Author Topic: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?  (Read 850 times)

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Offline rakovsky

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There is a legend that Jesus in his youth visited England with Joseph of Arimathea as a merchant and as Christ's uncle.

According to the legend, Joseph A. lived near what is called the "Chalice Well".


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Joseph of Arimathea weary and exhausted from the long trip, stepped out of the hide covered skiff and planted his wooden staff into the ground... This site is called Weary-all Hill.   At that site the traditions state that the staff of Joseph grew into a thorn bush with beautiful white flowers that bloom [around Christmas]...
 
This thorn bush also by tradition lived for almost fifteen hundred years until one of Cromwell’s Christians sought to eradicate its memory by chopping it down. The tree grew again from its roots and transplanted in several sites in England, one of which is by the present day Glastonbury Abbey Chapel.
http://www.biblesearchers.com/hebrewchurch/primitive/primitive6.shtml

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And then there was the Glastonbury Thorn which is said to have grown where Joseph of Arimathea planted his staff on Wearyall Hill. The remarkable thing is that the Glastonbury Thorn, which flowers twice a year, is not a native species, but originates in the Middle East, possibly in Palestine. It was cut down by Cromwell’s men but the townspeople took slips of it and scattered them in gardens around the town. The 20th-century one grown again on Wearyall Hill was vandalised a few years ago and is now a bare stump, hung about with votive ribbons. Even the new sapling meant to replace it has disappeared. Yet flourishing Thorn trees can be seen elsewhere, most notably in the churchyard of St John the Baptist in the High Street.
http://donnafletchercrow.com/p/187/GLASTONBURY-Researching-The-Wounded-Thorn


Joseph of Arimathea at Glastonbury with the Flowering Almond Staff with the Glastonbury Tor

According to legend, after the Great Commission Joseph of Arimathea was sent to Britain to spread the faith.

Map showing a theorized journey of Joseph of Arimathea


Glastonbury Chalice Well

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Christian mythology suggests that Chalice Well marks the site where Joseph of Arimathea placed the chalice that had caught the drops of Christ's blood at the Crucifixion, linking the Well to the wealth of speculation surrounding the existence of the Holy Grail. The red of the water is also said by some Christians to represent the rusty iron nails used at the Crucifixion.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalice_Well

William of Malmesbury wrote in the 12th c.:
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“In the year of our Lord, 63, twelve holy missionaries, with Joseph of Arimathea (who had buried the Lord) at their head, came over to Britain, preaching the Incarnation of Jesus Christ.

The king of the country and his subjects refused to become proselytes to their teachings, but in consideration that they had come a long journey, and being somewhat pleased with their soberness of life and unexceptional behavior, the king, at their petition, gave them for their habitation a certain island bordering on his region, covered with trees and bramble bushes and surrounded by marshes, called Ynis-wytren (and later Glastonbury). 
http://www.biblesearchers.com/hebrewchurch/primitive/primitive6.shtml




Chapel of Mary at Glastonbury Abbey

Wikipedia considers at least some of these stories disproven:
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myths dispelled include the visit by Jesus, the building of the oldest church in England, and the flowering of the walking stick. ... The legend that Joseph of Arimathea retrieved certain holy relics was introduced by the French poet Robert de Boron in his 13th-century version of the grail story, thought to have been a trilogy though only fragments of the later books survive today. The work became the inspiration for the later Vulgate Cycle of Arthurian tales.[46] De Boron's account relates how Joseph captured Jesus' blood in a cup (the "Holy Grail") which was subsequently brought to Britain.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glastonbury#Mythology_and_legends

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The story is still told “at Marazion in Cornwall of St. Joseph coming there to trade with tin miners” (Glastonbury - Her Saints, page 66 by the Rev. Lionel Smithett Lewis, MA). In the Guide to Penzance (Ward, Locke and Co.) it is stated; “There is a tradition that Joseph of Arimathaea was connected with Marazion when he and other Jews traded with the ancient tin miners in Cornwall”. Marazion means ‘bitter Zion’. It’s other name is still Market Jew. The origin is said to be derived from the fact that it was a colony of Jews, who traded in tin. “‘Jew’s houses’, ‘Jew’s tin’, ‘Jew’s leavings’, ‘Jew’s pieces’ are still common terms in the Cornish tin mines. The oldest pits containing smelted tin are called “Jew’s houses”. (Glastonbury Her Saints, page 66). “Amongst the old tin workers, who have always observed a certain mystery in their rites, there was a moment when they ceased their work and started signing a quaint song beginning ‘Joseph was a tin Merchant;.”
http://stpeterandstpaul.org/index.php/multimedia/articles/39-the-apostles-in-britain



According to other traditions, Aristobulus was a major apostle to Britain, and the apostle Simon the Zealot was martyred there.
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Gildas the Wise, the earliest Christian historian (AD 425-512) distinctly says that the Light of Christ shone here in the last year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, that is AD 37. This falls in with the claim recorded above, which gave precedence to British Bishops at the Church Councils on the ground that Britain was converted "immediately after the Passion of Jesus Christ". It fits in also with the statements of Fuller and Polydore Virgil already recorded that the Church of Glastonbury was the Senior Church of the world; with Sir Henry Spelman's words that Britain received the Faith soon after the Crucifixion; with Alford's statement that Aristobulus was in Britain before St. Paul went to Rome; with the observance by the Greek Church of the martyrdom in Britain of Our Lord's disciple, St. Simon Zelotes, on May 10, AD 44 (a date supported by Cardinal Baronius; and with Hippolytus' (born about AD 160) inclusion of that Apostle in his lists as "Bishop of the Britons".
http://asis.com/users/stag/glastonb.html

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While some orthodox traditions say [Aristobulus] "died in peace",[7] others say he was martyred in Wales.[5] Catholic tradition says he was martyred.[6] The Benedictine monk Serenus de Cressy (1605–1674) maintained that Aristobulus was ordained by St. Paul and died at Glastonbury Abbey in 99 AD; but Michael Alford (author of Fides Regia Britannica Sive Annales Ecclesiae Britannicae) says that Aristobulus was the husband of "Mary" Salome, which makes this date appear too late.[3] Alford gives his death as "the second year of Nero" – 56 AD.[8] Alford also asserts that "It is perfectly certain that, before St Paul had come to Rome, Aristobulus was away in Britain".[9][10] This is in accord with the date given by Gildas the Wise (c. 500–570 AD) that the "Light of Christ" shone in Britain in the last year of Emperor Tiberias.[11] However, George Smith points out that this a misinterpretation of Gildas, and says that the Gospel was not preached in Britain before the reign of Claudius,[12] whose full name was Tiberius Claudius Caesar.

