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Poll
Question: How much time do you pray each weekday?
0-10 minutes - 8 (25%)
11-30 minutes - 13 (40.6%)
31-60 minutes - 3 (9.4%)
1 h - 2h - 4 (12.5%)
2h+ - 4 (12.5%)
Total Voters: 32

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synLeszka
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« on: November 26, 2010, 02:17:00 PM »

Answer the question above.
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2010, 02:56:31 PM »

Not enough  Cry
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2010, 04:10:03 PM »

Not enough  Cry

ditto. 
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2010, 04:16:56 PM »

Not enough  Cry
Amen!
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2010, 04:20:49 PM »

I voted for 30-60 minutes. My problem is that that I have praying this much for about two weeks now.
There were times when I barely prayed 5 minutes a day.
The Psalms are great because when you see injustice, malbehaviour you want justice, you want to defend yourself but you forget that you are a Christian and that everything is in God's hands. I encourage everyone to pray the Psalms. But walking home, anywhere, you should practice prayers which include repetition.

I have heard that cardinal Newman said that if you spend at least 5 minutes on reflection about the Holy Spirit, than everything will fall into place. I seem to ask the Holy Spirit, what should I accomplish to fulfill the Divine Will.
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2010, 05:41:26 PM »

I voted for 30-60 minutes. My problem is that that I have praying this much for about two weeks now.
There were times when I barely prayed 5 minutes a day.
The Psalms are great because when you see injustice, malbehaviour you want justice, you want to defend yourself but you forget that you are a Christian and that everything is in God's hands. I encourage everyone to pray the Psalms. But walking home, anywhere, you should practice prayers which include repetition.

I have heard that cardinal Newman said that if you spend at least 5 minutes on reflection about the Holy Spirit, than everything will fall into place. I seem to ask the Holy Spirit, what should I accomplish to fulfill the Divine Will.

I know that you are not Orthodox, but I have to say this bit I bolded is one of the reasons I am interested in Orthodoxy. It seems to me that pretty most everywhere else the Holy Spirit doesn't get appreciated in terms of (which personal pronoun do I use?) personhood.

There seems to be an implication in many denominations that the Holy Spirit is merely some act or aspect of the Father or Jesus Christ that the Holy Spirit truly is not a singular person of the Godhead.

Enjoyed your comment.

FWIW.
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2010, 06:18:18 PM »

Just my 2 cents, but I can't count how many minutes! In formal prayer, there are the readings the morning and evening prayers. We could time ourselves, but what about waking in the middle of the night and reciting the Jesus Prayer or others until falling back to sleep? What about throughout the day, before meals, before driving, before and after an important or not-so- important task? I'm an iconographer, a student, and the hours spent on that task is one constant prayer. Still, like the posts already made, it is not nearly enough!
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2010, 04:21:31 PM »

I voted for 11-30.  I try to take my time in the evening, comprehending each prayer, which takes about 15 minutes.  in the mornings, I have to rush, and I use a little prayer book, which takes me about 2-5 minutes.  so, on an average weekday, I pray about 16-18 minutes.

I agree with the others, not enough by far.   Cry    I have trouble remembering to pray before eating lunch (even just making the sign of the cross.)
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2010, 04:25:23 PM »

Not as much as I should...I am starting to believe that our lives should be a prayer..

"Keep praying..keep praying.. always keep praying and if you have to...use words"
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2010, 04:28:18 PM »

I know that you are not Orthodox, but I have to say this bit I bolded is one of the reasons I am interested in Orthodoxy. It seems to me that pretty most everywhere else the Holy Spirit doesn't get appreciated in terms of (which personal pronoun do I use?) personhood.

There seems to be an implication in many denominations that the Holy Spirit is merely some act or aspect of the Father or Jesus Christ that the Holy Spirit truly is not a singular person of the Godhead.

I take it you've never been around the Pentecostals. They're a modern sort of backlash against that.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 04:28:53 PM by Alveus Lacuna » Logged
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2010, 06:23:39 PM »

I voted for 30-60 minutes. My problem is that that I have praying this much for about two weeks now.
There were times when I barely prayed 5 minutes a day.
The Psalms are great because when you see injustice, malbehaviour you want justice, you want to defend yourself but you forget that you are a Christian and that everything is in God's hands. I encourage everyone to pray the Psalms. But walking home, anywhere, you should practice prayers which include repetition.

