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Author Topic: UN and Cyprus  (Read 1540 times) Average Rating: 0
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TomS
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« on: April 28, 2004, 08:32:18 AM »

BUILDING BRIDGES: After Greek Cypriots rejected a UN-brokered unification deal, the EU said it would lift sanctions and give aid to the Turkish in the north

THE GUARDIAN , NICOSIA, CYPRUS
Tuesday, Apr 27, 2004,Page 6
 
The EU is to reward Turkish Cypriots for endorsing the UN reunification plan for the island, which was thrown out by the Greek Cypriots in Saturday's referendum.

European foreign ministers meeting in Luxembourg are poised to lift the economic embargo of the Turkish Cypriots, approve a 260-million-euro aid package for the north, and allow tariff-free entry of fruit and vegetables into the EU.

"The Turkish Cypriots have taken a bold and important step and stopped saying no after 30 years. They mustn't suffer," a Brussels diplomat said.

Quote
What about the GREEK Cypriotes who had there homes and property STOLEN in the 70's???!!!


Gunter Verheugen, the EU's expansion commissioner, told German television after Saturday's vote: "What we will seriously consider now is finding a way to end the economic isolation of the Turkish Cypriots."

The yes vote from the Turkish side is likely to boost the chances that Turkey itself will get the green light to start its long-awaited EU membership talks this year.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey's reformist prime minister, moved quickly to cash in his chips, calling on the EU to acknowledge the role played by his country in changing minds in the north, occupied since the 1974 invasion.

"It is an undeniable fact that the Turkish side was the active and constructive side for a Cyprus solution," Erdogan said. "I believe the policy of isolating Turkish Cypriots will now come to an end."

Quote
EXCUSE ME? Do they remember WHY the UN was isolating them???!!! So the lesson to be learned here is just hold out long enough and the UN will come around.

The no vote will cast a long shadow over the EU's enlargement with 10 new members next weekend, since the Mediterranean island is still divided and the base of thousands of Turkish troops.

EU leaders are furious at the Greek Cypriots, with Brussels expressing "deep regret" at the outcome of the 11th-hour vote.

Chris Patten, the external affairs commissioner, on Sunday accused the Greek Cypriots of betrayal. He told the BBC: "They're not going to be a popular addition to the family."

The results showed 65 percent of Turkish Cypriots voted yes and 76 percent of the Greek community voted against the UN plan.

Patten said: "There has always been an implicit understanding that we would make Cypriot accession to the union easier and in return the Greek Cypriot community and leadership would argue the case for a decent settlement ... so I think we feel that we have, as it were, handed over the chocolate and they have refused to hand back the crisps."

An air of stunned disbelief hung over the north on Sunday.

"What is wrong with us? I don't understand, it's so stupid," said Ozgun Yoldas outside his Nicosia kebab shop.

Greek Cypriots toed the line of Tassos Papadopoulos, their leader, who termed the blueprint "unviable" and risky.

Soon after the result, the Turkish foreign minister, Abdullah Gul, ruled out possibility of a second referendum on the plan.

"With the Greek Cypriot answering no, the partition of the island has been made permanent," he said. And Turkey would not withdraw its 35,000 troops.

The international community hoped both sides would bury their ethnic differences to endorse the plan in time for Cyprus joining the EU.

The ramifications of the no vote, according to EU diplomats, could be devastating for the Greek Cypriots. The prospect of an EU border ending at the island's UN-patrolled "dead zone" has especially unnerved mandarins in Brussels.

With its sandbags, trenches and barbed wire, the 180km ceasefire line resembles more of a 1914-18 battlefield than a modern border crossing.

"There is big disappointment," said Adriaan van der Meer, who leads the EU delegation in Nicosia. "We wanted a reunited Cyprus to join the EU. We firmly believe that the UN plan is viable and the best way forward."

Quote
The UN is a pathetic organization!
« Last Edit: April 28, 2004, 08:33:22 AM by Tom+ú » Logged
prodromos
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2004, 08:55:08 AM »

Amen to that final comment!

When we see refugees, we usually see them carrying whatever of their belongings they had the strength to carry. The Greek Cypriots however, were forced out of their homes with nothing but the clothes on their backs. They were not even permitted to take a change of underwear from their homes let alone anything of value. They lost everything!

John.
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Brendan03
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2004, 10:50:09 AM »

I agree.  The New York Times had a shameful editorial about this yesterday, chastising the Greek Cypriots for "holding out".  Doesn't anyone want to remember that Turkey INVADED Cyprus??  Is the reality that if you invade and stick around long enough you can basically keep the spoils of the invasion??
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2004, 10:58:11 AM »

Amen to remark about UN being a Pathetic Organization.
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« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2004, 11:05:31 AM »

Amen to remark about UN being a Pathetic Organization.

Here, here!
But the weird thing about all this is that Cyprus will enter the EU on May 1 and without the "Turkish part" of the island. After then, the Greek Cypriotes can veto Turkey's entry into the EU. I am certain there will be more to follow about this. My Cypriote friends are very good businesspeople  Wink

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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2004, 11:53:56 AM »

Here, here!
But the weird thing about all this is that Cyprus will enter the EU on May 1 and without the "Turkish part" of the island. After then, the Greek Cypriotes can veto Turkey's entry into the EU. I am certain there will be more to follow about this. My Cypriote friends are very good businesspeople  Wink

Demetri

Well, yes, and in fact this is *why* the Greeks were so unresponsive to the proposed reunification ... because they don't need to agree to it, and will enter the EU anyway.

As far as Turkey is concerned, there are other countries that also do not want it to be a part of the EU (most notably Germany, due to fears of a massive migration from Turkey to Germany where there are already a good number of expatriate Turks living today).  It seems that the New York Times wants Turkey to be a part of the EU more than Europeans do, because the NYT has an agenda of its own for Europe (read: de-Christianize what it means to be a European).  As secular as Europe is, Europeans still do not identify with Islam being a part of "Europe" at all, despite the exceptions to that in the Balkans.  It's that concept of self-definition, together with the reality that Turkey does not really have a democratic system a la Europe, that will keep Turkey out of the EU, in my view, for some time to come.


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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2004, 02:28:25 PM »

Here, here!
But the weird thing about all this is that Cyprus will enter the EU on May 1 and without the "Turkish part" of the island. After then, the Greek Cypriotes can veto Turkey's entry into the EU. I am certain there will be more to follow about this. My Cypriote friends are very good businesspeople  Wink

Demetri

Yes, Demetri, the newspapers on this side of the pond have been full of self-righteous editorials suggesting that the EU now regrets allowing the Greek Cypriots to join the club. What I really enjoyed though was this quote from a Turkish newspaper which the British daily, the Guardian, posted in a round-up of international opinion:

Ilnur Cevik
Turkish Daily News, Turkey, April 26

"At last, the Greek Cypriots have shown their true face to the international community. They have demonstrated openly that they are not interested in living side by side with the Turkish Cypriots and simply want to dominate them in Cyprus as their masters ... Now the Greek Cypriots hope to negotiate another deal on more favourable terms and push for a new referendum

http://www.guardian.co.uk/editor/story/0,12900,1203929,00.html

Dominating people as their masters? The Turks would know nothing about that, of course.  Wink

The London Times was also wonderfully sniffy:

"Cyprus will enter the European Union in a week's time on a sour note, its presence resented by those who do not want to import the island's squabbles".

Damned ex-colonials and their squabbles! There is of course, another divided island much closer to the Times, but hey, that's another story Tongue

Brigid

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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2004, 03:12:19 PM »

Is the reality that if you invade and stick around long enough you can basically keep the spoils of the invasion??  

Unfortunately, that is the reality.  Just ask the next Cherokee, Lakota, Irishman, or Australian Aborigine you run into.  The age of imperialism isn't over, its just shifted gears.  The idea is basically: "We got what we want, now let's all be friends and leave the status quo as it is.".

Remember that Anatolia itself was not always Turkey.  Even in the aftermath of WWI, there was the possibility of justice for the Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Christians living there, but no longer.  The reality is that the Turks live there now (Anatolia and Cyprus), and nothing short of an all out war will ever remove them.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2004, 03:16:09 PM by Antonious Nikolas » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2004, 10:22:39 PM »

Remember that Anatolia itself was not always Turkey.  Even in the aftermath of WWI, there was the possibility of justice for the Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Christians living there, but no longer.  The reality is that the Turks live there now (Anatolia and Cyprus), and nothing short of an all out war will ever remove them.


Then lets go.
I have my Rusty k-bar ready.
someone lend me an AK-47
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2004, 02:28:48 AM »

The reality is that the Turks live there now (Anatolia and Cyprus), and nothing short of an all out war will ever remove them.

Anatolia's lost. There is nothing left for the Greeks. The Turks have ethnically cleansed the area and converted all of the churches which they made sure woulld be empty into fuel storage depots, mosques, and museums (as if I would ever want to see them in that environment). Anatolia only represents future Christian re-converts (LOL!).
Not so with Cyprus, yet.
Somehow I do not understand how the Turks end up heroes in Cyprus and the Serbs, protecting their country end up villians. And they wonder why we colonials over here think the EU laughable.

Hey, romanbyzantium! Why doesn't the pope send some proselytizers to Turkey instead of Russia/Ukrainia? Be a good question for the Protestant evanglizers too, I think. Try the moslem lands...

Demetri
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2004, 07:37:06 AM »

Anatolia's lost. There is nothing left for the Greeks. The Turks have ethnically cleansed the area and converted all of the churches which they made sure woulld be empty into fuel storage depots, mosques, and museums (as if I would ever want to see them in that environment). Anatolia only represents future Christian re-converts (LOL!).
Not so with Cyprus, yet.
Somehow I do not understand how the Turks end up heroes in Cyprus and the Serbs, protecting their country end up villians. And they wonder why we colonials over here think the EU laughable.

Hey, romanbyzantium! Why doesn't the pope send some proselytizers to Turkey instead of Russia/Ukrainia? Be a good question for the Protestant evanglizers too, I think. Try the moslem lands...

Demetri

Yes, actually the Turks are busily destroying (ie, plowing down) numerous Armenian churches in Eastern Turkey in order to erase all trace of the Armenian presence there, so that they can more easily perpetuate their outrageuous denial relating to the first genocide of the 20th Century, committed by the Turks against the Armenians.  William Dalrymple, in his insightful trevelogue "From The Holy Mountain" ( a highly recommended read, by the way) writes of these things that he has witnessed with his own eyes while travelling in Turkey.  Shameful, dastardly, ethnocentric genocidal maniacs who would have already taken the "Islamic party" option had the military not made it clear that this would not fly  .. haha, what a robust "democracy" they have in Turkey.  Look at what the Turks are doing *currently* to the Kurds in Southeast Turkey!  Civilized?  I think not.  Here we have Turkey committing human rights abuses left and right against the Kurds and the small remaining Christian communities in Turkey, and yet the New York Times chooses to criticize Greece.  Hypocrisy, if you ask me.

Brendan

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