Author Topic: What is everyone reading?  (Read 436862 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1035 on: September 24, 2009, 01:47:40 AM »
Johannes Scotus Eriugena's De divisione naturae
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Offline Nyssa The Hobbit

  • Used to be OrthodoxFairyQueen
  • Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 396
    • Who is this Nyssa person, anyway?
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1036 on: October 05, 2009, 01:21:50 AM »
King Rat by James Clavell
Author of "Tojet" (fantasy) and "The Lighthouse" (Gothic), info available at my website URL.

Offline Heorhij

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,576
    • Mississippi University for Women
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1037 on: October 05, 2009, 08:36:40 AM »
"The City and The Pillar," by Gore Vidal. Very powerful story, somewhat autobiographical, about growing up gay in the 1930-s - 1940-s.
Love never fails.

Offline TinaG

  • I am not a pessimist - I'm just grimly realistic!
  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 870
  • If only my family were this normal !
    • Cometh at Midnight Blog
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1038 on: October 05, 2009, 08:57:45 AM »
The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet by Reif Larsen.  Excellent & quirky - every page is illustrated by hand drawings, odd diagrams and quirky maps.
On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.

Offline Elisha

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,565
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1039 on: October 05, 2009, 09:37:38 AM »
"Orthodoxy" by Chesterton

Offline Papist

  • Patriarch of Pontification
  • Toumarches
  • ************
  • Posts: 12,782
  • Praying for the Christians in Iraq
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1040 on: October 05, 2009, 01:37:21 PM »
"Orthodoxy" by Chesterton
One of my all time favorites.
You are right. I apologize for having sacked Constantinople. I really need to stop doing that.

Offline John Larocque

  • Catholic
  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 530
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1041 on: October 05, 2009, 02:50:46 PM »
Nearly done Lossky's "Mystical theology of the Eastern Church". It appears I ordered one of the last copies, as SVS press no longer lists the title in its online catalog. I had to read a couple of chapters twice but am near the end. The subject matter is difficult but not impossible, and my Zen and Buddhist readings from a few years ago already gave me a healthy introduction into the "apophatic" headspace.

Also ordered and just started Olivier Clement's "Roots of Christian Mysticism," which includes some several Western fathers as well, and a biography of each father at the back.

« Last Edit: October 05, 2009, 02:56:47 PM by John Larocque »

Offline livefreeordie

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 751
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1042 on: October 05, 2009, 02:59:21 PM »
Robert Penn Warren's - "Wilderness:A Tale of the Civil War".  We graduated from the same school and I've always wanted to read more of him. It's pretty good so far.

Online Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,023
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1043 on: October 05, 2009, 03:13:29 PM »


The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1044 on: October 05, 2009, 08:42:14 PM »


The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.

Cool. I love that cover!

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Offline GabrieltheCelt

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,014
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox OCA
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1045 on: October 05, 2009, 10:17:04 PM »

The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.

Great book!  I've enjoyed it for years.
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Online Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,023
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1046 on: October 05, 2009, 10:30:23 PM »
Cool. I love that cover!

You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.

Offline scamandrius

  • Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,535
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek in exile
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1047 on: October 05, 2009, 11:03:05 PM »
Sailing from Byzantium by Colin Wells.

The Roman Empire by Colin Wells.

Living Tradition by +Fr. John Meyendorff.

The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius.
I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1048 on: October 05, 2009, 11:03:35 PM »
Cool. I love that cover!

You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.

I'll get try to get it soon.

I recently got my four volumes of the Philokalia, and have begun reading through it. Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Forgive my ignorance.

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Online Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,023
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1049 on: October 05, 2009, 11:09:06 PM »
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.

Offline GabrieltheCelt

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,014
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox OCA
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1050 on: October 05, 2009, 11:12:51 PM »
Financial Reports for Dummies. by Lita Epstein

 Good grief!  I'd rather watch paint dry y'all...  :-\
« Last Edit: October 05, 2009, 11:14:08 PM by GabrieltheCelt »
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1051 on: October 05, 2009, 11:14:29 PM »
Euclid's Elements.

Surprisingly enough, this is this first time I am going through the actual thing.
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1052 on: October 06, 2009, 12:51:59 AM »
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.

I may get it anyway. If nothng else, I love that cover! Who is the Saint pictured on the front? Is that St. Antony?

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Online Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,023
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1053 on: October 06, 2009, 01:47:46 AM »
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
« Last Edit: October 06, 2009, 01:49:02 AM by Alveus Lacuna »

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1054 on: October 06, 2009, 01:59:44 AM »
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Wow. I thought it might be a picture of St. Antony reading the Scriptures in the presence of some demonic creature. I know from Athanasius' Life of Antony that he encountered all manner of demonic visions- hideous creatures as well as angelic-looking beings. But St. Antony never listened to any of them, because he knew they were all from the devil. So I doubt if he would have listened to a "hippocentaur." But I could be wrong. What do you tihink?

