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Author Topic: Pro-Life Women Forcibly Dragged From John Kerry Abortion Rally  (Read 9044 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 29, 2004, 11:57:55 AM »

http://www.lifenews.com/nat485.html

Pro-Life Women Forcibly Dragged From John Kerry Abortion Rally

by Steven Ertelt
LifeNews.com Editor
April 27, 2004

Washington, DC (LifeNews.com) -- Five pro-life college students were forcibly removed from a pro-abortion rally held by presumptive Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry on Friday. The students were literally dragged off after they began leading a pro-life chant and one woman suffered injuries to her feet as a result.

With leaders of NARAL and Planned Parenthood at his side, Kerry held a rally on Friday to tout his pro-abortion position and Planned Parenthood's endorsement prior to Sunday's march for abortion.

Supporters began chanting "What do we want? Choice! When do we want it? Now!"

The next time through the chant, the students, all women from George Washington University, screamed out "Life!"

Suanne Edmiston, a sophomore at George Washington University, was one of the pro-life students who attended. "We didn't plan on shouting them down," she told LifeNews.com in an exclusive interview.

According to Edmiston, after the chants, a group of young adults with NARAL t-shirts surrounded the women.

"All of a sudden these NARAL girls appeared out of nowhere," Edmiston. "You guys have to leave right now," the NARAL women told the students.

Edmiston said the students told the abortion advocates they would leave, but wanted a uniformed official to explain why they had to leave a public event and one for which they had obtained tickets from the Kerry campaign.

After seeing the students wouldn't leave, the NARAL women told each other to link arms and began to surround the pro-life students.

At the same time, older rally participants were screaming to leave the students alone. Edmiston told LifeNews.com that the older women told the younger abortion activists they could possibly hurt the students and that the students had a right to attend the rally.

But that didn't stop the young NARAL backers.

They became angry and began to push and shove the pro-life women. One woman told Suanne that her mother should have aborted her.

The NARAL women eventually enveloped three of the students, including Suanne, in a circle and began dragging them away.

Suanne was wearing flip-flops and one of her shoes fell off as she was taken away.

"My foot is dragging on the gravel and they wouldn't let me get it," Edmiston said.

The abortion advocates dragged her barefoot over a rough gravel surface that caused her foot to bleed so much that Edmiston required medical attention afterwards.

"I have never been manhandled like that before -- pushed around, shoved and tossed -- it was ridiculous," Edmiston said. "I really felt violated, they had no right to touch me like that. So much for 'my body, my choice.'"

Both Edmiston and Stan Dai, a GWU political science major and a friend of the women, said Priscilla, another pro-life student, was dragged by the strap of a backpack. The strap began to wrap itself around her neck and she began to choke.

Edmiston told LifeNews.com that neither Kerry campaign staff nor security officials stepped in to stop the activists from dragging the students away from the rally.

"Nobody stopped it, people from [Kerry's] campaign were just standing around," she said.

After receiving medial assistance from a policeman located outside the audience, Edmiston and her friends filed a report with the Washington police.

However, without the names of the abortion advocates who accosted them, there is nothing the police can do, she told LifeNews.com.

Neither Edmiston nor her friends know the women who assaulted them and it would be up to NARAL or Planned Parenthood, the rally sponsors, to volunteer the names to police, Edmiston said.

Representatives of NARAL, Planned Parenthood, and the Kerry campaign did not return requests for comment.

This is the second time pro-life people have been victimized at a Kerry campaign rally.

At a Kerry event in Tampa, Florida in March, Kerry campaign staffers destroyed the signs of two pro-life women.

In an exclusive LifeNews.com story, Rebecca Porter told LifeNews.com that she and a friend brought signs saying "My abortion hurt me" to the rally. After Kerry saw the signs, campaign staff stepped in moment later and tore them to shreds.

Porter said Kerry was "shocked and surprised" to read the sign.

The Kerry campaign has refused to comment on the matter.

"It was so disheartening," Edmiston said about the incident at the Kerry abortion rally Friday and the attitude of the abortion activists. "They didn't respect us, they had their agenda and that was it."

(Pictures of Suzanne courtesy of GWU student Rachel Jurado. Picture 1: Suanne's bloodied foot after being dragged. Picture 2: Police attend to her foot. Kerry abortion rally picture courtesy of Planned Parenthood.)


