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Author Topic: Activities on church days  (Read 634 times) Average Rating: 0
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biro
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« on: November 12, 2010, 11:58:00 PM »

I am aware that some occasions during the year are considered very solemn and lend themselves to things like staying home, being with your loved ones, and maybe not going out to do certain activities (parties, bowling, etc.). For instance, during Lent and Holy Week. I would like to know if it is still okay to do something very simple such as take my regular daily walk for 10-20 minutes? I wouldn't be going to the gym, just an ordinary short walk around the block for fresh air. (This would be after church; I wouldn't skip anything.) Thanks.  Smiley
« Last Edit: November 12, 2010, 11:59:10 PM by biro » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2010, 12:07:54 AM »

Come on. We are not New England Puritans.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2010, 12:22:37 AM by augustin717 » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2010, 12:38:21 AM »

 Embarrassed
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2010, 01:08:30 AM »

There's nothing wrong with the activities listed above, taking walks and so forth.

A nun once told me Sundays and feastdays are special days and should be treated as such.

What that looks like is different for each person. I know plenty of Orthodox who go to dinner and movies on Sundays, for instance, while I am personally uncomfortable with that, maybe due to my strict upbringing. Personally speaking, on Sundays and feasts (if possible) I tend to stick around the house more, and try to do things such as spiritual reading and spend time with friends and family.

The Church specifically tells us to avoid "servile work" on Sundays and feast days, and we must attend liturgy. Aside from that, we all must find our balance between violating our conscience and scrupulosity (both can be sins), and that is best accomplished at the direction of the priest and after the example of the saints.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2010, 01:11:17 AM by bogdan » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2010, 05:25:07 PM »

I am aware that some occasions during the year are considered very solemn and lend themselves to things like staying home, being with your loved ones, and maybe not going out to do certain activities (parties, bowling, etc.).

?!?!?

Quote from: Walter Sobchak
Saturday, Donny, is Shabbos, the Jewish day of rest. That means that I don't work, I don't drive a car, I don't @!#! ride in a car, I don't handle money, I don't turn on the oven, and I sure as @!@! *don't @!@!@! roll*!
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2010, 06:15:10 PM »

Quote from: orthonorm

Quote from: Walter Sobchak
Saturday, Donny, is Shabbos, the Jewish day of rest. That means that I don't work, I don't drive a car, I don't @!#! ride in a car, I don't handle money, I don't turn on the oven, and I sure as @!@! *don't @!@!@! roll*!

I don't know what you're talking about. I will explain what I meant, which I thought would be understood here. I was brought up in a Catholic home, and my parents would have me taken out of school on Good Friday. I was to stay home, and I mean stay home, between 12 noon and three PM on Good Friday, because those were the hours Our Lord was on the Cross. That was the Catholic tradition in those times, and my parents were pretty serious about observing it. When I got a little older, they expected me to go to all the Holy Week services, and I mean all of them-- morning, afternoon, evening, the Hours and the ones that go for two or three hours. I remember Mom would drop me off and go find a place to park a couple of blocks away because the place was dang near full. We stood up almost the whole time, we held candles, we sang... it was the last of the 'good days,' before they stopped caring how they ran the parishes, before a whole lot of other things that I don't have time to talk about now-- or I could, but I wasn't kidding.

What I was trying to ask in the first place, was whether the Orthodox kept the same habit of staying indoors or keeping things generally low-key on Good Friday (when you're not at church). Holy Saturday in particular is always one of the most difficult days of the year for me. I tend to get pretty depressed on that day. Yes, I know the Resurrection is the day after that, so in a sense the Lord is almost with us then, but in a way He is not (yet). Maybe you think that's funny? I don't.

I don't know, maybe I'm not cut out for this, maybe I'm not going to make it anyway. It's a good thing I know the people in my parish, because otherwise, I don't know what I'm going to do. Maybe I will just have to be 'wrong' and have to pray all the more for God to forgive me. I am sorry.
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2010, 06:56:49 PM »


biro, you are spot on!

YES, Orthodoxy teaches all the same things you mentioned above.