From these traditions it seems that Aristobulus was the founder of British Christianity (probably at Glastonbury). While Joseph of Arimathea or members of his group may have been involved, the early writings frequently centre on Aristobulus.[3] However, there is no mention of Joseph prior to the Conquest.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristobulus_of_Britannia

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Taylor makes the penetrating comment that Phoenician trading-posts and colonies were always the first to receive Christian missionaries; not only Antioch and Tyre, but Marseilles, Alexandria, Spain and Cornwall…. For there was a founder of Christianity in Britain in the 1st century, and whether it was Joseph or another, he brought an eastern, not Roman brand of the faith. Celtic missionaries, amazingly enough, were already converting Europe from Britain at that time…. In 190 Tertullian of Carthage wrote ‘The extremities of Spain, the various parts of Gaul, the regions of Britain never penetrated by Roman arms, have received the religion of Christ.’ Sabellius the heretic said in 230 AD ‘Christianity was privately expressed elsewhere, but the first nation that proclaimed it as their religion was Britain’.
...
Regarding the Jesus and Joseph of Arimathea in Cornwall legends, Walter de M. Seaman writes: “There are those among the older folk of the district of St. Just-in- Roseland, near Place Manor, who used to repeat the age-old belief ‘Christ came in a ship and anchored in St. Just Creek,’ and across the waters of the Fal at Falmouth, this odd little story was brought to light: Joseph of Arimathea and the young lad Jesus from Nazareth, landed at the Strand (now the town quay), crossed the stream and went up Smithick Hill…. In the far West of Cornwall, there are or were two rich lodes (or veins) of tin. One was named Corpus Christi (the body of Christ) and the other Wheal Jesus. Wheal is the old Cornish word for mine
http://sacredconnections.co.uk/index.php/christ-mission-in-britain/

The article above narrates legends connecting two Roseland churches with Jesus.

St. Just in Roseland Church

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“It would appear to be just a legend except for two inscriptions in the almost unknown Church of St. Anthony-in-Roseland in Cornwall. On the South Door of the Church is a story in ancient Pictographs, carved in stone over 1000 years ago. It is said to read that Our Lord came with his uncle to Cornwall for tin.


South door of St. Anthony in Roseland Church

http://sacredconnections.co.uk/index.php/christ-mission-in-britain/


Another narrative is that Claudia, mentioned in Paul's letter to Timothy, was Welsh and brought back Christianity from Rome to Wales:
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On a hill called Caer Caradoc, at Church Stretton in Shropshire, the Welsh king Caractacus, leader of the combined British forces, made his last stand against the Romans. He was defeated and taken to Rome in chains, where he made a speech to the Senate claiming that he had done nothing wrong, and had only defended his realm as any king would do. He was well treated in comparison with other defeated kings, and was allowed to return to Britain as a puppet king under Roman rule.

He was accompanied on his journey to Rome by members of his family including his daughter Gladys who was re-named Claudia. His son Linus is thought to have arrived later when things were more peaceful. Linus and Claudia both became actively involved in the early church. Linus became the first Bishop of Rome, and Claudia married a Roman Senator called Rufus Pudens. It was probably in the house of Pudens where the Apostle Paul spent his last two years and received visitors. Pudens, Linus and Claudia are all mentioned in 2 Tim. 4:21. Details of the story, together with a number of sources, are given by Malcolm Bowden (1).

Claudia returned to Britain as a successful missionary and made many converts to Christianity.
http://www.annomundi.com/history/early_british_christianity.htm


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(2 Timothy 4:21) Paul sends to Timothy the greetings of “Eubulus, Pudens, Linus, Claudia and all the brethren”. This Claudia – the only woman to be mentioned in that list – is evidently an important
figure in the early Christian community. 
...one tradition states that this Claudia was the wife of Pudens (mentioned in the same letter) and that she was the mother (or perhaps the sister) of Linus (also mentioned) who was the second Bishop of Rome (St Peter’s immediate successor).
Furthermore, historians have tried to find a Claudia, married to a Pudens, at the right period of Roman history: and have come up with the figure of Claudia Rufina,married to Aulus Pudens (a senator and friend of Martial, the poet).

As well as being the friend of St Paul, Claudia and Pudens were also the hosts of St Peter and their house (which became the church of S. Pudentiana in Rome) was the place where St Peter celebrated Mass, and where he ‘held court’ over the universal church. 
https://englishcatholichistoryassoc.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/christianity-in-britain-before-st-augustine-fr-r-whinder-oct-2008.pdf

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an account of the seventy disciples discovered at Mount Athos in 1854 lists Aristobulus as "bishop of Britain".[21] Medieval accounts of King Lucius, Fagan and Deruvian, and Joseph of Arimathea, however, are now usually accounted as pious frauds.