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Online Alveus Lacuna

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,023
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1055 on: October 06, 2009, 02:35:29 AM »
All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1056 on: October 06, 2009, 02:45:58 AM »
All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.

Very interesting indeed. I'd love to know more about this story. It must have been a vision, since "hippocentaurs" could not have been actual physical creatures of this earthly realm.

Selam
« Last Edit: October 06, 2009, 02:46:25 AM by Gebre Menfes Kidus »
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Offline GabrieltheCelt

  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 7,014
  • Faith: Eastern Orthodox OCA
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1057 on: October 06, 2009, 03:17:19 AM »
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1058 on: October 06, 2009, 03:33:43 AM »
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?

Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html

OK, here are my uneducated thoughts on this subject. I believe that theoretically unicorns, dragons, and the leviathon could have actually existed. But these half man half horse "centaur" creatures seem to violate the biblical account of Creation. Humans were created specifically and uniquely in the image of God, and thus there can be no such thing as a partial human. But unicorns, dragons, and leviathon do not do violence to the Creation account, nor do they undermine the sanctity of human life.

What do you think?

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Offline Irish Hermit

  • Kibernetski Kaludjer
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 10,991
  • Holy Father Patrick, pray for us
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1059 on: October 06, 2009, 08:07:27 AM »
Johannes Scotus Eriugena's De divisione naturae

An Orthodox Evaluation of Certain Teachings in the Writings
of John Scotus Eriugena
in Light of the Theology of St Gregory Palamas

by Deacon Geoffrey Ready


http://web.archive.org/web/20031210140924/http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/eriugena.htm

He makes a pathetic and not undignified figure, this eager, slightly-built Irishman,
with his subtle mind, his studious habits, his deeply reverent spirit,
his almost fanatical devotion to the wise men of former days,
Pagan or Christian, who had lived in the light of a wider civilisation:
called upon to fight the battles of the West with arms forged in the East,
and reprimanded even in the hour of conquest for having transgressed the rules of the field.

Alice Gardner, Studies in John the Scot.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He deviated from the path of the Latins
while he kept his eyes intently fixed on the Greeks;
wherefore he was reputed an heretic.

William of Malmesbury, de Pontificibus.

John Scotus Eriugena stands as a remarkable figure in the spiritual history of the Christian West. His native Ireland was insula sanctorum — the "Isle of the Saints," where Orthodox Christianity, planted by Saint Pádraig in the fifth century, had taken such root that it had created an entire monastic culture and produced countless thousands of glorified saints. By the ninth century, however, the Apostolic and Patristic Tradition of glorification which had transformed Ireland was coming under an attack which would ultimately prove more devastating than those of the Vikings who were by now violently raiding monastic settlements along the Irish coasts.

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1060 on: October 06, 2009, 10:28:17 PM »
Edgar Allan Poe's Eureka: A Prose Poem
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Offline Justin Kissel

  • •|•|•
  • Protospatharios
  • ****************
  • Posts: 31,761
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1061 on: October 09, 2009, 10:05:11 PM »
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).
« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 10:05:44 PM by Asteriktos »
"My doubt in Christ is not like that of a child; it was forged in a furnace of faith." - Dostoevsky

Offline Justinian

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 176
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1062 on: October 09, 2009, 11:15:48 PM »
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).

You should try Athiest Delusions: The Christian Revolution and its Fashionable Enemies, published by Yale University Press by (a Orthodox theologian no less!) David Bentley Hart. It takes on the Hitchens, Dawkins, Harris, etc. and also gives a very enlightening and fresh look at Christian History.
"All this indignation have I hurled, At the pretending part of the proud world. Who, swollen with selfish vanity devise: false freedoms, holy cheats, and formal lies, Over their fellow slaves to tyrannize." - John Wilmot

Offline Justin Kissel

  • •|•|•
  • Protospatharios
  • ****************
  • Posts: 31,761
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1063 on: October 09, 2009, 11:43:38 PM »
Thanks for the recommendation, I moved that book towards the top of my list of books to buy. I was amazed at how many books had been published lately refuting Dawkins, Hitchens, Dennett, and Harris. I have over 25 on my list of potential books to get on this topic... I have no intention of reading all of them, but I still don't know which ones will make the cut...

