Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
&
Clausewitz' On War.

Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb. 
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« Reply #1904 on: September 12, 2011, 09:50:55 AM »

My friend is forcing To Kill a Mockingbird on me.

Maybe forty pages in and soooooo boring. Lee does a terrible job at capturing the mind and voice of a six year old.

Hope it improves.
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« Reply #1905 on: September 12, 2011, 09:59:00 AM »

How do some of you read so fast?  In the time since I posted that Clash of Civilizations was on order, Iconodule has recieved Devil's Horsemen and given Volnutt a review of it and IsmiLiora has read 27.8 books!

Meanwhile I started the third section section of CoC.  I have also bee reading Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger.  It covers diplomacy from the end of the 30 Years War up to the present (meaning sometime in the 90's when he wrote it).  I have gotten to just after the Hungarian Revolution and I started it in October.  2009!
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« Reply #1906 on: September 12, 2011, 10:11:43 AM »

I'm reading various essays by Nikolai Berdyaev. It's changing my life. No, seriously. Grin

Also, fast reading is nearly as important as fast eating. You do not eat to enjoy your food, rather you consume it to sustain life. Same with reading! If you're not reading at least a couple books a week, you're slowly dying. Admittedly, people who read a lot of books also die sometimes, but always from accidents or acts of God, never from "old age" or "natural causes". True fact.
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« Reply #1907 on: September 12, 2011, 10:53:12 AM »

How do some of you read so fast?  In the time since I posted that Clash of Civilizations was on order, Iconodule has recieved Devil's Horsemen and given Volnutt a review of it and IsmiLiora has read 27.8 books!

Meanwhile I started the third section section of CoC.  I have also bee reading Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger.  It covers diplomacy from the end of the 30 Years War up to the present (meaning sometime in the 90's when he wrote it).  I have gotten to just after the Hungarian Revolution and I started it in October.  2009!
LOL, I don't retain anything, so we're even.

I've never read COC (well, more than an excerpt), but I believed that there were some flaws in his premise when I read the article, so I never bothered. I read The Soldier and the State, which was quite interesting. I can't say more than that because military history is not my expertise at all. But I was fascinated.

I'm kind of wishing I had my copy of David Hackett Fischer's Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: A Cultural History). MY professor thought he was all sorts of wrong, and maybe he was, but I LOVED that book. Even after the class ended I read it 3 times a year or so. Hm, I think I'll ask my sister to ship it too me. It is ridic heavy, though.
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« Reply #1908 on: September 12, 2011, 11:38:03 AM »

Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
& Clausewitz' On War.
Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb.

That's the thing, I can't tell you.  Element of surprise, as they say, old boy.
Robb's Brave New War is a bit more "Jominian," in my opinion (heavier on tactics than grand strategy), but an interesting read nonetheless.
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« Reply #1909 on: September 12, 2011, 01:26:36 PM »

Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
& Clausewitz' On War.
Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb.

That's the thing, I can't tell you.  Element of surprise, as they say, old boy.
Robb's Brave New War is a bit more "Jominian," in my opinion (heavier on tactics than grand strategy), but an interesting read nonetheless.

His blog (Global Guerrillas) gets more into the strategy, though still not army level strategy, more non-state actor level strategy.
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« Reply #1910 on: September 19, 2011, 04:19:46 PM »

The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  Cheesy
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« Reply #1911 on: September 19, 2011, 07:13:16 PM »

A History of Modern Russia: From Tsarism to the Twenty-First Century], Third Edition / by Robert Service
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« Reply #1912 on: September 19, 2011, 07:32:19 PM »

The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  Cheesy

I would highly recommend Dreyfus' Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I to any and all who attempt to read this work alone and without much background.

Dreyfus' is a pugilist on the basic tennets in the first division upon which 98% of the rest of all Contemporary Philosophy hang (some hyperbole here, but not much). It can get somewhat tiresome, but it is for the most part the result of an Anglo-American trying to come to terms with the end of his own tradition and its futile attempts at progression. So some things are repeated over and over.

But perhaps for the best as these "simple" insight probably are the most confounding or "obvious" and need putting into context, especially those not familiar at all with Continental Thought. He also does a good job at giving alternate translations to some of the key terms in Being and Time, which I think can be at time better than both critical versions in English translation.

The appendices can go the way of the trash can. Primarily written by a student, they attempt to address the "sexier" parts of B&T that caught the eye of the "Existentialists" looking backward from Being and Nothingness. They do Heidegger and Kierkegaard harm and no good.

This is a true intro which can and perhaps ought to be read before approaching the Kraut.