The earliest certain historical evidence of Christianity among the Britons is found in the writings of such early Christian Fathers as Tertullian and Origen in the first years of the 3rd century, although the first Christian communities probably were established at least some decades earlier.
... the earliest known Christian martyrs in Britain—Saint Alban and "Amphibalus"—probably lived in the early 4th century.[24] Julius and Aaron, citizens of Caerleon, were said to have been martyred during the Diocletianic Persecution, although there is no textual or archaeological evidence to support the folk etymology of Lichfield as deriving from another thousand martyrs during the same years. ...Three Romano-British bishops, including Archbishop Restitutus of London, are known to have been present at the Synod of Arles in 314.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_Christianity#History

Later the 2nd c. British king Lucius accepted Christianity.
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The Venerable Bede, writing about AD 740, says: "The Britons preserved the Faith which they had received under King Lucius uncorrupted, and continued in peace and tranquillity until the time of the Emperor Diocletian."

It will be noticed that two distinct events are spoken of above: (1) The foundation of the Church in England by the Disciples of Christ. (2) The acceptance of Christianity by the British Nation under Good King Lucius about AD 170. Britain was the first of all nations to accept Christianity as its national religion.
http://asis.com/users/stag/glastonb.html

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A 2nd-century "word square" has been discovered in Mamucium, the Roman settlement of Manchester. It consists of an anagram of PATER NOSTER carved on a piece of amphora. There has been discussion by academics whether the "word square" is actually a Christian artefact, but if it is, it is one of the earliest examples of early Christianity in Britain.

The earliest confirmed written evidence for Christianity in Britain is a statement by Tertullian, c. 200 AD, in which he described "all the limits of the Spains, and the diverse nations of the Gauls, and the haunts of the Britons, inaccessible to the Romans, but subjugated to Christ".

Archaeological evidence for Christian communities begins to appear in the 3rd and 4th centuries. Small timber churches are suggested at Lincoln and Silchester and baptismal fonts have been found at Icklingham and the Saxon Shore Fort at Richborough. The Icklingham font is made of lead, and visible in the British Museum. A Roman Christian graveyard exists at the same site in Icklingham.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Britain#Christianity


Hinton St. Mary Mosaic, 4th c.

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Christians were THRIVING in Britain before Augustine: Ring confirms Roman converts were more widespread than thought before first missionary arrived

    Ring dates back between 312 and 410 AD was found near Swaffham in Norfolk


It bears a Latin inscription saying 'Antonius, may you live in God', a phrase commonly found on the rings of Roman converts

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2397943/Ring-confirms-Christians-THRIVING-Britain-Augustine.html#ixzz4cPPELUjv


So Cornwall, Glastonbury, and maybe Wales appear to get some of the most attention, although there was the discovery of the ancient square artifact in Manchester.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2017, 02:34:13 AM »

Glastonbury

It is not far from Wales and from the Roman Baths in England.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 02:34:39 AM by rakovsky »
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Offline recent convert

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2017, 06:31:32 AM »
Although I am American, I have visited 2 sites in Wales associated with St. David of Wales (my patron saint). The cathedral of St. David n https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Davids.  And the village of Llandewibrefi. http://www.britainexpress.com/attractions.htm?attraction=586.   https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanddewi_Brefi
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 06:47:19 AM by recent convert »
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2017, 07:43:49 AM »
I haven't visited Glastonbury, although I plan to (if I had a bucket list, it would be near the top). My parish organises an annual pilgrimage to Walsingham, and this year we'll probably make it; it involves a fair bit of walking, and the young one couldn't cope before.

I'm lucky enough to be within easy driving distance from both the monastery of St John the Baptist and the shrine of St Osyth, and I'm looking forward to the monastery at Kilninian being in a state to receive visitors.
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Offline hecma925

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2017, 07:57:29 AM »
I haven't visited Glastonbury, although I plan to (if I had a bucket list, it would be near the top). My parish organises an annual pilgrimage to Walsingham, and this year we'll probably make it; it involves a fair bit of walking, and the young one couldn't cope before.

I'm lucky enough to be within easy driving distance from both the monastery of St John the Baptist and the shrine of St Osyth, and I'm looking forward to the monastery at Kilninian being in a state to receive visitors.

Maybe you can do the pilgrimage that Fr. Seraphim organizes.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2017, 08:26:15 AM »
It is nice that we have some UK posters.
Arachne, are any of those early Christian sites you mentioned?


Cornwall
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 08:26:53 AM by rakovsky »
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2017, 08:41:46 AM »
It is nice that we have some UK posters.
Arachne, are any of those early Christian sites you mentioned?


Cornwall

Depends on how early you're interested in. St John's was founded by Elder Sophrony, but Walsingham dates from the 11th century and St Osyth from the 8th. There are always the ruins in Whitby, Iona and Lindisfarne. Even our parish chapel dates from Norman times, although its foundations are Roman and local tradition claims that it was founded by St Helen herself. :)
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Offline WPM

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2017, 10:06:24 AM »
Not in the U.K. but all the way to Texas.

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2017, 12:52:59 PM »
If the foundations are Roman from Helen's time, it is one of the earliest known sites out of maybe 10 in the UK:
Glastonbury
Cornwall
---Roseland
Litchfield?
Manchester?
Silchester
Lincoln
Wales?
I would have to look into the Hinton St Mary mosaic location

That is all I found in a brief search for the earliest sites.

It's neat you have sites from apostolic times.
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2017, 01:57:31 PM »
Arachne,
Maybe sometime you can share a photo of the Roman foundations.
What city are you in?
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2017, 02:01:02 PM »
Arachne,
Maybe sometime you can share a photo of the Roman foundations.
What city are you in?

Colchester. However, I don't see how it would be possible to take photos of the foundations when more building has been done on top. It's a functioning chapel, not an archaeological dig.
'Evil isn't the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as evil, maybe more so, and it's a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against stupid. That might actually make a difference.'~Harry Dresden

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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2017, 02:01:17 PM »
If the foundations are Roman from Helen's time, it is one of the earliest known sites
...
Litchfield?
Not Litchfield. I thought of it because of the 8th c. Litchfield gospels.
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2017, 02:08:11 PM »
Arachne,
Maybe sometime you can share a photo of the Roman foundations.
What city are you in?