 


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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2004, 12:28:48 PM »

How can Kerry claim he is "personally against abortion" and yet act the way he does and say the things he says?

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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2004, 01:39:46 PM »

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One woman told Suanne that her mother should have aborted her.

This perfectly demonstrates the mentality of many (I don't say all) who are pro-choice, when they feel truth confronting them. When some of the people at my church were at a pro-life rally in Washington a few years ago, some pro-choicers made a demonstration against them... by exposing their chests. This type of behavior is saddening, but not uncommon. Sad
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2004, 01:48:29 PM »

I'm far from proabortion but objectively this isn't surprising. The demonstrators disrupted somebody else's meeting - of course the people holding the meeting were angry! The protesters look like martyrs to their friends but the larger world just sees them as rude. Politically naive - a mistake. Such isn't going to convert anybody to prolife.

Quote
How can Kerry claim he is "personally against abortion" and yet act the way he does and say the things he says?

Because he wants as many votes as he can get - both the ethnic, working-class RCs who may be prolife but always, always vote Democratic and the mainstream voters who are proabortion.
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2004, 04:52:10 PM »

Quote
This perfectly demonstrates the mentality of many (I don't say all) who are pro-choice, when they feel truth confronting them. When some of the people at my church were at a pro-life rally in Washington a few years ago, some pro-choicers made a demonstration against them... by exposing their chests. This type of behavior is saddening, but not uncommon.  

I wonder if the women who were dragged away were given a "CHOICE".... Lips Sealed Lips Sealed  Some how I don't think so. Also, don't these brown shirt liberals beleive in free speech???
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« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2004, 05:04:39 PM »

I think the people involved should look into civil action against the Kerry campaign.  They might have a case against event security.
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« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2004, 08:54:02 PM »

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Serge: Because he wants as many votes as he can get - both the ethnic, working-class RCs who may be prolife but always, always vote Democratic and the mainstream voters who are proabortion.

I understand that.

My point is that he is a liar.
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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2004, 09:05:02 PM »

 Shocked Angry :'(
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« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2004, 10:13:05 PM »

Someone who says they are "personally against abortion" who still think abortion should be legal and they're not "liars."  They genuinely are "personally against abortion," meaning they'd never have one themselves.  Certainly they're inconsistent, but not all of them are liars.  

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« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2004, 12:46:43 AM »

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Someone who says they are "personally against abortion" who still think abortion should be legal and they're not "liars."  They genuinely are "personally against abortion," meaning they'd never have one themselves.  Certainly they're inconsistent, but not all of them are liars.

Actually, it means John Kerry doesn't have enough "character" to stand for what he really beleives. It's just another flip flop, which Kerry seems to be a pro at. He should take some lessons from Bill Clinton, who was smooth & slick enough to get away with most of his lies. The good thing about Bush is that you know he will stand by his decisions such as the war. Bush has enough character to stand by his decisions even at the expense of costing him the election.  He'll also stand by his decisions to limit abortion as much as he can do during his tenure, even when those on the left demonize him & call  all kinds of names that I couldn't  say on this board & the media constantly attacking him for his strong stance on these important issues. I call that a real leader.

As I have said before, John, Nancy, Tom, Ted & the rest of the immoral Catholic Democrats can't have it both ways. You can't have both the innocent blood of children & the blood of christ in the eucharist. It's an oxymoron & makes no sense. They have a choice: the blood of christ or the blood of the innocent that they are responsible for.
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« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2004, 01:43:38 AM »

The good thing about Bush is that you know he will stand by his decisions such as the war. Bush has enough character to stand by his decisions even at the expense of costing him the election.  He'll also stand by his decisions to limit abortion as much as he can do during his tenure, even when those on the left demonize him & call  all kinds of names that I couldn't  say on this board & the media constantly attacking him for his strong stance on these important issues. I call that a real leader.

Yeah, even if it's a stupid decision he'll keep "standing by it" just to show how much "character" he has.  I think it was Keble that wrote about this kind of immature need for 'purity' in politicians.  

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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2004, 02:14:16 AM »

I feel compelled to mention something about a bowl of petunias....
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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2004, 08:21:42 AM »

I think that it is possible to be a religious person but to believe that the state should be secular, particularly in a country as diverse as the United States.  That does not compromise one's religious faith, it just means that one's religious faith and practice is separate from the secular state.  For Catholic politicians like Kerry and Pelosi, isn't it possible for them to believe that the state should be secular, and shouldn't base its decisions on this or that on the moral teachings of any particular religion?  The U.S. state has secular values, and it must have secular values in order for it to function properly as a secular state for a diverse nation like the U.S.  It is problematic when we expect our politicians in a secular state to express their own religious values in the context of that state.  Here I think that Arinze has gone one step too far in asking politicians to do this ... but then again one can not expect the Vatican to be supportive of the concept of a secular state to begin with.

