OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 22, 2014, 01:11:28 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: G.K. Chesterton  (Read 3486 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« on: January 24, 2011, 11:13:15 PM »

Among 20th century authors he is the greatest defender of the Christian faith, and though he converted from (old) Anglicanism to Catholicism later in his life, it can be said fairly truly that outside of his remarks on the Papacy and specific post-schism saints, anywhere he says 'Catholic' you can confidently insert 'Orthodox'.

What I'd like to do here is provide links via which you can, with little time and effort, better acquaint yourself with the thinker who set CS Lewis straight, and outclasses just about anyone now living in terms of sheer common sense. He was a master of paradox (it helps to understand that a paradox is really an apparent contradiction, rather than an actual contradiction), which is succinct expression of complex reality, and of expressing it in (often humorous) one-liners expressing deep truths.

I also would like to post quotations from his works here, as often as I can. Quotations can provide 'soundbite' versions that give you a quick sense of the man's intelligence and depth.

Enough said. Here is a pretty good introduction:
http://www.chesterton.org/discover/who.html

Quote
When he drops one doctrine after another in a refined scepticism, when he
declines to tie himself to a system, when he says that he has outgrown
definitions, when he says that he disbelieves in finality, when, in his own
imagination, he sits as God, holding no form of creed but contemplating all, then
he is by that very process sinking slowly backwards into the vagueness of the
vagrant animals and the unconsciousness of the grass. Trees have no dogmas.
Turnips are singularly broad-minded.
The fatal flaws of relativism. To think that wisdom is still ignored continuously, right up to this very moment, when it should have been allowed to change the world.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2011, 11:19:40 PM »

What's Wrong with the World

By Dale Ahlquist



Chesterton's book, What's Wrong with the World, was supposedly written in 1910. But there is good evidence that it was actually written today.

Our society is experiencing exactly the crisis that Chesterton warned us about almost a century ago. There is a greater disparity than ever between the rich and poor. Our families are falling apart, our schools are in utter chaos, our basic freedoms are under assault. It affects every one of us. As Chesterton says, "Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick."

But while we agree about the evil, we no longer agree about the good. The main thing that is wrong with the world is that we do not ask what is right. It is the loss of ideals that makes reform such a difficult task.

Some people say that idealism is impractical. But Chesterton says, "Idealism is only considering everything in its practical essence." In other words, idealism is common sense. It is what the common man knows is right, in spite of all the voices telling him it is impractical or unrealistic or out-dated. And when Chesterton says idealism, he means the Christian ideal. "The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried." It would mean the ideal house and the happy family, the holy family of history. It would mean making laws that respect the family as the most important unit of society, and laws which are moral and respect religious principles. It would mean the widespread distribution of property and capital to provide for greater justice and liberty. It would mean not being afraid to teach the truth to our children. But we have left the truth behind us. And instead of turning around and going back and fixing things, we rush madly forward towards we know not what, and call ourselves, "progressive." Instead of the solid family and the church and the republic being held up as ideals, these things are now assailed by those who have never known them, or by those who have failed to fulfill them. "Men invent new ideals because they are afraid to attempt old ideals. They look forward with enthusiasm, because they are afraid to look back."

Although this book is a work of non-fiction, Chesterton introduces us to two characters: Hudge and Gudge. Well, three characters: he also introduces us to Jones. Hudge and Gudge are the enemies of Jones. Simply put, Hudge is Big Government and Gudge is Big Business. And Jones? Jones is the common man. "This man Jones has always desired ordinary things; he has married for love, he has chosen or built a small house that fits like a coat; he is ready to be great grandfather and a local [hero]." But something has gone wrong. Hudge and Gudge have conspired against Jones to take away his property, his independence, and his dignity.