Colchester. However, I don't see how it would be possible to take photos of the foundations when more building has been done on top. It's a functioning chapel, not an archaeological dig.
OK. I understand. I was thinking of a situation like the Cenacle on Mt Zion. The foundations are visible at ground level and date to the first century, but the top is a medieval Gothic construct. In some other old churches, the foundations are visible in the basement or crypt, where sometimes relics are stored.

Here is a photo of the side of the Cenacle. Some writers think that the large solid wall blocks at one section at ground level were taken from the 1st c. Ruins of Jerusalem'so temple.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 02:19:13 PM by rakovsky »
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2017, 03:07:19 PM »

Lincoln, UK


Icklingham, another early site
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 03:12:38 PM by rakovsky »
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2017, 04:08:44 PM »
Arachne,
Maybe sometime you can share a photo of the Roman foundations.
What city are you in?

Colchester. However, I don't see how it would be possible to take photos of the foundations when more building has been done on top. It's a functioning chapel, not an archaeological dig.

Perfect location for a St. Helen or a Sts. Constantine and Helen Orthodox church. Is there one?

I do not remember where I read about this legend. It could have been here (forum).
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2017, 04:40:30 PM »
Quote
Excavations in the 1980s for a new police station near the Maldon Road roundabout unearthed 371 Roman graves and a long narrow building. The building was built between AD 320 and 340. Oriented east to west, an apse was added to the east end in a later phase. The building was divided by a wooden screen and two rows of posts ran down the eastern half forming aisles. The building has been interpreted on strong circumstantial evidence as an early Christian church.[1] If this is correct, it is probably the earliest known Christian church in Britain. The remains have been preserved and are visible from the public footpath.
Source: Wikipedia, "Churches in Colchester "



It says that a 14th century writing says that the still standing St Helena's chapel was a church built by St Helena, and that a 1980s dig revealed the foundation to have been a theatre.

Good info, Arachne.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 04:45:44 PM by rakovsky »
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2017, 05:08:15 PM »
Arachne,
Maybe sometime you can share a photo of the Roman foundations.
What city are you in?

Colchester. However, I don't see how it would be possible to take photos of the foundations when more building has been done on top. It's a functioning chapel, not an archaeological dig.

Perfect location for a St. Helen or a Sts. Constantine and Helen Orthodox church. Is there one?

I do not remember where I read about this legend. It could have been here (forum).

Why yes, there is.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2017, 06:16:17 PM »

Roman Silchester / Calleva Atrebatum


Map of 2nd c. Roman roads showing Calleva.
Province's capitol = Londinium
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 06:16:34 PM by rakovsky »
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2017, 06:26:39 PM »
Why yes, there is.
If you hadn't told me, I wouldn't have known about your city's 4th c. Christian heritage.
Some of the "4th century" Christian sites probably in reality go back much further, but their Christian-specific identity was lost over the centuries.

The UK has many 1st-4th c. Roman sites:
http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryMagazine/DestinationsUK/RomanSites/


London's Roman wall.

The Roman baths look neat.

They are not that far from Glastonbury.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 06:29:21 PM by rakovsky »
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2017, 06:33:10 PM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2017, 07:18:09 PM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service

fish n chips  :police:
I'm making a firm decision to stay with the Orthodox Church.

My point is you should try to fixate on something else. I suggest Christ.

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2017, 08:00:34 PM »

Why yes, there is.

Wow. This is more than I expected, it's providential.
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2017, 08:07:53 PM »

fish n chips  :police:



Yes, absolutely, with the exception of the emoticon.
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2017, 01:35:07 PM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service
You could easily find a Tridentine mass in the US, but I'm curious about Celtic services. Is someone still serving it in good ole Albion?
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 01:35:45 PM by RaphaCam »
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Offline Eruvande

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2017, 10:08:58 PM »
Have been to Glastonbury many a time. Also been to Cornwall and there are a lot of connections to Cornish saints there. St Piran is the one that springs to mind in the middle of the night. Even where I am, not far away near the Clent hills is a very old church dedicated to an ancient saint whose name begins with a K I think. The heritage is all around us if you know what you're looking for.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2017, 10:20:42 PM »
Have been to Glastonbury many a time. Also been to Cornwall and there are a lot of connections to Cornish saints there. St Piran is the one that springs to mind in the middle of the night. Even where I am, not far away near the Clent hills is a very old church dedicated to an ancient saint whose name begins with a K I think. The heritage is all around us if you know what you're looking for.
What I am looking for most are 1st to 2nd c. Remains.

What is glastonbury like. Do they have tours, did you take photos?
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline Mor Ephrem

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2017, 12:04:16 AM »
What I am looking for most are 1st to 2nd c. Remains.

The second coming of YiM!
I'm making a firm decision to stay with the Orthodox Church.

My point is you should try to fixate on something else. I suggest Christ.

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2017, 12:31:01 AM »
My extensive research says Jesus taught miners in Corwall how to smelt tin from ore.

http://asis.com/users/stag/chrstbrt.html
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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2017, 02:52:01 AM »
Even where I am, not far away near the Clent hills is a very old church dedicated to an ancient saint whose name begins with a K I think.

If it's St Kentigern (I can't find any other names beginning with a K), he's quite a ways from his ordinary haunts. :)
« Last Edit: March 30, 2017, 02:52:18 AM by Arachne »
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Offline Iconodule

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2017, 05:48:13 AM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service
You could easily find a Tridentine mass in the US, but I'm curious about Celtic services. Is someone still serving it in good ole Albion?

There is no such thing as a "Celtic Rite."
Quote
But it had not been in Tess's power - nor is it in anybody's power - to feel the whole truth of golden opinions while it is possible to profit by them. She - and how many more - might have ironically said to God with Saint Augustine, "Thou hast counselled a better course than thou hast permitted."
Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

Offline Eruvande

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2017, 08:00:01 AM »
Even where I am, not far away near the Clent hills is a very old church dedicated to an ancient saint whose name begins with a K I think.