All of Great Lent is spent in contemplative solitude.  One does not go to parties, bowling, etc.
Holy Week is especially restricted...by choice and out of respect for the Lord.  The fast is the strictest that last week.
Holy Friday is to be very solemn and quiet.  Yes, we know the Resurrection is just around the corner....and yet, are we prepared?  These are our last days to prepare...so we pray more, read more, etc. 
Holy Saturday...Liturgy in the morning...and afterwards, as a female, my day is mostly spent in the kitchen...cooking and baking for the Paschal Feast.  However, no TV's are on, no radios, no music, etc.  I would even say that the birds are a bit hushed that day.  Next year, listen...compare it to the following day - Pascha....when the birds greet the morning in a burst of song...before you've even made it to bed...they are up and joyously singing!  That might be my imagination...but, I imagine the same thing year after year!  ;-)

Same with Feast days!

Sundays, as well.  My mother raised us to do no "work" on Sundays.  No laundry.  The grass doesn't get cut.  No sewing.  This can all be accomplished on one of the other 6 days.  Sunday is reserved for the Lord's work.  After Divine Liturgy, go out and volunteer, visit a nursing home, or stay home and read.

God didn't need to rest on the 7th day, however, He knew that we would.

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« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2010, 07:00:48 PM »

I seem to have glossed over the fact that you were talking about Holy Week. I agree completely, Holy Week should be spent in very solemn contemplation, and spending as much time at church as possible. I know a number of people who take all of that week off work so they can do so.
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biro
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« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2010, 07:27:09 PM »

Thank you for being patient. If I was out of line, big  Kiss for everyone.   Wink Cheesy
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« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2010, 10:59:22 PM »

Quote from: orthonorm

Quote from: Walter Sobchak
Saturday, Donny, is Shabbos, the Jewish day of rest. That means that I don't work, I don't drive a car, I don't @!#! ride in a car, I don't handle money, I don't turn on the oven, and I sure as @!@! *don't @!@!@! roll*!

I don't know what you're talking about. I will explain what I meant, which I thought would be understood here. I was brought up in a Catholic home, and my parents would have me taken out of school on Good Friday. I was to stay home, and I mean stay home, between 12 noon and three PM on Good Friday, because those were the hours Our Lord was on the Cross. That was the Catholic tradition in those times, and my parents were pretty serious about observing it. When I got a little older, they expected me to go to all the Holy Week services, and I mean all of them-- morning, afternoon, evening, the Hours and the ones that go for two or three hours. I remember Mom would drop me off and go find a place to park a couple of blocks away because the place was dang near full. We stood up almost the whole time, we held candles, we sang... it was the last of the 'good days,' before they stopped caring how they ran the parishes, before a whole lot of other things that I don't have time to talk about now-- or I could, but I wasn't kidding.

What I was trying to ask in the first place, was whether the Orthodox kept the same habit of staying indoors or keeping things generally low-key on Good Friday (when you're not at church). Holy Saturday in particular is always one of the most difficult days of the year for me. I tend to get pretty depressed on that day. Yes, I know the Resurrection is the day after that, so in a sense the Lord is almost with us then, but in a way He is not (yet). Maybe you think that's funny? I don't.

I don't know, maybe I'm not cut out for this, maybe I'm not going to make it anyway. It's a good thing I know the people in my parish, because otherwise, I don't know what I'm going to do. Maybe I will just have to be 'wrong' and have to pray all the more for God to forgive me. I am sorry.

I guess you're not a golfer . . .
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« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2010, 02:35:58 AM »

I try to keep a general rule of not going to any businesses on Sundays, but I don't know if there are "rules" about this. For me it was a simple as putting all of these together:

1) We are not to do servile work on the Lord's Day.

2) If I go shopping, out to eat, etc. then I am causing someone else to have to do servile work on the Lord's Day.

3) I am also preventing people from having the opportunity to attend church services on a Sunday.

4) Our culture used to collectively respect the solemnity of Sunday and basically shut down everything. There are still small vestiges of this (such as shorter hours on Sunday), and I think we as Orthodox Christians should actively nurture these small remnants of piety in popular culture. If we (meaning all Christians) don't shop on Sundays, then they're not going to be open.

It's not really that hard to prepare ahead of time and fill up on fuel for your vehicle, stock up on groceries, and not go luxury shopping one day of the week.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2010, 02:37:15 AM by Alveus Lacuna » Logged
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