Author Topic: The 'straight arrow' theologian and the pope  (Read 1003 times)

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Offline Jetavan

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The 'straight arrow' theologian and the pope
« on: November 13, 2010, 02:44:48 AM »
From NCROnline:

TÜBINGEN, GERMANY -- Hans Küng has always held to his progressive theological views. He believes that the present crisis in the church shows that he was right. The whole Roman system is in question, he maintains, though neither the Vatican nor the majority of the bishops yet realize it.
....
The two men [i.e., Küng and Pope Benedict XVI] had a “very similar” upbringing, Küng reflects. “We both came from traditional Catholic families in traditional Catholic regions. We had the same sort of schooling.” But Ratzinger “was from the beginning fixed on this tradition. When as pope he received me in his summer residence at Castel Gandolfo” -- they talked for four hours -- “he told me, ‘I have to keep the tradition.’ But by ‘the tradition’ he means the tradition he knows very well, which he thinks is the Catholic tradition.”
....
Küng recalls how French theologian Yves Congar, who played a major part at Vatican II (1962-65), would tell him, “If you want to understand the Roman Catholic church today, look at the 11th century.” There one sees the break between West and East, the rise of “Roman absolutism” and “enforced clericalism -- including the law of celibacy.” Küng thinks that Benedict is still wedded to that paradigm. “He is an antimodernist in the deepest sense of the word.”
....
After dinner with him during Vatican II, Congar wrote in his journal: “Küng goes straight ahead like an arrow. He is a demanding, revolutionary type, rather impatient.” Congar added: “We need such people.”
« Last Edit: November 13, 2010, 02:45:15 AM by Jetavan »
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Offline akimel

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Re: The 'straight arrow' theologian and the pope
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2010, 02:37:19 PM »
From NCROnline:

TÜBINGEN, GERMANY -- Hans Küng has always held to his progressive theological views. He believes that the present crisis in the church shows that he was right. The whole Roman system is in question, he maintains, though neither the Vatican nor the majority of the bishops yet realize it.

All of Christianity is of course in crisis, in one form or another.  The crises (plural) in the Catholic Church hardly prove that Kung's views are correct.  Indeed, the present disarray and decadence of mainline Protestantism, which has fully embraced Kung's views, prove that Kung's views are incapable of sustaining the evangelical gospel and catholic church life.  Yet never addresses the destruction wrought by his Scheleirmachian approach to Christianity.  Ironically, Kung did his doctoral work on Karl Barth, whose critique of liberal experientialism is profound and powerful, yet Kung ultimately embraced a methodology rejected both by Barth and Catholicism. 

Quote
The two men [i.e., Küng and Pope Benedict XVI] had a “very similar” upbringing, Küng reflects. “We both came from traditional Catholic families in traditional Catholic regions. We had the same sort of schooling.” But Ratzinger “was from the beginning fixed on this tradition. When as pope he received me in his summer residence at Castel Gandolfo” -- they talked for four hours -- “he told me, ‘I have to keep the tradition.’ But by ‘the tradition’ he means the tradition he knows very well, which he thinks is the Catholic tradition.”
....
Küng recalls how French theologian Yves Congar, who played a major part at Vatican II (1962-65), would tell him, “If you want to understand the Roman Catholic church today, look at the 11th century.” There one sees the break between West and East, the rise of “Roman absolutism” and “enforced clericalism -- including the law of celibacy.” Küng thinks that Benedict is still wedded to that paradigm. “He is an antimodernist in the deepest sense of the word.”

Ratizinger/Benedict can hardly be accurately described as an antimodernist "in the deepest sense of the word," as anyone knows who has read his books and articles.  Ratzinger was as deeply opposed to the manual dogmatism that characterized post-Tridentine Catholicism as Kung.  But Ratzinger is a man of the Sacred Tradition, constantly searching into the depths of the Tradition to discern the self-revelation of God in Christ.   The difference between the two men is that Kung has completely and uncritically swallowed modernity. 

Offline podkarpatska

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Re: The 'straight arrow' theologian and the pope
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2010, 03:35:25 PM »
From NCROnline:

TÜBINGEN, GERMANY -- Hans Küng has always held to his progressive theological views. He believes that the present crisis in the church shows that he was right. The whole Roman system is in question, he maintains, though neither the Vatican nor the majority of the bishops yet realize it.

All of Christianity is of course in crisis, in one form or another.  The crises (plural) in the Catholic Church hardly prove that Kung's views are correct.  Indeed, the present disarray and decadence of mainline Protestantism, which has fully embraced Kung's views, prove that Kung's views are incapable of sustaining the evangelical gospel and catholic church life.  Yet never addresses the destruction wrought by his Scheleirmachian approach to Christianity.  Ironically, Kung did his doctoral work on Karl Barth, whose critique of liberal experientialism is profound and powerful, yet Kung ultimately embraced a methodology rejected both by Barth and Catholicism. 

Quote
The two men [i.e., Küng and Pope Benedict XVI] had a “very similar” upbringing, Küng reflects. “We both came from traditional Catholic families in traditional Catholic regions. We had the same sort of schooling.” But Ratzinger “was from the beginning fixed on this tradition. When as pope he received me in his summer residence at Castel Gandolfo” -- they talked for four hours -- “he told me, ‘I have to keep the tradition.’ But by ‘the tradition’ he means the tradition he knows very well, which he thinks is the Catholic tradition.”
....
Küng recalls how French theologian Yves Congar, who played a major part at Vatican II (1962-65), would tell him, “If you want to understand the Roman Catholic church today, look at the 11th century.” There one sees the break between West and East, the rise of “Roman absolutism” and “enforced clericalism -- including the law of celibacy.” Küng thinks that Benedict is still wedded to that paradigm. “He is an antimodernist in the deepest sense of the word.”

Ratizinger/Benedict can hardly be accurately described as an antimodernist "in the deepest sense of the word," as anyone knows who has read his books and articles.  Ratzinger was as deeply opposed to the manual dogmatism that characterized post-Tridentine Catholicism as Kung.  But Ratzinger is a man of the Sacred Tradition, constantly searching into the depths of the Tradition to discern the self-revelation of God in Christ.   The difference between the two men is that Kung has completely and uncritically swallowed modernity. 

Well put.