The home is the only place of liberty. "Property is merely the art of democracy. It means that every man should have something that he can shape in his own image…To give nearly everybody ordinary houses would please nearly everybody." But in a society where most people cannot afford their own home, and they cannot properly support themselves but have to be someone else's wage slave, easily sacked, easily replaced and displaced, having to rely on the government to supplement their needs, in other words, when they are totally at the mercy of Hudge and Gudge, it means enormous pressure is put on the family, and it means the society will crumble from the bottom up. The society is especially in danger when the common man, left reeling by the loss of religion, of home, of family, is not even sure what he wants any more.
Man has always lost his way. He has been a tramp ever since Eden; but he always knew, or thought he knew, what he was looking for. Every man has a house somewhere in the elaborate cosmos; his house waits for him. . . But in the bleak and blinding hail of skepticism to which he has been now so long subjected , he has begun for the first time to be chilled, not merely in his hopes, but in his desires. For the first time in history he begins really to doubt the object of his wanderings on earth. He has always lost his way; but now he has lost his address.

One of the most famous lines in all of Chesterton's writings is found in this book: "If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly." For some reason, people puzzle on this. Or else use it to defend their own slovenly ways. But it is a ringing defense of the amateur, the person who does a wide variety of things out of love rather than one specialized thing out of mere professionalism. The person who best understands the "uproarious amateurishness of the universe" is the woman, the mother who has to be the first to explain the entire universe to a child. When the mother is pulled out of the home and made a specialist, working for Hudge and Gudge, the child is left to be raised by "experts." Thus, both the mother and the child become narrower. And so does the whole society as the family of course is ripped apart. And so is every integral element of society torn apart from everything else. The world, says Chesterton, "is one wild divorce court." Religion is banned from the classroom. So are the parents. So is common sense. Each subject is taught in a vacuum. Each profession is increasingly narrow. People more know more and more about less and less. What's wrong with the world? Take a good look around.

http://www.chesterton.org/discover/lectures/16whatswrong.html

And one more thing, for all the 'liberals' and 'conservatives' out there...

The key to Chesterton's politics is that he refused to take part in the debate between Hudge and Gudge, but rather judged them both by the test of Jones. What, he asked had Gudge, the industrial-capitalist, done to strengthen the family of Jones? What had Hudge, the socialist-idealist, done to strengthen the family of Jones?

Gudge rules by a coarse and cruel system of sacking and sweating and bi-sexual toil, which is totally inconsistent with the family and is bound to destroy it. And Hudge calls a women’s work freedom to live her own life, and says the family is something we shall soon gloriously outgrow.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 11:20:42 PM by Aposphet » Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Red A.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 188


« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2011, 12:07:39 AM »

http://librivox.org/whats-wrong-with-the-world-by-gk-chesterton/

You can download the book on mp3 here for free.
Logged
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2011, 12:19:22 AM »

Or read all of his works here:  Smiley

http://www.gkc.org.uk/gkc/books/

The Everlasting Man is his greatest work and probably the best defense I've ever read on Christianity.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,440



WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2011, 12:47:47 AM »

Also on the topic "What's Wrong With the World" when the London Times invited authors to submit essays on just that theme Chesterton gave us this brilliant contribution:

"Dear sirs, I am.  Sincerely yours, GK Chesterton."

 Cheesy

Leaving aside his non-fiction works his Father Brown series was some of the best writing submitted to the mystery genre.
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
theo philosopher
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Self-Ruled Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 315



« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2011, 02:10:23 AM »

What would the world be without Chesterton? No Lewis or Tolkien for one. From there, you can see the problem.