If you do get B&T, please let me know, as there are substantial portions in the beginning which are going to be gibberish to someone who hasn't studied Phenomenology in depth and they are not needed to grasp the key questions Heidegger raises within the text. Often folks give up during them when reading it for "edification". They shouldn't. They should just skip them. Those sections on Phenomenology are startling if placed within the proper relationship to Husserl and the Western understanding of phenomena from time immemorial, but again not for non-expert reader. A necessary piece of writing from a student making his case for such a violent and shocking break from his mentor.

If you get especially jazzed by the work and wonder how in the world any  genius wrote such a work in a ski hut in less than a month, then the following is an incredible piece of scholarship for the lay person and scholar alike:

The Genesis of Heidegger's Being and Time by Theodore Kisiel.

Links to Dreyfus' and Kisiel's works:

http://www.amazon.com/Being-World-Commentary-Heideggers-Division/dp/0262540568/ref=pd_sim_b4

http://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Heideggers-Being-Time/dp/0520201590

   

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« Reply #1913 on: September 19, 2011, 07:46:59 PM »

Is it worth the effort to try to get into Hegel at all?
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« Reply #1914 on: September 19, 2011, 07:53:34 PM »

Starting back on my Orthodoxy reading. Reading some stuff about the Desert Fathers and looking through James R. Payton's Light from the Christian East: An Introduction to the Orthodox Tradition. Mr. Ismi has some big-time misunderstandings about the Church and I'm looking for a good book written about the faith vis-a-vis the Protestants so he gets what they are talking about. And of course I still have more to learn myself, even in the basics, so why not?
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« Reply #1915 on: September 19, 2011, 10:58:41 PM »

Starting back on my Orthodoxy reading. Reading some stuff about the Desert Fathers and looking through James R. Payton's Light from the Christian East: An Introduction to the Orthodox Tradition. Mr. Ismi has some big-time misunderstandings about the Church and I'm looking for a good book written about the faith vis-a-vis the Protestants so he gets what they are talking about. And of course I still have more to learn myself, even in the basics, so why not?
Has Mr. Ismi tried reading, Eastern Orthodoxy Through Western Eyes / by Donald Fairbairn?  I highly recommend that book for a Protestant to Orthodox journey.
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« Reply #1916 on: September 19, 2011, 11:26:34 PM »

No, but I will check that out soon! Thank you so much. I have had other recommendations from this post, too, and I will be looking at all of them. I deeply appreciate it.

Liora
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« Reply #1917 on: September 25, 2011, 12:50:13 PM »

Scored at the used-book store: The Medieval Cookbook by Maggie Black. Perfect companion book to Christmas Feasts from History that I already have.
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« Reply #1918 on: September 25, 2011, 01:02:26 PM »

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  Cheesy

I would highly recommend Dreyfus' Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I to any and all who attempt to read this work alone and without much background.

Dreyfus' is a pugilist on the basic tennets in the first division upon which 98% of the rest of all Contemporary Philosophy hang (some hyperbole here, but not much). It can get somewhat tiresome, but it is for the most part the result of an Anglo-American trying to come to terms with the end of his own tradition and its futile attempts at progression. So some things are repeated over and over.

But perhaps for the best as these "simple" insight probably are the most confounding or "obvious" and need putting into context, especially those not familiar at all with Continental Thought. He also does a good job at giving alternate translations to some of the key terms in Being and Time, which I think can be at time better than both critical versions in English translation.

The appendices can go the way of the trash can. Primarily written by a student, they attempt to address the "sexier" parts of B&T that caught the eye of the "Existentialists" looking backward from Being and Nothingness. They do Heidegger and Kierkegaard harm and no good.

This is a true intro which can and perhaps ought to be read before approaching the Kraut.

If you do get B&T, please let me know, as there are substantial portions in the beginning which are going to be gibberish to someone who hasn't studied Phenomenology in depth and they are not needed to grasp the key questions Heidegger raises within the text. Often folks give up during them when reading it for "edification". They shouldn't. They should just skip them. Those sections on Phenomenology are startling if placed within the proper relationship to Husserl and the Western understanding of phenomena from time immemorial, but again not for non-expert reader. A necessary piece of writing from a student making his case for such a violent and shocking break from his mentor.

If you get especially jazzed by the work and wonder how in the world any  genius wrote such a work in a ski hut in less than a month, then the following is an incredible piece of scholarship for the lay person and scholar alike:

The Genesis of Heidegger's Being and Time by Theodore Kisiel.

Links to Dreyfus' and Kisiel's works:

http://www.amazon.com/Being-World-Commentary-Heideggers-Division/dp/0262540568/ref=pd_sim_b4

http://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Heideggers-Being-Time/dp/0520201590

   


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« Reply #1919 on: September 25, 2011, 02:42:17 PM »

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

A lot of Gadamer? More than most people I would imagine. //:=)

Yes. Really Gadamer is just filling out Heidegger's understanding hermeneutics for the most part. I respect Gadamer a lot and could on about him forever.