I also fail to see at all the c omparison Nacho has made here relating to the blood of the unborn murdered and the blood of the Eucharist.  WADR, it has not been shown that Pelosi or Kerry have ever personally been involved in any abortion.  If that is not the case, they do not have "blood on their hands" for simply expressing a point of view ... that is simply lunacy.

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« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2004, 09:31:15 AM »

Yeah, even if it's a stupid decision he'll keep "standing by it" just to show how much "character" he has.  I think it was Keble that wrote about this kind of immature need for 'purity' in politicians.  



It's good that his decision to invade Iraq was not a stupid decision.  Cool
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« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2004, 09:37:06 AM »

Brendan,

I think secularism is a dry philosophy that is eating away at our society.  How can we separate our faith from our statecraft--secularism is an ideology just like religion, it's not the absence of religion (just like atheism is a belief system just like any religion, it's not possible to not have a belief system!)--and as such, to support it is to deny your religion.

I'm not saying that politicians shouldn't compromise on certain issues due to the fact that the sovereignty is based on a diverse people in this country.  However, to suggest that one can have their religious cap on in private life and their secular cap on in public life just seems unsatisfactory.  That's one of the reasons I like Bush so much--he doesn't make it a secret where his beliefs come from.  Secularism is just an umbrella for mostly-liberal but sometimes conservative ideologies that cut away at humanity's bonds.  Only faith in Christ can unite people and society.

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« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2004, 09:49:39 AM »

Quote
Also, don't these brown shirt liberals beleive in free speech???

Let me ask you this:  if a pro-abortion person turned up at a Bush rally with a sign that said something like, "Keep Abortion Legal" (of whatever that popular sign says), would you even bat an eye about the Bush security team doing the same thing?

Free speech works both ways, and, frankly, those women should have expected to be proverbially tarred and feathered.  

Look at it this way: it made the news and got their point across.  That's the fruit of free speech more than anything else.
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« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2004, 10:04:25 AM »

That's one of the reasons I like Bush so much--he doesn't make it a secret where his beliefs come from.  

But the root of secularism is protestantism.  His beliefs are just as damaging and as ultimately secular as Pelosi's and Kerry's.  Was it Hawthorne who said that the father of unitarianism was puritanism?  

It's secular in that it rejects the rightful authority of the Church.  It's just as much "do what you feel" as anything in the ECUSA.  

Protestant fundamentalism is just another trend the western world is going through.  And a trend is inherently secular because it's "here and now" and not the past.  

He's pro-life but why is he pro-life?  He's not pro-life for the same reason we're pro-life.  Because he's a part of a 'trend' and a secular religion, his opinons are shaped by 'conformity.'  We're pro-life because we're against the culture of death.  The Church gives us a proper foundation for understanding life and death.  Fundamentalists are against abortion because abortion challenges their status quo.  That's why it's possible to be catholic feminist and be pro-life but it's not possible to be a fundamentalist feminist.  

Because fundamentalism claims to be something it's not it's a bigger lie than 'liberal' protestantism.  

And let's never forget that ultimately it crushes the human spirit because it doesn't understand human nature and it's really about conformity.  
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« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2004, 10:11:12 AM »

So Bush is a Protestant.

He's Pro-Life for reasons you think aren't good enough.

Who's the alternative?

A bogus Catholic who wants to slide into the Oval Office on the blood and entrails of infants.

Sorry, but in this case I'll take the damned heretic.

BTW, Kerry is a liar.

One cannot be "personally against abortion" and do and say the things he does.

That is more than merely being "inconsistent."
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« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2004, 10:32:24 AM »

It's not that his reason isn't "good enough" but rather that's it based on flawed theology.  Because the theology is flawed, it will lead to perversions.  

BTW, Bush is a liar.
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« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2004, 10:39:27 AM »

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Jennifer:
It's not that his reason isn't "good enough" but rather that's it based on flawed theology.  Because the theology is flawed, it will lead to perversions.