I'm partial to his quote on Christmas being in the winter:

"Any one thinking of the Holy Child as born in December would mean by it exactly what we mean by it; that Christ is not merely a summer sun of the prosperous but a winter fire for the unfortunate."
Logged

“Wherefore, then, death approaches, gulps down the bait of the body, and is pierced by the hook of the divinity. Then, having tasted of the sinless and life-giving body, it is destroyed and gives up all those whom it had swallowed down of old." - St. John of Damascus
quietmorning
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,378


St. Photini


WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2011, 08:20:36 AM »

I was wondering.  I have the book "Orthodoxy" but was wondering if I should read it because I wasn't sure if it was Orthodoxy from a RC perspective or an Eastern Orthodox perspective.  I will dig in, now.  Cheesy
Logged

In His Mercy,
BethAnna
minasoliman
Mr., Sir, Dude, Guy, Male, tr. Minas in Greek, Menes in white people Egyptologists :-P
Moderator
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 12,674


Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)


« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2011, 12:08:50 PM »

I read also author and minister George Macdonald was a big influence on both Chesterton and Lewis.
Logged

Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2011, 05:13:33 PM »

I was wondering.  I have the book "Orthodoxy" but was wondering if I should read it because I wasn't sure if it was Orthodoxy from a RC perspective or an Eastern Orthodox perspective.  I will dig in, now.  Cheesy

Anywhere he says 'Catholic' you can confidently insert 'Orthodox'.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Papist
Patriarch of Pontification
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Byzantine
Posts: 12,359


Praying for the Christians in Iraq


« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2011, 05:24:42 PM »

Chesterton wasn't even Catholic when he wrote Orthodoxy. He was still an Anglican at the time.
Logged

You are right. I apologize for having sacked Constantinople. I really need to stop doing that.
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2011, 09:37:17 PM »

My favorite passage from Chesterton's works...

“Last and most important, it is exactly this which explains what is so inexplicable to all the modern critics of the history of Christianity. I mean the monstrous wars about small points of theology, the earthquakes of emotion about a gesture or a word. It was only a matter of an inch; but an inch is everything when you are balancing. The Church could not afford to swerve a hair's breadth on some things if she was to continue her great and daring experiment of the irregular equilibrium. Once let one idea become less powerful and some other idea would become too powerful. It was no flock of sheep the Christian shepherd was leading, but a herd of bulls and tigers, of terrible ideals and devouring doctrines, each one of them strong enough to turn to a false religion and lay waste the world.

Remember that the Church went in specifically for dangerous ideas; she was a lion tamer. The idea of birth through a Holy Spirit, of the death of a divine being, of the forgiveness of sins, or the fulfilment of prophecies, are ideas which, any one can see, need but a touch to turn them into something blasphemous or ferocious. The smallest link was let drop by the artificers of the Mediterranean, and the lion of ancestral pessimism burst his chain in the forgotten forests of the north. Of these theological equalisations I have to speak afterwards. Here it is enough to notice that if some small mistake were made in doctrine, huge blunders might be made in human happiness. A sentence phrased wrong about the nature of symbolism would have broken all the best statues in Europe. A slip in the definitions might stop all the dances; might wither all the Christmas trees or break all the Easter eggs. Doctrines had to be defined within strict limits, even in order that man might enjoy general human liberties. The Church had to be careful, if only that the world might be careless.

This is the thrilling romance of Orthodoxy. People have fallen into a foolish habit of speaking of orthodoxy as something heavy, humdrum, and safe. There never was anything so perilous or so exciting as orthodoxy. It was sanity: and to be sane is more dramatic than to be mad. It was the equilibrium of a man behind madly rushing horses, seeming to stoop this way and to sway that, yet in every attitude having the grace of statuary and the accuracy of arithmetic. The Church in its early days went fierce and fast with any warhorse; yet it is utterly unhistoric to say that she merely went mad along one idea, like a vulgar fanaticism. She swerved to left and right, so exactly as to avoid enormous obstacles. She left on one hand the huge bulk of Arianism, buttressed by all the worldly powers to make Christianity too worldly. The next instant she was swerving to avoid an orientalism, which would have made it too unworldly.

The orthodox Church never took the tame course or accepted the conventions; the orthodox Church was never respectable. It would have been easier to have accepted the earthly power of the Arians. It would have been easy, in the Calvinistic seventeenth century, to fall into the bottomless pit of predestination. It is easy to be a madman: it is easy to be a heretic. It is always easy to let the age have its head; the difficult thing is to keep one's own. It is always easy to be a modernist; as it is easy to be a snob. To have fallen into any of those open traps of error and exaggeration which fashion after fashion and sect after sect set along the historic path of Christendom -- that would indeed have been simple. It is always simple to fall; there are an infinity of angles at which one falls, only one at which one stands. To have fallen into any one of the fads from Gnosticism to Christian Science would indeed have been obvious and tame. But to have avoided them all has been one whirling adventure; and in my vision the heavenly chariot flies thundering through the ages, the dull heresies sprawling and prostrate, the wild truth reeling but erect.” - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy: The Romance of the Faith
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2011, 09:38:59 PM »

As an aside, the only biography of Chesterton that I've read is Gilbert Keith Chesterton by Maisie Ward, which I enjoyed tremendously. Any other biographies that you all would recommend on G.K.?
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
theistgal
Byzantine (Ruthenian) Catholic gadfly
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Follower of Jesus Christ
Jurisdiction: Byzantine Catholic
Posts: 2,082


don't even go there!


« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2011, 12:20:14 AM »

I find it amusing that Amazon.com consistently classifies Chesterton's "Orthodoxy" under "Eastern Orthodoxy".
Logged

"Sometimes, you just gotta say, 'OK, I still have nine live, two-headed animals' and move on.'' (owner of Coney Island freak show, upon learning he'd been outbid on a 5-legged puppy)
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2011, 12:28:15 AM »

My favorite passage from Chesterton's works...

“Last and most important, it is exactly this which explains what is so inexplicable to all the modern critics of the history of Christianity. I mean the monstrous wars about small points of theology, the earthquakes of emotion about a gesture or a word. It was only a matter of an inch; but an inch is everything when you are balancing. The Church could not afford to swerve a hair's breadth on some things if she was to continue her great and daring experiment of the irregular equilibrium. Once let one idea become less powerful and some other idea would become too powerful. It was no flock of sheep the Christian shepherd was leading, but a herd of bulls and tigers, of terrible ideals and devouring doctrines, each one of them strong enough to turn to a false religion and lay waste the world.

Remember that the Church went in specifically for dangerous ideas; she was a lion tamer. The idea of birth through a Holy Spirit, of the death of a divine being, of the forgiveness of sins, or the fulfilment of prophecies, are ideas which, any one can see, need but a touch to turn them into something blasphemous or ferocious. The smallest link was let drop by the artificers of the Mediterranean, and the lion of ancestral pessimism burst his chain in the forgotten forests of the north. Of these theological equalisations I have to speak afterwards. Here it is enough to notice that if some small mistake were made in doctrine, huge blunders might be made in human happiness. A sentence phrased wrong about the nature of symbolism would have broken all the best statues in Europe. A slip in the definitions might stop all the dances; might wither all the Christmas trees or break all the Easter eggs. Doctrines had to be defined within strict limits, even in order that man might enjoy general human liberties. The Church had to be careful, if only that the world might be careless.

This is the thrilling romance of Orthodoxy. People have fallen into a foolish habit of speaking of orthodoxy as something heavy, humdrum, and safe. There never was anything so perilous or so exciting as orthodoxy. It was sanity: and to be sane is more dramatic than to be mad. It was the equilibrium of a man behind madly rushing horses, seeming to stoop this way and to sway that, yet in every attitude having the grace of statuary and the accuracy of arithmetic. The Church in its early days went fierce and fast with any warhorse; yet it is utterly unhistoric to say that she merely went mad along one idea, like a vulgar fanaticism. She swerved to left and right, so exactly as to avoid enormous obstacles. She left on one hand the huge bulk of Arianism, buttressed by all the worldly powers to make Christianity too worldly. The next instant she was swerving to avoid an orientalism, which would have made it too unworldly.

The orthodox Church never took the tame course or accepted the conventions; the orthodox Church was never respectable. It would have been easier to have accepted the earthly power of the Arians. It would have been easy, in the Calvinistic seventeenth century, to fall into the bottomless pit of predestination. It is easy to be a madman: it is easy to be a heretic. It is always easy to let the age have its head; the difficult thing is to keep one's own. It is always easy to be a modernist; as it is easy to be a snob. To have fallen into any of those open traps of error and exaggeration which fashion after fashion and sect after sect set along the historic path of Christendom -- that would indeed have been simple. It is always simple to fall; there are an infinity of angles at which one falls, only one at which one stands. To have fallen into any one of the fads from Gnosticism to Christian Science would indeed have been obvious and tame. But to have avoided them all has been one whirling adventure; and in my vision the heavenly chariot flies thundering through the ages, the dull heresies sprawling and prostrate, the wild truth reeling but erect.” - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy: The Romance of the Faith

Wow.  Shocked Shocked Shocked
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
lubeltri
Latin Catholic layman
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Archdiocese of Boston
Posts: 3,795



« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2011, 01:40:42 AM »

Check this hilarious video out to hear Chesterton speak:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4wUYTMcXBE
Logged
Cognomen
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: Phyletism Rules, OK
Posts: 1,968


Ungrateful Biped


« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2011, 02:09:21 AM »

Cheesy Love it.
Logged

North American Eastern Orthodox Parish Council Delegate for the Canonization of Saints Twin Towers and Pentagon, as well as the Propagation of the Doctrine of the Assumption of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 (NAEOPCDCSTTPPDAMAFM®).
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2011, 11:29:39 PM »

Once I looked down at my bootlaces
Who gave me my bootlaces?
The bootmaker? Bah!
Who gave the bootmaker himself?
What did I ever do that I should be given bootlaces?

--G.K. Chesterton

Don't know why, but I've always like that one.
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #17 on: August 05, 2012, 08:52:05 PM »

I also would like to post quotations from his works here, as often as I can. Quotations can provide 'soundbite' versions that give you a quick sense of the man's intelligence and depth.

*Ahem*  Cool
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2012, 09:37:59 PM »

LOL.

I'm still learning about his distributivism. However we both agree that we need to focus on man and not the benefit of the government and corporation.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2012, 09:39:57 PM by Achronos » Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2012, 10:18:49 PM »

I should have pulled some quotes from the biography I read of him recently. Unfortunately I didn't think of this thread at the time, and the library reclaimed their book.
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
JamesRottnek
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Anglican
Jurisdiction: Episcopal Diocese of Arizona
Posts: 5,121


I am Bibleman; putting 'the' back in the Ukraine


« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2012, 10:55:15 PM »

What would the world be without Chesterton? No Lewis or Tolkien for one. From there, you can see the problem.


I think you and I have a different understanding of the term 'problem.'
Logged

I know a secret about a former Supreme Court Justice.  Can you guess what it is?

The greatest tragedy in the world is when a cigarette ends.

American Spirits - the eco-friendly cigarette.

Preston Robert Kinney (September 8th, 1997-August 14, 2011
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2012, 09:33:19 PM »

What would the world be without Chesterton? No Lewis or Tolkien for one. From there, you can see the problem.


I think you and I have a different understanding of the term 'problem.'

Is blasphemy!
Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2012, 09:57:01 PM »

I just read his The Man Who Was Thursday recently and it was fantastic. I haven't read his apologetics in a longtime, but I have such an enormous respect for him and his integrity.