I have heard that cardinal Newman said that if you spend at least 5 minutes on reflection about the Holy Spirit, than everything will fall into place. I seem to ask the Holy Spirit, what should I accomplish to fulfill the Divine Will.

May I make a suggestion? I find it helpful to set a goal for myself that I can meet under all conditions. Then, if I want to exceed that amount, I can. If I set too ambitious a goal, I set myself up for failure. One of the surest ways to undermine a regular spiritual practice is to bite off too big a piece in the beginning. Very few people start out praying without ceasing.

If you were to say the Trisagion, Psalm 50, and a prayer to the Theotokos, that could be a bare minimum. Then, you could add more Psalms; prayers for family and church; daily Scripture reading--whatever. My own experience over time is that I am hungry for prayer and will naturally gravitate toward it. But if it becomes something to struggle against and fail...it becomes a chore I tend to resist, rather than a treasure I want to rush to.
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« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2010, 08:27:04 PM »

Have you ever noticed that when you first begin you may rush a little, as if you are just "fitting it in". However by the time you reach the last page you realize you're surprised it's over already and hate to stop!
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« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2010, 08:48:59 PM »

Have you ever noticed that when you first begin you may rush a little, as if you are just "fitting it in". However by the time you reach the last page you realize you're surprised it's over already and hate to stop!
Sometimes I start with a series of prostrations. That slows me down so I can focus more. Some of our commonest prayers have such deep meaning that keeps opening up more and more if I repeat them.
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« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2010, 09:14:52 PM »

Have you ever noticed that when you first begin you may rush a little, as if you are just "fitting it in". However by the time you reach the last page you realize you're surprised it's over already and hate to stop!

I find that with longer prayer sessions in church or at home, that it usually really takes me about 30 minutes of reading prayers until my will starts to get beaten down into submission, and especially if I have been fasting that day then finally as I read my spirit begins to "soar" or something like that. It's like as I pray all of the irritations, pains in the legs and back and wanting to sit down, wanting a drink, thinking about other things, wanting for prayer to be over so I can do other things, etc. all seem to fade away after a while. It's almost as if the demons are harassing me, but if I stick to it long enough then they just give up and go somewhere else.

That being said, if I overeat or even really eat anything before prayer it is a huge hindrance to me. But since it really takes me about a half an hour to get into the groove of things, that unfortunately means that most times my morning and evening prayers are filled with the distractions mentioned above.
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« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2010, 09:23:13 PM »

Have you ever noticed that when you first begin you may rush a little, as if you are just "fitting it in". However by the time you reach the last page you realize you're surprised it's over already and hate to stop!

I find that with longer prayer sessions in church or at home, that it usually really takes me about 30 minutes of reading prayers until my will starts to get beaten down into submission, and especially if I have been fasting that day then finally as I read my spirit begins to "soar" or something like that. It's like as I pray all of the irritations, pains in the legs and back and wanting to sit down, wanting a drink, thinking about other things, wanting for prayer to be over so I can do other things, etc. all seem to fade away after a while. It's almost as if the demons are harassing me, but if I stick to it long enough then they just give up and go somewhere else.

That being said, if I overeat or even really eat anything before prayer it is a huge hindrance to me. But since it really takes me about a half an hour to get into the groove of things, that unfortunately means that most times my morning and evening prayers are filled with the distractions mentioned above.
Our physiologies seem to have the same kind of rhythm. I'm just starting to feel unbound after the second Kathisma. The only way I've found for dealing with this is to get up earlier, unfortunately. The demons don't give up in my case, they just go over and sit down in the corner till I'm done. LOL I can hear them playing cards or watching TV ... Rarely do I succeed in defeating them permanently, but I can often succeed in boring them into a temporary cessation of hostilities.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 09:28:47 PM by Hermogenes » Logged
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« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2010, 10:24:36 PM »

Never enough!
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« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2010, 10:29:03 PM »

Have you ever noticed that when you first begin you may rush a little, as if you are just "fitting it in". However by the time you reach the last page you realize you're surprised it's over already and hate to stop!

Yes, I see that too.   Smiley
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« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2010, 10:29:48 PM »

I can hear them playing cards or watching TV ... Rarely do I succeed in defeating them permanently, but I can often succeed in boring them into a temporary cessation of hostilities.

That's hilarious!  Cheesy I'd have to say this is a more apt description of what really happens. I suppose they don't really "go away", they just stop pestering me for a while once they figure out that, damn it, I'm just going to keep on reading until it's over even if I don't pay attention to anything I say. Then they get bored and pull out the cards, and then I finally start paying attention to what I'm reading, and maybe even begin to pray with a bit of conviction or compunction!
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« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2010, 06:50:11 PM »

Less time than I spend online which is totally backwards.  Undecided
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« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2010, 10:41:40 PM »

Less time than I spend online which is totally backwards.  Undecided

Same here.  Sad I sure do need to adjust my priorities.
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« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2010, 10:54:45 PM »

Progressively less and less. Sad

When I was a catechumen, and when I was just received into the Church, I read all the prayers from my prayerbook every morning and every evening. But then, at some point, I noticed that that was just a mechanical thing; I was not really moved by these historical prayers of St. Basil of St. Makarios or St. Ephraim etc. Well, sometimes I was, but not on a daily basis. On the other hand, I just never, ever was able to pay spontaneously, in my own words. I do not even know why - maybe it's my anti-theist, Theomachian upbringing in the former USSR. So, I began to shorten my time in front of the icons in my icon corner, and shorten it, and shorten it, and shorten it.

For a while, I was able to at least mumble the Trisagion. Now, I am back to square one - I just cannot pray. Every morning and evening, I come to my icon corner and silently cross myself. At best, I say, "Lord, have mercy." It only takes a few seconds, that all for me now.

Yet, if I see a prayer request on this forum or on Facebook, I always cross myself and ask God to have mercy on the person for whom the prayers were requested.
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« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2010, 07:07:43 AM »

Perhaps it would be a good idea to pray for the heart to be able to pray...?
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« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2010, 07:17:35 AM »

Perhaps it would be a good idea to pray for the heart to be able to pray...?

Now that's true.  Smiley

"Lord, teach us to pray."   angel
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« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2010, 08:52:27 AM »

Progressively less and less. Sad

When I was a catechumen, and when I was just received into the Church, I read all the prayers from my prayerbook every morning and every evening. But then, at some point, I noticed that that was just a mechanical thing; I was not really moved by these historical prayers of St. Basil of St. Makarios or St. Ephraim etc. Well, sometimes I was, but not on a daily basis. On the other hand, I just never, ever was able to pay spontaneously, in my own words. I do not even know why - maybe it's my anti-theist, Theomachian upbringing in the former USSR. So, I began to shorten my time in front of the icons in my icon corner, and shorten it, and shorten it, and shorten it.

For a while, I was able to at least mumble the Trisagion. Now, I am back to square one - I just cannot pray. Every morning and evening, I come to my icon corner and silently cross myself. At best, I say, "Lord, have mercy." It only takes a few seconds, that all for me now.

Yet, if I see a prayer request on this forum or on Facebook, I always cross myself and ask God to have mercy on the person for whom the prayers were requested.

You meet a person, start to get to know them, fall in love, and for a little while they are the most exciting person in the world. You only want to spend time with them and can't wait till you can see them again. Perhaps you get married. After time passes, you notice that excitement isn't there any more, you don't feel the sudden rush of energy when they come into a room. This is where a lot of relationships end. But if we hold on, eventually we see a deeper, quieter, more realistic, and more profound love taking their place. I think most relationships follow this kind of arc, and my relationship with God is like any other in some respects. It takes work and patience, and it takes recognition that some days are going to be dry, flat, with me feeling distant (who moved?). But even more than with a human relationship, I need to keep trying. I know what you mean about the long set prayers, and maybe you would want to try fewer of them. Speaking for myself, I always find the Psalms helpful. David was writing from a very human and personal place, and his words are words I can always relate to, whether he is telling God how lonely he is, how terrible it is to be a sinner, or how happy he is to be God's servant. But there's no reason at all why I can't just talk to God in my own words, tell Him how it's going. ("The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit; A broken and contrite heart, Oh Lord, You will not despise.")

Eventually, I have always found my way back to God. But if I wait for Him to make the first move it can sometimes take quite awhile. I really just want to say, everyone goes through these times. I hope yours ends soon and you recover some of the joy you felt in the beginning.
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« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2010, 04:23:18 PM »

And it's also nice knowing that meanwhile He's still waiting and won't leave, unlike some human relationships.
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« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2010, 05:31:26 PM »

And it's also nice knowing that meanwhile He's still waiting and won't leave, unlike some human relationships.

Always there. Always merciful.
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