Okay, so we won't recommend Bush for Patriarch of Constantinople.

If his "flawed theology" leads to the saving of the lives of millions of unborn babies, then God bless him.

Quote
Jennifer: BTW, Bush is a liar.  

I disagree.

The fact that Kerry is an open liar is beyond dispute.



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« Reply #20 on: April 30, 2004, 10:44:49 AM »

Anastasios --

I do not think it is practical for the US government to be anything other than secular.  Yes, it belies a misunderstanding of the relationship between church and state, but we must remember that this is *not* a Catholic or Orthodox country by any stretch of the imagination.  At best, it is a Protestant one, and in that context I am very much in favor of a government that is secular over one that is religiously influenced by Protestant values, such as the current administration.  If we let religion into politics too much in this country it will be of the Protestant variety, and I consider this variety of religion to be at odds with what is actually "Christianity", and as a result to be dangerous and misguided.

I guess that is really what is underlying much of the debate in this and other threads:  whether, as a Catholic/Orthodox person, you believe it is preferable to have (1) a so-called "Christian" protestant fundamentalist influenced regime or (2) a secular regime that is unattached to any particular religion.  It comes down, in some respects, to what one thinks about Protestant fundamentalism in the current context.  I would prefer to be governed by secularists than by Protestant fundamentalists any day of the week.

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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2004, 10:48:50 AM »

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I would prefer to be governed by secularists than by Protestant fundamentalists any day of the week.

If we could poll the unborn, how would they respond, I wonder.

My wife knows a lot about being governed by secularists.

Her grandfather was imprisoned by one of them: a Georgian with a big moustache.

Even in the '70s her mother and father would mention that Georgian's name only in whispers.
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« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2004, 10:49:05 AM »

"I disagree."

Well, at a minimum he misled all of us about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.  What the administration did in terms of the spin it put on the US public and the international community in early 2003 relating to WMDs in Iraq was tantamount to lying.

I recommend Woodward's new book "Plan of Attack", I have read it and it is very insightful.  Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld were planning to attack Iraq before 9/11.  Bush has been obsessed with Iraq since he became President.  We were rolled in early 2003 that this was a war to protect the US from Saddam Hussein's WMDs, when in fact it was a war of choice driven by the personal obsessions of the President and several of his advisers relating to Iraq that existed before 9/11.

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« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2004, 10:51:20 AM »

Linus --

Okay, so now all secular regimes are tantamount to Stalinism??  There is a difference between a secular state and a militant atheist one.



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« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2004, 10:56:15 AM »

Linus --

Okay, so now all secular regimes are tantamount to Stalinism??  There is a difference between a secular state and a militant atheist one.



Brendan

Yes, and there is a difference between a government of politicians who happen to be Protestant and Calvin's Geneva.

So Bush is a Protestant.

At least he isn't Kerry.
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« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2004, 10:59:48 AM »

It's a sad state of affairs when we don't vote for people, but vote against.

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« Reply #26 on: April 30, 2004, 11:00:14 AM »

So Kerry is a bad Catholic.  

At least he isn't a fundamentalist Protestant.
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« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2004, 11:01:30 AM »

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Brendan 03:Well, at a minimum he misled all of us about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.  What the administration did in terms of the spin it put on the US public and the international community in early 2003 relating to WMDs in Iraq was tantamount to lying.

Bush believed that Saddam had WsMD. That is what the intelligence community led him to believe, and the UN inspectors believed it, too, up until very recently.

What he said about WsMD he said in good faith.

If what you believe about WsMD leads you to vote for a Pro-Abortion candidate (Kerry), your conscience is your own.

I think the removal of Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq was a good thing in and of itself.
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« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2004, 11:04:31 AM »

So Kerry is a bad Catholic.  

At least he isn't a fundamentalist Protestant.  

He isn't just a guy who hasn't been to confession in a few months.

He is a promoter of the killing of millions of unborn babies.

That is more than merely being "a bad Catholic."

I don't like fundamentalist Protestantism either, but better a fundamentalist Protestant on the side of life than a hypocrite Catholic who panders to the disciples of death.
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« Reply #29 on: April 30, 2004, 11:04:50 AM »

But was he reckless in believing the intelligence community?
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« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2004, 11:05:47 AM »

It's a sad state of affairs when we don't vote for people, but vote against.



You're right, but, sadly, sometimes it comes to that.
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« Reply #31 on: April 30, 2004, 11:06:23 AM »

I'm agreeing with Linus on this one.  