Quote
[BOUGHT]The Dawkins Delusion?: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine - McGrath and Mcgrath
[BOUGHT]God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens - Haught
Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies - David Bentley Hart
The New Atheist Crusaders and Their Unholy Grail: The Misguided Quest to Destroy Your Faith - Garrison
The Truth Behind the New Atheism: Responding to the Emerging Challenges to God and Christianity - David Marshall
Answering the New Atheism: Dismantling Dawkins' Case Against God - Hahn and Wiker
The New Atheists: The Twilight of Reason and the War on Religion - Beattie
Atheism Remix: A Christian Confronts the New Atheists - Albert Mohler Jr.
The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism - Edward Feser
When Atheism Becomes Religion: America's New Fundamentalists - Chris Hedges
Dawkins' Dilemmas - Michael Austin
The Deluded Athist: A Response to Richard Dawkins -  Douglas Wilson
Why There Almost Certainly Is a God - Keith Ward
Is God a Delusion? A Reply to Religion's Cultured Despisers - Eric Reitan
The Devil's Delusion - David Berlinski
God, Doubt, and Dawkins: Reform Rabbis Respond to the God Delusion - Jonathan Romain
Deluded by Dawkins? - Andrew Wilson
The Irrational Atheist: Dessecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, harris, and Hitches - Vox Day
Darwin's Angel - John Cornwell
The End of Reason: A Response to the New Atheists - Zacharias and Strobel
The Delusion of Disbelief: Why the New Atheism is a Threat to Your Life, Liberty, and Pursuit of Happiness - Aikman
God is No Delusion: A Refutation of Richard Dawkins - Crean
The Atheist Delusion - Fernandes
The Devil's Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions - Berlinski
Letter to a Christian Nation: Counter Point - Metcalf
Letter from a Christian Citizen - A Response to "Letter to a Christian Nation" - Wilson
Letter to an Atheist - Leahy
« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 11:47:11 PM by Asteriktos »
"My doubt in Christ is not like that of a child; it was forged in a furnace of faith." - Dostoevsky

Offline Riddikulus

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,788
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1064 on: October 09, 2009, 11:57:34 PM »
The Dawkins Delusion: Atheist Fundamentalism and the Denial of the Divine by McGrath and McGrath
God and the New Atheism: A Critical Response to Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens by John F. Haught
God: The Failed Hypothesis, How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger

The first two were rather interesting reads, though the third one has been sort of dry so far (and has a foreward by Hitchens, who I'm not a big fan of).

I reserved the Dawkins Delusion at the library and await its arrival. Since our new house project, I've had to curtail the book buying.  :'(
I believe in One God, maker of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.

Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.
Theodosius Dobzhansky, Russian Orthodox Christian (1900-1975)

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1065 on: October 10, 2009, 12:05:53 AM »
I tend to stay away from books on religion that include "Delusion" in the title.  Whether they are from a Christian or Atheist view, I find they tend to have weak arguments, are painfully drawn out, and end up making the "other side" look better.  :P
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Offline Riddikulus

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,788
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1066 on: October 10, 2009, 12:16:23 AM »
I tend to stay away from books on religion that include "Delusion" in the title.  Whether they are from a Christian or Atheist view, I find they tend to have weak arguments, are painfully drawn out, and end up making the "other side" look better.  :P


:laugh:
I believe in One God, maker of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.

Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.
Theodosius Dobzhansky, Russian Orthodox Christian (1900-1975)

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1067 on: October 10, 2009, 12:30:29 AM »
Honestly, I have never been a fan of Dawkins, but after reading McGrath's book...  he became that much more bearable.

Currently reading:  Scott Adams' God's Debris: A Thought Experiment
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Offline Douglas

  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 608
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1068 on: October 10, 2009, 12:43:49 AM »
Currently reading: Planet Google: One Company's Audacious Plan To Organize Everything We Know by Randall Stross. It's a frightening and eye-opening look at a company with massive ambitions.
Douglas no longer posts on the forum.

Offline Ebor

  • Vanyar
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,482
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1069 on: October 16, 2009, 06:31:30 PM »
Just finished the Popul Vuh for a class.  Fascinating.  The week before was The Death of the King's Horseman a play by Wole Soyinka.
"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.

Online Gebre Menfes Kidus

  • "SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,787
  • "Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"
    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=1456515775
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1070 on: October 16, 2009, 06:49:00 PM »
Thirsting for God in a Land of Shallow Wells  by Matthew Gallatin

It's very good so far.

