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Author Topic: Do Muslims worship same God as Christians?  (Read 2828 times) Average Rating: 0
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Theophilos78
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« Reply #45 on: January 29, 2011, 04:00:16 PM »


That's true. That doesn't change the fact that they are not that different from Mohammedian regulations.

It is because Muhammad adopted some of those laws from Judaism although his innovated religion denied that God had lived in the midst of the Israelites. The connection in the Torah between religious regulations and God's presence in Israel is missing from the Qur'an.

Our God doesn't seem to have anything against rather harsh state laws. For me it seems that Jesus' milderness is not because God is against more harsher state laws but because He was setting an example how individual Christians should act.

However, the context of the narrative about the woman caught in adultery in John 8 says otherwise by making a comparison between Moses' teachings and Jesus' interpretation of those teachings. A similar comparison can be found in Jesus' sermon on the mount.

If Muhammed had been only a spiritual leader and not a political one I'd guess that his regulations might have also been much milder.

He probably would have no regulations then.
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Theophilos78
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« Reply #46 on: January 29, 2011, 04:08:26 PM »

For a fair discussion and critique we must first figure out Marcion's stance by reading some examples of his peculiar textual modifications to the New Testament:

His cardinal doctrine was the opposition of the Old Testament to the New, and this doctrine he had amply illustrated in his great (lost) work, Antithesis, or "Contrasts". In order, however, to make the contrast perfect he had to omit much of the New Testament writings and to manipulate the rest. He took one Gospel out of the four, and accepted only ten Epistles of St. Paul. Marcion's Gospel was based on our canonical St. Luke with omission of the first two chapters. The text has been as far as possible restored by Th. Zahn, "Geschichte d. N.T. Kanons", II, 456-494, from all available sources especially Epiphanius, who made a collection of 78 passages. Marcion's changes mainly consist in omissions where he modifies the text.

The modifications are slight thus:
"I give Thee thanks, Father, God of heaven and earth," is changed to "I give thanks, Father, Lord of heaven".

"O foolish and hard of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken", is changed into, "O foolish and hard of heart to believe in all that I have told you."

Sometimes slight additions are made:
 "We found this one subverting our nation" (the accusation of the Jews before Pilate) receives the addition: "and destroying the law and the prophets."  Grin

A similar process was followed with the Epistles of St. Paul. By the omission of a single preposition Marcion had coined a text in favor of his doctrine out of Ephesians 3:10: "the mystery which from the beginning of the world has been hidden from the God who created all things" (omitting en before theo).


Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09645c.htm
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