And Bush is far from a "fundamentalist" Protestant.  He's a very mainstream Protestant.

Jack Chick is a "fundamentalist" Protestant.  Rev. Phelps is a "fundamentalist" Protestant.

Those guys give Christians of any stripe a bad name.
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« Reply #32 on: April 30, 2004, 11:07:27 AM »

But was he reckless in believing the intelligence community?  

How could he be?

Upon whom was he supposed to rely?

Should he have gone up in a U-2 himself?
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« Reply #33 on: April 30, 2004, 11:11:53 AM »

"What he said about WsMD he said in good faith."

"I think the removal of Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq was a good thing in and of itself."

I think if you read Woodward's book, you'll see that this WMD business was the tail of the dog when it comes to the administration's plan to "deal with" Iraq.  I do not think he was acting in good faith, I think he was seeking a pretext to sell the attack that he longed for, and it turned out that the pretext was sand.  I can't support someone who dragged our country into a war of choice based on false pretenses, placing American lives at risk for no good reason.  Attacking another country simply to remove the government is not acceptable.  I personally can't reward the administration for doing that.

I don't support Kerry either.  That's why I'll most likely abstain from this year's election.

Brendan
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« Reply #34 on: April 30, 2004, 11:14:59 AM »

"How could he be?

Upon whom was he supposed to rely?"

Then Tenet should be fired for goodness sake.  What the heck is going on in Langley these days?  First 9/11 and then this non-existent WMDs in Iraq leading to a war on false pretenses?  It's Bush's responsibility to fix the CIA, he is the President.  And when the CIA failed in the time leading up to 9/11, Bush should have fixed it, but he didn't and so we got more bad intelligence that led to the war in Iraq.  And he STILL hasn't fixed it.  Any rational government would have ditched Tenet a while ago.

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« Reply #35 on: April 30, 2004, 11:18:30 AM »

Bush isn't a liar:

http://www.insightmag.com/news/2004/05/11/World/Investigative.Reportsaddams.Wmd.Have.Been.Found-670120.shtml

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« Reply #36 on: April 30, 2004, 11:27:54 AM »

That's hardly a reliable source.  It's akin to Pravda for the right wing.
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« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2004, 11:34:40 AM »

Then how is it wrong? And if Saddam never had WMDs, then why did he refuse to allow the weapons inspectors into Iraq? Do tell.
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« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2004, 11:39:17 AM »

I feel compelled to mention something about a bowl of petunias....

Good call David Grin
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« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2004, 11:49:03 AM »

Frobie --

If we really had found WMDs you can bet your life that the current administration would be spamming the media with that information ... I think that their reticence in this regard is more telling than what is printed in a right-wing magazine.

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« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2004, 11:51:07 AM »

Whether one believes in this war or not there are too many pronouncements by both Democrats, Republicans & the U.N. prior to 9/11 that gave evidence that WMD did in fact exist in Iraq.  Otherwise, what would be the point in having inspectors (who by the way were kicked out of Iraq on atleast two occassions) go into these cities in search of these illusive weapons.  We do know that the Saddam government used nerve agents on the Kurds which resulted in as many as 5,000 deaths, and that he also tried using chemical weapons on the Iranians during the Iranian/Iraqi war.  So, where did they go.  IMHO, they were shipped out of Iraq to Syria during the 10 week period prior to the start of the war that we are now engaged in.  No one doubted their existence prior to the war and even Kerry, Kennedy, Schumer to name a few are on record of having believed this. Now, no one wants to get his or her hands dirty by supporting what is going on now.  France, Germany and Russian had some sweet deals going with Saddam which is why they are so adamately opposed to our actions.  If we had left this up to the U.N. I think we all have to be honest and say that nothing really would have happened to Saddam or his regime.  Remember our actions came after and not before 9/11.  Quite recently the arrest of terrorists who were planning on using bombs to kill upwards of 20,000 in Jordan resulted in evidence that these agents were shipped in from Syria.  IMHO, these agents are from the stocks of WMD's now hidden in the Baka<<sp?>>valley just across the Iraqi border.

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"How could he be?

Upon whom was he supposed to rely?"