If it's St Kentigern (I can't find any other names beginning with a K), he's quite a ways from his ordinary haunts. :)

Asked my husband this morning and he said it's St Kenelm. I don't know much about it, it's more my husband's area of expertise, growing up in this area.
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Offline Eruvande

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #31 on: March 30, 2017, 08:05:11 AM »
Have been to Glastonbury many a time. Also been to Cornwall and there are a lot of connections to Cornish saints there. St Piran is the one that springs to mind in the middle of the night. Even where I am, not far away near the Clent hills is a very old church dedicated to an ancient saint whose name begins with a K I think. The heritage is all around us if you know what you're looking for.
What I am looking for most are 1st to 2nd c. Remains.

What is glastonbury like. Do they have tours, did you take photos?

Gracious, I don't have the smarts to work out the dating for things. The most obvious remains are that of the big Abbey. I do have photos but I don't know where they are, the last time I took photos I had to go to Boots to get them developed. Yes, I think the Abbey does do tours round the ruins.
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2017, 10:57:57 AM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service
You could easily find a Tridentine mass in the US, but I'm curious about Celtic services. Is someone still serving it in good ole Albion?

There is no such thing as a "Celtic Rite."

This is where I  heard  this
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_Rite
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #33 on: March 30, 2017, 08:02:09 PM »
Have been to Glastonbury many a time. Also been to Cornwall
I would like to hear about your travels to these places, Eruvande.

The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #34 on: March 30, 2017, 09:00:08 PM »
Glastonbury Abbey website
http://www.glastonburyabbey.com/


Reconstruction

Quote
three thorn trees grew on Wearyall Hill about 1km south-west of Glastonbury. The trees were very unusual because they fl
owered twice - once in the spring around Easter, and a second time at Christmas.
http://www.glastonburyabbey.com/holy_thorn.php?sid=9ae7fa6f90f4554a855740f430278627

It's quite curious why it would flower at those two times.

Quote
Summer - a Saturday in June - is the high point of the modern-day Glastonbury Pilgrimage. Begun by a few local Somerset churches in 1924, the pilgrimage has become a public expression of personal faith. Groups of worshippers come from all over Britain and Europe. ... On the same day, an Orthodox service is held in the ruins of the Lady Chapel to venerate the icon of Our Lady of Glastonbury; Musicians, choirs and actors also entertain the pilgrims as the day progresses. The day culminates with the Christian multitude celebrating Evensong in the nave of the abbey church at 3.30pm.

In early July, on a Sunday, the Roman Catholic pilgrimage comes to the abbey.
http://www.glastonburyabbey.com/services_pilgrimage.php?sid=9ae7fa6f90f4554a855740f430278627

Quote
Glastonbury Abbey

The abbey was suppressed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII of England. The last abbot, Richard Whiting (Whyting), was hanged, drawn and quartered as a traitor on Glastonbury Tor in 1539.

History
...archaeological investigations by the University of Reading have demonstrated Roman and Saxon occupation of the site.[2] [3] In 1955 Ralegh Radford's excavations uncovered Romano-British pottery at the west end of the cloister.[4] The abbey was founded by Britons and dates at least to the early-7th century.

Decline
...stones were removed in the 17th century, so that by the beginning of the 18th century the abbey was described as a ruin. The only building to survive intact is the Abbot's Kitchen, which served as a Quaker meeting house. Early in the 19th century, gunpowder was used to dislodge further stones and the site became a quarry.

The abbey library was described by John Leland, King Henry VIII's antiquary who visited it, as containing unique copies of ancient histories of England and unique early Christian documents. It seems to have been affected by the fire of 1184, but still housed a remarkable collection until 1539 when it was dispersed at the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glastonbury_Abbey

Way to destroy one's heritage and lose early Christian records.  :-\

Quote
Glastonbury Lake Village was an Iron Age village,... some 3 miles (5 km) north west of Glastonbury. It ... housed around 100 people in five to seven groups of houses, each for an extended family, with sheds and barns, made of hazel and willow covered with reeds, and surrounded either permanently or at certain times by a wooden palisade. The village was built in about 300 BC and occupied into the early Roman period (around 100 AD) when it was abandoned, possibly due to a rise in the water level.[10] It was built on a morass on an artificial foundation of timber....

Sharpham Park is a 300-acre (1.2 km2) historic park, 2 miles (3 km) west of Glastonbury, which dates back to the Bronze Age.


Holy Thorn

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glastonbury

Quote
Romans conquered Great Britain during the first century B.C.E. and established wharves on nearby Bristol Bay, thus enabling Glastonbury to become a shipping area. A legend has it that Joseph of Arimathea, who is mentioned in the Bible as the person who prepared Jesus Christ... for burial after his crucifixion, landed in Bristol Bay and established the first Christian church at Glastonbury. Later, according to some accounts, he traveled by sea and landed in Great Britain, bringing with him the Holy Grail.

The most distinctive and highest of the hills in the area is the Glastonbury Tor ("tor" is an old word for "hill"). An imposing hill, the tor can be seen from as far as 25 miles away. A ruined tower of a Christian chapel is perched on the top of the tor.
http://www.unexplainedstuff.com/Places-of-Mystery-and-Power/Glastonbury.html

I suppose theoretically Joseph of Arimathea could have come to England with the chalice, but it sounds pretty legendary. It seems like it could easily have gotten lost over the 1000 years or so between Joseph's time and the legend's first record.

Quote
The first inhabitants of Glastonbury were stone age farmers. They built wooden track ways across boggy land some of which were preserved and have recently been discovered. In 1892 a 'lake village' was discovered near Glastonbury. It was actually a settlement of some 90 huts built on a wooden platform on wet ground. It flourished in the 1st century BC and the 1st century AD.

Another pre-Roman remain is the Tor, which is a man made hill. To the east of it is a ditch. The Tor may have been a fortress or it may have been a shrine of some kind.
http://www.localhistories.org/glastonbury.html

Quote
Henry Jenner, the old Chief Bard of Cornwall writing an account for the Benedictine Journal Pax in 1916 describing metal workers as "a very old fraternity" with a saying "Joseph was in the tin trade" which reflects their tradition Joseph made his money as a tin merchant, and also once brought "the child Christ and His Mother and landed them at St Michael's Mount." (This is now a tidal islet in Penzance Bay.)


Glastonbury was a sea-port in the Roman era. Later it became an impassable marsh which became a vast freshwater lake after rains.

The 1st-century wattle-n-daub church is thought to have stood on the site where the Lady Chapel stands today.
http://www.storyline-features.co.uk/glastonbury.htm

Whether you agree with its theories or not, the book Glastonbury and the Grail by Justin E. Griffin has interesting information about Roman-era remains in the Glastonbury area.

Relevant places:
  • The Lady Chapel
    The Roman Port
    The 1st c. village remains
    Glastonbury Tor (hill)
    Wearyall Hill (where the "Thorn" was planted)
    The chalice well
« Last Edit: March 30, 2017, 09:03:11 PM by rakovsky »
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #35 on: March 30, 2017, 09:24:13 PM »
About Aristobulus, the 1st c. bishop of Britain:
Quote
In the Martyrologies of the Greek Church, the Greek Menology for March 15 reads:

    "Aristobulus was one of the seventy disciples, and a follower of St. Paul the Apostle, along with whom he preached the Gospel to the whole world, and ministered to him. He was chosen by St. Paul to be the missionary bishop to the land of Britain, inhabited by a very warlike and fierce race. By them he was often scourged, and repeatedly dragged as a criminal through their towns, yet he converted many of them to Christianity. He was there martyred after he had built churches and ordained deacons and priests for the island."

Haleca, bishop of Augusta, says in the Halecae Fragmenta in Martyr that "the memory of many martyrs is celebrated by the Britons, especially that of St. Aristobulus, one of the seventy disciples."

Dortheus, bishop of Tyre in 303 A.D. says: "Aristobulus, whom Paul saluted, writing to the Romans, was Bishop of Britain" (Synopsis de Apostol., Synops. 23, "Aristobulus").

http://www.hope-of-israel.org/1stcent.htm

Quote
    According to the compilers of the Synaxarion...:
            Apostle Peter who, after visiting Milan, had "passed over to the island of Britain, now called England, (where) he spent many years and turned many erring Gentiles to faith in Christ";
            Apostle Aristobulus (brother of St. Barnabas), who is called the Apostle of Britain and who was its first bishop;
            Apostle Simon the Canaanite and Zealot. In these Islands, the Celtic Church had shone forth - especially during the glorious period known as the "Age of Saints" when its missionaries preached throughout much of Europe, becoming 'Equals to the Apostles'.

ca. 155-222 Tertullian wrote that Britain had received and accepted the Gospel in his life time.[ Tertullian wrote that Britain had received and accepted the Gospel in his life time: "All the limits of the Spains, and the diverse nations of the Gauls, and the haunts of the Britons--inaccessible to the Romans, but subjugated to Christ."]
167 Most commonly held date that Phagan and Deruvian sent by Eleutherius to convert the Britons to Christianity
ca. 170-236 Hippolytus of Rome identifies Apostle Aristobulus listed in Romans 16:10 with Joseph of Arimathea and states that they ended up becoming Shepherds of Britain.
180 Protomartyr of Wales, St. Dyfan of Merthyr martyred at Merthyr Dyfan, Wales
208 Tertullian writes that Christ has followers on the far side of the Roman wall in Britain where Roman legions have not yet penetrated.
https://orthodoxwiki.org/Timeline_of_Orthodoxy_in_the_British_Isles

Quote
Saint Aristobulus is one of the 72 disciples commissioned by our Lord Jesus to preach the coming of the Kingdom. Saint Paul mentions him in Romans 16:11. He has been identified with Zebedee, the father of the "sons of Thunder," Saints James and John. He is said to be St. Peter's father-in-law, and to have been followed to Britain by his brother Barnabas. Like the others, Barnabas returned, but Aristobulus is said to have met a martyr's death at the age of 99 in the mountainous heart of Wales. (Benedictines).
http://celticsaints.org/2017/0316a.html
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline Iconodule

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2017, 09:34:19 PM »
Pilgrimage Checklist if I ever go to UK
  • Visit 1st-4th c. church remains & artifacts
  • Visit Roman ruins near them
  • Attend Tridentine Mass
  • Attend Celtic Rite service
You could easily find a Tridentine mass in the US, but I'm curious about Celtic services. Is someone still serving it in good ole Albion?

There is no such thing as a "Celtic Rite."

This is where I  heard  this
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_Rite

As the first paragraph says, the term is a catch-all for a bunch of different things. Nowadays if someone claims to use "the Celtic rite" he is in all likelihood playing vagante fantasy games.
Quote
But it had not been in Tess's power - nor is it in anybody's power - to feel the whole truth of golden opinions while it is possible to profit by them. She - and how many more - might have ironically said to God with Saint Augustine, "Thou hast counselled a better course than thou hast permitted."
Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #37 on: March 30, 2017, 10:25:55 PM »


As the first paragraph says, the term is a catch-all for a bunch of different things. Nowadays if someone claims to use "the Celtic rite" he is in all likelihood playing vagante fantasy games.
I would look for the closest thing to the British Celtic Rite. Maybe that would be the post-Celtic Saxon Sarum Rite. Maybe that would just be the Western Rite EO service. Maybe all we have left is a series of chapel prayers. It is something I would look into more.
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #38 on: March 31, 2017, 03:57:24 AM »
Peter went to Rome and antioch, Mark went to Alexandria, and James was in Jerusalem. Based on this pattern, it looks like the early Christians in Britain would have tried to settle at least partly in the capitol, londinium.

4th c. Pottery with chi rho sign found in West London:
Quote
The pottery was made in Oxfordshire in the 4th century, rather than imported, so the symbol suggests a very early Thames-side Christian community.
Source: The Guardian
Theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/mar/24/pottery-fragment-christian-settlement-roman-london
« Last Edit: March 31, 2017, 04:03:57 AM by rakovsky »
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline Subdeacon Michael

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #39 on: April 03, 2017, 08:04:39 PM »
I've made group and personal pilgrimages to:
  • St Winefride's well, in Holywell
  • St Alban's shrine, in St Alban's
  • St Melangell's shrine, in Pennant Melangell
  • St Eanswythe's shrine, in Folkestone
  • St Cuthbert's tomb, in Durham
  • St Bertelin's shrine, in Ilam
  • St Chad's shrine, in Lichfield (although his relics in modern times are in Birmingham)
  • The holy well of the Mother of God, in Ladyewell

« Last Edit: April 03, 2017, 08:05:29 PM by Subdeacon Michael »
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #40 on: April 03, 2017, 10:39:40 PM »
Thanks for sharing.
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #41 on: April 07, 2017, 03:28:33 PM »




King Arthur, 2004 movie about c.400 Roman Britain
Trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqZh1tg_bF4
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 03:28:54 PM by rakovsky »
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20

Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #42 on: April 07, 2017, 04:21:56 PM »
Colchester turns out to be the first capitol of Roman Britain. Based on the pattern of the apostles going to the main cities and capitols of the cities they evangelized it, one would expect that they went to this city.
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Camulodunum

The Roman town began life as a Roman Legionary base constructed in the AD 40s on the site of the Brythonic-Celtic fortress following its conquest by the Emperor Claudius.[5] After the early town was destroyed during the Iceni rebellion in 60/1 AD, it was rebuilt, reaching its zenith in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. The town was home to a large classical Temple, two theatres (including Britain's largest), several Romano-British temples, Britain's only known chariot circus, Britain's first town walls, several large cemeteries and over 50 known mosaics and tessellated pavements.It may have reached a population of 30,000 at its height. ... tensions arose in 60/61 when the Roman authorities used the death of Prasutagus as a pretext for seizing the Iceni client state from his widow Boudica. ... After the Romans under governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus finally defeated the uprising, the Procurator of the province moved his seat to the newly established commercial settlement of Londinium (London).
...
To the west of the temple on the modern Maidenburgh Street was a 3,000-seat capacity Roman theatre, which now has the Norman chapel of St Helena built into the corner of it,[3] currently open to public viewing.[3][31] Opposite the Temple, on the south side of the Decumanus Maximus, the remains of a possible Basilica have been identified.

Christianity in the Late Roman Town
During [the 4th c.] the late Roman church at Butt Road[7] just outside the town walls was built with its associated cemetery containing over 650 graves (some containing fragments of Chinese silk), and may be one of the earliest churches in Britain.[5][62] A strong numismatic chronology has been obtained from the over 500 coins found at the site, and puts its date from 320 to c.425.[75] Five of the extramural pagan Romano-British Temples were abandoned in c.300, whilst Temple II at Sheepen was rebuilt in 350 and continued in existence until c. 375.[78][79] Temple X outside of the Balkerne Gate had its ambulatory demolished in 325-50 leaving just its Cella, perhaps repurposed as a Christian temple.[32] A nearby shrine may also have survived into the late 4th century.[32] Several other possible churches or Christian buildings have been postulated, such as Building 127 at Culver Street and possible Roman remains beneath St Helena’s Chapel, St Nicholas Church and Roman "vaults" beneath St Botolph's Priory which might be a late-Roman Martyrium, although over interpretations include a bath-house.[79] The Temple of Claudius, which underwent large-scale structural additions in the 4th century, may also have been repurposed as a Christian church, as a Chi Rho symbol carved on a piece of Roman pottery found in the vicinity of the temenos.[5] Further Roman Christian objects found in the town include a candlestick from Balkerne Lane inscribed with an Iota Chi symbol and a bronze spoon with AETERNVS VITA written on it.[62][81] Three British Bishops attended the Council of Arles in 314, one from London, one from York and a third from a place whose first word is Colonia but whose second word is too corrupted to make out with any certainty, but has been interpreted as something like Camulodensium
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camulodunum










(Click to enlarge)

I am looking at you in your Coolness, Arachne8)

Oldest buildings in UK include:
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Temple of Claudius (Colchester Castle)    Colchester, Essex, England    c. 60    
The substantial podium and vaults are of the Roman temple (of Camulodunum, capital of Britain).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oldest_buildings_in_the_United_Kingdom

Oldest Churches:
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Saint Helen's Chapel    Colchester, Essex, England    c. 330    
This small church, now a Greek Orthodox church near the Roman Temple, now Colchester Castle is the earliest surviving church in the British Isles. It was built in the capital of Roman Britain in the early to mid 300s AD on the instructions of Saint Helen, mother of Saint Constantine, the Roman Emperor Constantine.

Beehive cells    Eileach an Naoimh, Argyll, Scotland    6th century    
The monastic centre on this island was founded by St. Brendan the Navigator in 542. The oldest remains include a double beehive cell and a grave and cross-slab associated with Eithne the mother of Columba. These are the oldest extant church buildings in Scotland and possibly Britain

St Martin's Church, Canterbury    Canterbury, Kent    597    

The oldest church building in England, still functioning as a church. St Martin's was the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th century before Augustine arrived from Rome.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oldest_buildings_in_the_United_Kingdom


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AD597 – St Martin, Canterbury, Kent