Edith Stein, not so much, given her Thomistic turn. However she is one person in a line of many who, if people care about biography, show Heidegger out to be an @$$. Stein, Arendt, Celan . . . but not nearly the @$$ people want him to be.

Frankly I don't care much about biography as such and don't find it too informative in reading anything other than just more context and usually as meaningful as what I had for breakfast.

I wondered why you would have an interest in the above so looked into Edith Stein wikipage. I didn't realize how her life was lived out.

Lord have mercy on her.


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« Reply #1920 on: September 25, 2011, 02:58:22 PM »

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« Reply #1921 on: September 25, 2011, 03:20:09 PM »

I'm reading various essays by Nikolai Berdyaev. It's changing my life. No, seriously. Grin



have u read   something like

about the perfection of christianity and imperfection of christians...dont know if it is the same title in English.I read it in Serbian

http://www.pouke.org/forum/topic/7382-%d0%be-%d1%81%d0%b0%d0%b2%d1%80%d1%88%d0%b5%d0%bd%d1%81%d1%82%d0%b2%d1%83-%d1%85%d1%80%d0%b8%d1%88%d1%9b%d0%b0%d0%bd%d1%81%d1%82%d0%b2%d0%b0-%d0%b8-%d0%bd%d0%b5%d1%81%d0%b0%d0%b2%d1%80%d1%88%d0%b5%d0%bd%d1%81%d1%82%d0%b2%d1%83-%d1%85%d1%80%d0%b8/page__view__findpost__p__216964

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« Reply #1922 on: September 25, 2011, 03:38:34 PM »

have u read   something like

about the perfection of christianity and imperfection of christians...dont know if it is the same title in English.I read it in Serbian

If it's the same one as this one, then yeah Smiley Here and here are good resources on him (in English anyway)... at least as far as his articles and such. Most of his books seem to have been translated and published in English as well (as opposed to Nikolai Lossky, someone else on my list, who seems to have only had a few works translated). I don't think my priest was thrilled about reading Berdyaev though, I asked if he'd read anything by him and he responded with something diplomatic like "No, I haven't... wasn't he... sort of... off with some of his ideas?"  Cheesy

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

Haven't read them, no... though I bookmarked wiki and could add them depending on how the Heidegger reading goes. I've got a few of Camus books ahead of anything at this point, though.
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« Reply #1923 on: September 25, 2011, 04:29:10 PM »

Still working on the last Orthodox book I posted and Naghib Mahfouz's Midaq Alley.

I'm finding hard to get past the first few pages, although a reviewer at Amazon said the same thing and promised it would pick up, so I'm sticking to it (plus, Mahfouz is one of the most well-known Egyptian authors, so I'm not putting it down right away).

I'm having a problem watching TV or reading lately...can't do it for more than 15 minutes at a time without worrying about work or something else in the household. That's certainly getting annoying.
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« Reply #1924 on: September 25, 2011, 04:41:45 PM »

Still working on the last Orthodox book I posted and Naghib Mahfouz's Midaq Alley.

I'm finding hard to get past the first few pages, although a reviewer at Amazon said the same thing and promised it would pick up, so I'm sticking to it (plus, Mahfouz is one of the most well-known Egyptian authors, so I'm not putting it down right away).

I'm having a problem watching TV or reading lately...can't do it for more than 15 minutes at a time without worrying about work or something else in the household. That's certainly getting annoying.

Your avatars have taken a huge drop in quality since you let a few comments put you off.

I ain't talking about "attractive women" per se, but you always batted 1.000 for elegance in a grace in women's fashion displayed in your avatars.

Oh well, I always like them.

I currently I enjoy TheodoraElizabeth3's:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;attach=7950;type=avatar

And bumped up against gentle Rosehip's the other day. Always loved her avatar. Always sad to see it now:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/avatars/avatar_2352.png

Memory Eternal!

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« Reply #1925 on: September 25, 2011, 04:46:14 PM »

My last avatar is me, dodo, so good time to make an insult Wink. I was fooling around with some picture effects for something and I kind of liked the weird quality of what came out of it (can't remember the exact order of the 900 effects I did on the photo, though, so that's a loss).

And I honestly wasn't bothered by the comments, as I didn't change the image right away. I change my avatar every week or so, since I get bored very quickly.

I have an idea for the next one...we'll see if you like that one, but it's from an older propaganda poster I found two days ago, and doesn't have much to do with fashion. I'll send you a copy of Vogue or Harper's Bazaar with my comments written on post-it notes if you are dying for my fashion critique. Just PM me your address.

PS You have yet to explain your dislike for Ms. Khorkina, and we have to address that before we go anywhere else. Thanks.

KEEP ON TOPIC:
I purchased a book about Mexican Immigrant culture in California in the early 20th century for my Kindle this week...turns out that it's a book about the SCHOLARSHIP on Mexican Immigrant culture in California. I feel like I'm in Anthro 101 again. Epic fail on my part.
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« Reply #1926 on: September 25, 2011, 04:52:22 PM »

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« Reply #1927 on: September 25, 2011, 04:52:57 PM »

My last avatar is me, dodo, so good time to make an insult Wink. I was fooling around with some picture effects for something and I kind of liked the weird quality of what came out of it (can't remember the exact order of the 900 effects I did on the photo, though, so that's a loss).

And I honestly wasn't bothered by the comments, as I didn't change the image right away. I change my avatar every week or so, since I get bored very quickly.

I have an idea for the next one...we'll see if you like that one, but it's from an older propaganda poster I found two days ago, and doesn't have much to do with fashion. I'll send you a copy of Vogue or Harper's Bazaar with my comments written on post-it notes if you are dying for my fashion critique. Just PM me your address.

I knew it was you. //:=) The black and white not loving it so much.

Marked up magazines!

That would be AWESOME. I would TOTALLY dig that.

Careful. Mouth. Write. Checks. Can't. Cash.

I've like been totally miserable lately, I forgot to send you the non-cryptic cryptic email, I'll drop my address in the email. It'll give me a reason to check the mail for something other than Blood Bath coupons I can sell.

I could have avoided all this and put it into the email, but then what fun would that be. I have a reputation to uphold.



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« Reply #1928 on: September 25, 2011, 04:58:21 PM »

Marked up magazines!

That would be AWESOME. I would TOTALLY dig that.

Careful. Mouth. Write. Checks. Can't. Cash.

Oh, I could totally do that. Don't know when, but I'm considering adding magazine commentary to my blog project...whenever I find time to get it started. But the wheels are turning.

Non-crypticism (?) will be good.

Back to your scheduled programming.
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« Reply #1929 on: September 25, 2011, 05:21:21 PM »

Aelred Rievaulx's "Spiritual Friendship"
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« Reply #1930 on: September 25, 2011, 05:47:02 PM »

have u read   something like

about the perfection of christianity and imperfection of christians...dont know if it is the same title in English.I read it in Serbian

If it's the same one as this one, then yeah Smiley

yes,it is the same  Grin thx
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« Reply #1931 on: September 25, 2011, 06:15:32 PM »

Aelred Rievaulx's "Spiritual Friendship"

Nice.
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« Reply #1932 on: September 25, 2011, 06:54:16 PM »

Aelred Rievaulx's "Spiritual Friendship"


That's a very good bit of spiritual writing.  St. Teresa of Avila also has many good things to say about the kinds of friends one keeps, as well as the kinds of friends who are keepers!!

Anything in it that you'd like to share in particular?
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« Reply #1933 on: September 25, 2011, 07:04:30 PM »

have u read   something like

about the perfection of christianity and imperfection of christians...dont know if it is the same title in English.I read it in Serbian

If it's the same one as this one, then yeah Smiley

yes,it is the same  Grin thx


That is a beautiful essay. I will have to read more of him.
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« Reply #1934 on: September 25, 2011, 07:12:04 PM »

Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

A lot of Gadamer? More than most people I would imagine. //:=)

Yes. Really Gadamer is just filling out Heidegger's understanding hermeneutics for the most part. I respect Gadamer a lot and could on about him forever.

Edith Stein, not so much, given her Thomistic turn. However she is one person in a line of many who, if people care about biography, show Heidegger out to be an @$$. Stein, Arendt, Celan . . . but not nearly the @$$ people want him to be.

Frankly I don't care much about biography as such and don't find it too informative in reading anything other than just more context and usually as meaningful as what I had for breakfast.

I wondered why you would have an interest in the above so looked into Edith Stein wikipage. I didn't realize how her life was lived out.

Lord have mercy on her.




I love Gadamer...I have his biography, but have not read it yet.  I also have the letters of Hannah Arendt and Karl Jaspers, also have not read them though plan to do so...sometime. 

Yes...Edith Stein's Thomistic turn was precisely what allowed her to "correct" Heidegger.

There are several 20th century minds that I cling to for some sort of sanity.

Edith is one of them.  Henri de Lubac another.  Bernard Lonnergan is another.  Thomas Langan another.  Jacques Maritan another.  Etienne Gilson another.  Jaques Barzun another.  Hannah Arendt another.  Joseph Ratzinger another.  Karol Wojtyla another.  Giles Emery another.  Slavoj Zizek and Jurgen Habermas to round things out.  Smiley....and Janet Flanner and Iris Murdock to give me a few laughs as a woman, and wonder at the odd things of the world.
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