Then Tenet should be fired for goodness sake.  What the heck is going on in Langley these days?  First 9/11 and then this non-existent WMDs in Iraq leading to a war on false pretenses?  It's Bush's responsibility to fix the CIA, he is the President.  And when the CIA failed in the time leading up to 9/11, Bush should have fixed it, but he didn't and so we got more bad intelligence that led to the war in Iraq.  And he STILL hasn't fixed it.  Any rational government would have ditched Tenet a while ago.

Brendan
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« Reply #41 on: April 30, 2004, 12:05:46 PM »

"Otherwise, what would be the point in having inspectors (who by the way were kicked out of Iraq on atleast two occassions) go into these cities in search of these illusive weapons."

The point was they were *suspected* to have them.  They have never been found.

"IMHO, they were shipped out of Iraq to Syria during the 10 week period prior to the start of the war that we are now engaged in."

Well, the satellites that we have in geosynchronous orbit over Iraq would have seen that if there were any significant degree of movement.  In fact, they were looking for that in the run-up to the war.  So while it is an interesting theory, I doubt it is correct.

"If we had left this up to the U.N. I think we all have to be honest and say that nothing really would have happened to Saddam or his regime."

But why would that have been a bad thing if he didn't really have WMDs to begin with?  Again, attacking a country to simply change the government is simply NOT ON.

"Remember our actions came after and not before 9/11."

Right, but he was planning to go after Iraq well before 9/11 and probably would have if 9/11 never happened.  9/11 provided yet another convenient excuse, a backdrop for the obsession with Iraq.  We should all admit that GWB has a personal conflict of interest when it comes to Iraq, and these factors have surely influenced his thinking about Iraq.  In any case, we can all rest assured now that even if Al-Qaida was not heavily engaged in Iraq under the Saddam regime, the country is now thoroughly laced with Al-Qaida operatives, as is evidenced by the "foreign fighters" our military keeps coming across in these various confrontations over the past few months.  Looks like we just helped Osama gain access to another Middle Eastern country.  Great work there.
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« Reply #42 on: April 30, 2004, 12:20:01 PM »

Quote
Attacking another country simply to remove the government is not acceptable.

Sure it is, when that government is murdering its own people and is a threat to this country.

I wonder if the intelligence community could have done a better job for us had it not been gutted during the Clinton years.

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« Reply #43 on: April 30, 2004, 12:22:41 PM »

With this intense preoccupation with Iraq by this adminstration prior to 9/11, why did we go after the Talaban and Osama in Afghanistan so quickly, instead of just going right for Iraq and be done with it. IMHO, the two are separate.  One had the training camps for the Al Qaida and the other had (which I still believe) WMD.  I find these reasons consistent with our policies when dealing with terrorism.

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« Reply #44 on: April 30, 2004, 12:33:19 PM »

"With this intense preoccupation with Iraq by this adminstration prior to 9/11, why did we go after the Talaban and Osama in Afghanistan so quickly, instead of just going right for Iraq and be done with it."

Actually it was discussed in the days following 9/11!!  Woodward's book details the meetings that took place in the days following 9/11 and one thing they were looking at was attacking Iraq.  Eventually they decided that the time was not right, and that Afghanistan was more pressing because of the harboring of Al-Qaida there.  But even while the Afghan operation was going on, the administration asked the Pentagon to begin planning the Iraq war!  The military was floored by that, but they complied with the request, as we now know.  I tell you, Woodward's book is very insightful.

"Sure it is, when that government is murdering its own people and is a threat to this country."

No, that's really not acceptable, not to me and not to most Americans.  If he had no WMDs he was no threat to our country, and simply attacking Saddam Hussein because we don't like him is nonsense.  There are many regimes around the world that mistreat their own people ... and we are not attacking them, and we ought not.  War should be reserved only for the most serious cases of threat, and that standard was not met if Saddam had no WMD, as is now apparent.

"I wonder if the intelligence community could have done a better job for us had it not been gutted during the Clinton years."

Well, I'm no supporter of Clinton either, but Bush had from September 20001 through early 2003 to revamp the CIA to produce better intelligence before deciding to go to war with Iraq.  He didn't do that.  So, that one is on him, not on Clinton.

"I find these reasons consistent with our policies when dealing with terrorism."

Perhaps if Saddam actually had WMDs.  We haven't found anything significant there.  You speculate that they are in Syria but there is no proof of that, really.  And now we are stuck with a destablized Iraq that has foreign fighters (read: Al-Qaida) in there now, where they most likely were not before.  How has the war on terror been advanced in light of that?


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