Author Topic: "God bless you"  (Read 2551 times)

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Offline Russell

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"God bless you"
« on: January 01, 2011, 02:36:49 AM »
A few weeks ago I visited a nondenominational church and everyone seemed to be in the habit of saying "God bless you" instead of goodbye. 


Is it appropiate for non-clergy to say "God bless you"

 
Mathe 24:36

Offline Heorhij

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Re: "God bless you"
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2011, 02:46:12 AM »
As far as I know, according to the Orthodox tradition, it is OK for one layman to say to another, "God bless you" (even though it is not widely accepted) - but it is not approppriate for a layman to say "God bless you" to a clergyman.

In those traditions that I am familiar with (Ukrainian and Russian), Orthodox lay people say to each other "Good bye," or "Go with God," when they part, but not "God bless you."

In the Russian tradition, sometimes Orthodox lay people say "Christ save you" instead of "Thank you," but this custom is not very prevalent.
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Offline FormerReformer

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Re: "God bless you"
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2011, 03:30:11 AM »
As far as I know, according to the Orthodox tradition, it is OK for one layman to say to another, "God bless you" (even though it is not widely accepted) - but it is not approppriate for a layman to say "God bless you" to a clergyman.


And yet such a hard habit to break when it's the automatic response to pop out as a reply.  Embarrassed myself talking with a priest after Liturgy, before coffee and the mental acuity that comes with it had a chance to kick in.
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Offline WetCatechumen

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Re: "God bless you"
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2011, 06:57:04 AM »
Non-sacramental churches view "blessings" in a different way.

Of course I cross myself whenever my Protestant father tells me "God Bless You" so I choose to take it that way, at least in some contexts. To me, when a layperson says it to another layperson, it usually doesn't mean that the layperson is trying to impart a blessing onto the other person, but merely expressing a wish and a prayer to God that God's blessing will descend upon that person.

And if that is not okay for me to do for anyone, then what is? Although it would sound inappropriate to say to a priest.
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Offline Ioannis Climacus

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Re: "God bless you"
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2011, 09:09:33 AM »
I think it is worth pointing out that "goodbye" is a shortened form of "God be with you" so "God bless you" should be appropriate in any setting in which "goodbye" would be fitting.
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: "God bless you"
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2011, 09:39:09 AM »
Even if the "bless" word isn't used, God is regularly invoked by Orthodox laypeople in conversation. Russian spasibo "thank you" is a contraction of spasi Bog "may God save [you]", while Romanian believers greet each other with Doamne ajută "May the Lord help [you]".