My "worldview" has changed alot since I made this thread, so I'll have to go back and see if there are things I used to agree with, I now disagree about.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Shiny
Site Supporter
Moderated
Toumarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Groucho Marxist
Jurisdiction: Dahntahn Stoop Haus
Posts: 13,267


Paint It Red


« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2012, 10:09:17 PM »

I read also author and minister George Macdonald was a big influence on both Chesterton and Lewis.
Surprisingly, George MacDonald's theology is very similar to the Orthodox who indirectly learned from the Church Fathers, he rejected penal substitutionary atonement.
Logged

“There is your brother, naked, crying, and you stand there confused over the choice of an attractive floor covering.”

– St. Ambrose of Milan
Nicene
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek
Posts: 615


« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2012, 10:55:26 PM »

I've only ever read his book orthodoxy which I love.
Logged

Thank you.
JamesR
Virginal Chicano Blood
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox (but doubtful)
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Church *of* America
Posts: 5,857


St. Augustine of Hippo pray for me!


« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2012, 01:31:06 AM »

I've always admired his humorous way of humbling people, especially those of the atheist demograph who try to employ rhetoric at every point and mock the religious. Chesterton had a way of turning your rhetoric around and striking you back ten times harder in often humorous one liners.
Logged

Quote
You're really on to something here. Tattoo to keep you from masturbating, chew to keep you from fornicating... it's a whole new world where you outsource your crosses. You're like a Christian entrepreneur or something.
Quote
James, you have problemz.
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,432



« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2012, 11:14:03 AM »

I just read his The Man Who Was Thursday recently and it was fantastic. I haven't read his apologetics in a longtime, but I have such an enormous respect for him and his integrity.

My "worldview" has changed alot since I made this thread, so I'll have to go back and see if there are things I used to agree with, I now disagree about.

I enjoy "The Man Who Was Thursday" too.  I should re-read it soon.
Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,440



WWW
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2012, 11:33:18 AM »

"The Flying Inn" is a lot of fun. Such a silly premise, though- England overtaken by Islam to such an extent that alcohol is no longer allowed.

I mean, that could never happen, amiright?
Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Online Online

Posts: 30,165


Hello for now, my friend


« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2013, 07:13:26 AM »

Among 20th century authors he is the greatest defender of the Christian faith, and though he converted from (old) Anglicanism to Catholicism later in his life, it can be said fairly truly that outside of his remarks on the Papacy and specific post-schism saints, anywhere he says 'Catholic' you can confidently insert 'Orthodox'.

I've long thought about doing a comparison of his beliefs and Orthodoxy. Though I think his collected works goes to something like 37 volumes... eek. Maybe I could just start with the better known ones (Orthodoxy, Heretics, etc.)!
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 07:26:00 AM by Asteriktos » Logged

Paradosis ≠ Asteriktos ≠ Justin

Hey, so I'm in a pop-alt-punk-folk-prog band called "Affable Dregs" and we have a new album coming out, titled "Vicious Turnips Always Taste Most Delicious." We'd really appreciate your support!
Gebre Menfes Kidus
"SERVANT of The HOLY SPIRIT"
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Ethiopian Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Tewahedo / Non-Chalcedonian
Posts: 8,390


"Lord Have Mercy on Me a Sinner!"


WWW
« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2013, 07:24:42 AM »

Great thread about an amazing man! His friend and ideological opponent, George Bernard Shaw, gets all the love from the left, but Chesterton far surpassed him as a thinker and as a writer.



Selam
Logged

"Don't register. Don't vote.
Don't enlist. Don't deploy.
Don't take oaths. Don't say the pledge.
Pray to God, and start a revolution instead!"
Selam, +GMK+
Arachne
Trinary Unit || Resident Bossy Boots
Section Moderator
Protokentarchos
*****
Online Online

Faith: Greek Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland
Posts: 4,650


November is short. Type fast.


« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2013, 07:41:26 AM »

I haven't read any of his nonfiction (though that's going to change, with the link above), but Father Brown is very high up in my list of favourite sleuths. Grin
Logged

'When you live your path all the time, you end up with both more path and more time.'~Venecia Rauls

Blog ~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.117 seconds with 60 queries.