St Martin’s, Canterbury, is part of the Canterbury world heritage site and is the oldest church in England still being used for its original purpose. It was founded around AD597 and originally functioned as the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent. Queen Bertha was a Christian married to a pagan – King Ethelbert. She is said by Bede to have prayed for the missionaries being sent from Rome, including Augustine, who was to become the first Archbishop of Canterbury and found the nearby Canterbury Cathedral. Much of the building you see today is later than this, although you can see Roman brick which was taken from nearby Roman sites, in the nave wall, and the remains of a Roman tomb have also been incorporated into the building. This oldest of English churches is an evocative and fascinating place to visit.
http://www.churchdays.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=12&Itemid=144

Old Photo of St. Martin's


Modern day


Canterbury Cathedral
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The cathedral's first bishop was Augustine of Canterbury, previously abbot of St. Andrew's Benedictine Abbey in Rome; when other dioceses were founded in England he was made archbishop. He was sent by Pope Gregory the Great in 596 as a missionary to the Anglo-Saxons. Augustine founded the cathedral in 597 and dedicated it to Jesus Christ, the Holy Saviour.[3]

Augustine also founded the Abbey of St. Peter and Paul outside the city walls. This was later rededicated to St. Augustine himself and was for many centuries the burial place of the successive archbishops. The abbey is part of the World Heritage Site of Canterbury, along with the cathedral and the ancient Church of St Martin.[4]
Anglo-Saxon
Bede recorded that Augustine reused a former Roman church. The oldest remains found during excavations beneath the present nave in 1993 were, however, parts of the foundations of an Anglo-Saxon building, which had been constructed across a Roman road.[5][6] They indicate that the original church consisted of a nave, possibly with a narthex, and side-chapels to the north and south. A smaller subsidiary building was found to the south-west of these foundations.[6] During the ninth or tenth century this church was replaced by a larger structure (49 m. by 23 m.) with a squared west end. It appears to have had a square central tower.[6] The eleventh century chronicler Eadmer, who had known the Saxon cathedral as a boy, wrote that, in its arrangement, it resembled St Peter's in Rome, indicating that it was of basilican form, with an eastern apse.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_Cathedral
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 04:40:00 PM by rakovsky »
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Offline rakovsky

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Re: Have those of you in the UK visited early Christian sites there?
« Reply #43 on: April 08, 2017, 05:25:31 PM »
About Simon the Zealot:

Dorotheus, bishop of Trye (300 AD) writes: "Simon Zelotes traversed all Mauritania, and the regions of the Africans, preaching Christ. He was at last crucified, slain, and buried in Britain. "

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We conclude Simon Zelotes suffered in the east of Britain, perhaps, as tradition affirms, in the vicinity of Caistor, under the prefecture of Caius Decius, the officer whose atrocities were the immediate cause of the Boadicean war. ( "St.Paul in Britain," R.W.Morgan, p.9)


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Its name comes from the Anglo-Saxon ceaster ("Roman camp" or "town") and was given in the Domesday Book as Castre. Only a few fragments of the 4th-century walls remain; for example, the original Roman wall is visible on the southern boundary of the parish church of St Peter and St Paul.[1] The area occupied by the fortress is now classified as a Scheduled Ancient Monument.
...
According to a local tradition, one of Jesus's 12 apostles, Simon the Zealot, came to England, where he is supposed to have been martyred somewhere in the vicinity of Casitor. He was reputedly crucified on the orders of a Roman procurator called Catus Decianus on 10 May AD61. (However, there are competing theories as to what became of Simon the Zealot.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caistor

Sean McDowell writes in "The Fate of the Apostles":
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Tertullian mentions Christians in britain at the end of the 2nd century.... a variety of means for his fate claim he was crucified, slain with a sword, hacked to death with an axe and even died peacefully.

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...yea even to Britain itself. Here he is said to have preached and wrought many miracles, and after infinite troubles and difficulties which he under-went, suffered martyrdom for the faith of Christ, being crucified by the infidels and buried among them.

Others indeed affirm, that after he had preached the gospel in Egypt be went to Mesopotamia, where be met with St.Jude the Apostle and together with him took his journey into Persia where, having gained a considerable harvest to the Christian Faith, they were both crowned with martyrdom: but this is granted by all learned men to be fabulous, wanting all clear foundation in Antiquity to stand on.
...
And, if we may believe our own Authors, he came into these Western Parts, as far as our island of Great Britain; where having converted great Multitudes, with manifold Hardships and Persecutions, he at last suffered Martrydom by Crucifixion, as 'tis recorded in the Greek Menologies. But Bede, Vsuardus, and Ado, place his Martyrdom in Persia, at a City called Suanir, where they say the idolatrous Priests put him to Death; and for this they allege the Authority of Eusebius his Martyrology translated by St.Jerome; which, though it be not without many Faults, nor entirely either Eusebius's or St.Jerome's hath yet the advantage of Antiquity above any now extant.

(The Lives and Deaths of the Holy Apostles," Dorman Newman, 1685)
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In the year. A.D.44 a Claudian Edict expelled the Christian leaders from Rome. Many of them sought sanctuary in Britain.
http://www.keithhunt.com/Twelve16.html

The most widespread tradition is that after evangelizing in Egypt, Simon joined Jude in Persia and Armenia or Beirut, Lebanon, where both were martyred in 65 AD. This version is the one found in the Golden Legend. He may have suffered crucifixion as the Bishop of Jerusalem.
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One tradition states that he traveled in the Middle East and Africa. Christian Ethiopians claim that he was crucified in Samaria, while Justus Lipsius writes that he was sawn in half at Suanir, Persia.[2] However, Moses of Chorene writes that he was martyred at Weriosphora in Caucasian Iberia.[2] Tradition also claims he died peacefully at Edessa.[12] Another tradition says he visited Britain— In his 2nd mission to Britain, he arrived during 1st year of Boadicean War 60 AD. He was crucified May 10, 61AD by the Roman Catus Decianus, at Caistor, modern-day Lincolnshire, Britain, See The Drama of the Lost Disciples, p.159 by George F. Jowett.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_the_Zealot
The ocean, impassable by men, and the world beyond it are directed by the same ordinances of the Master. ~ I Clement 20