Selam
"There are two great tragedies: one is to live a life ruled by the passions, and the other is to live a passionless life."
Selam, +GMK+

Offline Entscheidungsproblem

  • Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,495
    • Amsterdam Declaration 2002
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1071 on: October 16, 2009, 08:50:36 PM »
Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart's What Does a Martian Look Like? The Science of Extraterrestrial Life
As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS

Offline Justin Kissel

  • •|•|•
  • Protospatharios
  • ****************
  • Posts: 31,761
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1072 on: October 16, 2009, 08:54:07 PM »
Christianity and Classical Culture: The Metamorphosis of Natural Theology in the Christian Encounter with Hellenism, by Jaroslav Pelikan
The Art of Prayer: An Orthodox Anthology, compiled by Igumen Chariton of Valamo
Godless: How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists, by Dan Barker
"My doubt in Christ is not like that of a child; it was forged in a furnace of faith." - Dostoevsky

Offline Jetavan

  • Argumentum ad australopithecum
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,580
  • Barlaam and Josaphat
    • The Mystical Theology
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1073 on: October 17, 2009, 10:43:15 AM »
Thank God for Evolution, by Michael Dowd
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
सर्वभूतहित
Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.

Offline Riddikulus

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,788
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1074 on: October 17, 2009, 06:45:30 PM »
Thank God for Evolution, by Michael Dowd

Oh, that does look interesting! How's it going?
I believe in One God, maker of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.

Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.
Theodosius Dobzhansky, Russian Orthodox Christian (1900-1975)

Offline Sakeneko

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 152
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1075 on: October 17, 2009, 08:31:06 PM »
"The Black Hole War", by Leonard Susskind

An engagingly written book about a major development in the physics of black holes in the past twenty years.  If you're a scientist, this will be light but enjoyable reading.  If you're not, you may struggle to follow some of the equations, but the math is reasonably light and well explained for a general audience. Susskind, unlike many top scientists, is able to communicate with those who aren't as bright as he is to the benefit of both. ;-)

"Sphinx's Princess", by Esther Friesner

A young adult level fictionalized "autobiography" of the adolescent Nefertiti.  So far this has been rather well done.  Friesner did her homework, so there's a realistic base to this essentially romantic story, and it is leavened by flashes of humor.  (As anybody familiar with Friesner's earlier work would have expected -- she's one of the best living writers of science fiction and fantasy humor.)  I'm reading this before giving a couple of copies to nieces and goddaughters for Christmas. :-)

By the way, *any* collection of the sayings of the Desert Fathers translated by Sr. Benedicta Ward is worth having and reading over and over again.  I reread mine during Lent every year.

Offline Jetavan

  • Argumentum ad australopithecum
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,580
  • Barlaam and Josaphat
    • The Mystical Theology
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1076 on: October 18, 2009, 09:22:13 AM »
Thank God for Evolution, by Michael Dowd

Oh, that does look interesting! How's it going?
It's a fascinating attempt to see evolution as a 'sacred' process. He draws heavily on the work of Thomas Berry, Catholic philosopher, who wrote:

Quote
The basic mood of the future might well be one of confidence in the continuing revelation that takes place in and through the Earth. If the dynamics of the Universe from the beginning shaped the course of the heavens, lighted the sun, and formed the Earth, if this same dynamism brought forth the continents and the seas and atmosphere, if it awakened life in the primordial cell and then brought into being the unnumbered variety of living beings, and finally brought us into being and guided us safely through the turbulent centuries, there is reason to believe that this same guiding process is precisely what has awakened in us our present understanding of ourselves and our relation to this stupendous process. Sensitized to such guidance from the very structure and functioning of the Universe, we can have confidence in the future that awaits the human venture.
If you will, you can become all flame.
Extra caritatem nulla salus.
In order to become whole, take the "I" out of "holiness".
सर्वभूतहित
Ἄνω σχῶμεν τὰς καρδίας
"Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is." -- Mohandas Gandhi
Y dduw bo'r diolch.

Offline Riddikulus

  • Protokentarchos
  • *********
  • Posts: 4,788
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1077 on: October 18, 2009, 06:43:06 PM »
^Oh yes, that does look interesting . Added the book to my wishlist.  ;D
I believe in One God, maker of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.

Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.
Theodosius Dobzhansky, Russian Orthodox Christian (1900-1975)

Offline John Larocque

  • Catholic
  • High Elder
  • ******
  • Posts: 530
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1078 on: October 23, 2009, 01:12:41 AM »
Just got:
"Eucharist, Bishop, Church" by John D. Zizioulas (+John of Pergamon)


Offline scamandrius

  • Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
  • Taxiarches
  • **********
  • Posts: 6,535
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek in exile
Re: What is everyone reading?
« Reply #1079 on: October 23, 2009, 07:24:59 AM »
I never thought I would say this but I am reading way too much. I don't think my brain can take much more!  Titles for this week. I'm back on a Runciman kick.

The Byzantine Theocracy
by Sir Steven Runciman
The Sicilian Vespers by Sir Steven Runciman
The Great Church in Captivity by Sir Steven Runciman
The Eastern Schism by Sir Steven Runciman
The Economics of the Tax Revolt, ed. Arthur Laffer and Jan Seymour
I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene